Antonio_Meza's Personal Name List

Aimengarda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Occitan, Gascon (Archaic)
Gascon variant of Ermengarda.
Amusko
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: AH-mus-koh, ah-MUS-koh
Common Basque name in the middle ages. It possibly originates from the Basque toponyms Muskitz or Muskiz. It has been documented mainly in Navarre, as early as the 10th century.
Anderazu
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: an-DEHR-a-soo
Derived from Basque andere "lady". It was popular during the middle ages and has been found in Aquitanian inscriptions as early as the 1st century AD.
Andreauria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: an-dreh-ow-REE-a
Derived from Basque andere meaning "Lady", and Auria.
Andregoto
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: ahn-DRREH-goh-toh
Combination of Andre and Goto.
Andremantzia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: an-dreh-MAN-tsya, an-DREH-man-TSEE-a
Derived from Basque andere meaning "Lady", and Mantzia.
Andreoneka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: an-dreh-O-neh-ka, an-dreh-o-NEH-ka
Derived from Basque andere meaning "Lady", and Oneka.
Andrezuria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: an-DREH-soo-REE-a, an-dreh-soo-REE-a
Derived from Basque andere meaning "Lady", and Zuria meaning "white".
Antón
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Galician
Pronounced: an-TONG
Galician form of Antonius (see Anthony).
Aratzuri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: a-RA-tsoo-ree
Derived from aratz, meaning "pure", and zuri, meaning "white".
It's also the name of a town in the Oltza Zendea municipality in Navarre.
Belissenda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Occitan
Dardan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Albanian
From the name of the Dardani, an Illyrian tribe who lived on the Balkan Peninsula. Their name may derive from an Illyrian word meaning "pear". They were unrelated to the ancient people who were also called the Dardans who lived near Troy.
Edunxe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque (Archaic)
Pronounced: eh-DOON-sheh
Ancient Basque female name recorded on a Roman era tombstone (centuries I - III) in the Occitanian commune of Sent-Gaudenç.
Egilona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Spanish, Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
Medieval Spanish name of Visigothic origin. Possibly related to Old Norse name Egil.

Egilona was the last queen of the Visigoths during the 8th century.

Eilo
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Medieval Spanish, Medieval Basque
Medieval Spanish and Basque name of uncertain meaning and origin. Very common name during the middle ages, specially in the Álava province of the Basque country. In other regions of Spain it has been found mainly as a female name, probably a contraction of Eulalia or Eloísa. Other hypothesis say it's derived from Visigothic name Egilona.

Eylo or Gilo was the first attested count of Álava during the 9th century.
Eylo Alfonso (1075-1109), Leonese noblewoman who founded several churches and hospitals in Valladolid, and wife of count Pedro Ansúrez.

Erenia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish (Rare), Aragonese (Rare)
Pronounced: e-REH-nya
Variant of Herenia, also an Aragonese form.
Ermengarda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Occitan, Medieval Spanish
Occitan and Spanish form of Ermingard.
Ermesenda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Medieval Basque name first recorded in Leire in 1109. It is likely a variant of Germanic Ermesind.
Errafaila
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque, Basque Mythology
Medieval Basque name of unknown origin and meaning.

It entered Basque folklore as the name of a witch who eventually found her death on the stake in Urdiain.

Fortún
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Spanish (Archaic)
Pronounced: FOR-TUN
Medieval Spanish name derived from Latin fortunae meaning "fortune", or from fortunatus, meaning "one with fortune".
Several navarrese kings and noblemen bore this name.
Goto
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Spanish (Rare), Medieval Basque (Rare)
Pronounced: go-to
Medieval Spanish and Basque name of Visigothic origin, meaning "Goth", commonly used in combination with Andere "lady", in the form Andregoto.
Hestia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Ἑστία(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHS-TEE-A(Classical Greek) HEHS-tee-ə(English)
Derived from Greek ἑστία (hestia) meaning "hearth, fireside". In Greek mythology Hestia was the goddess of the hearth and domestic activity.
Illyria
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek, Various (Rare)
Other Scripts: Ίλλυρία(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of Illyrios.
Katelina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Bulgarian, Medieval Basque
Other Scripts: Кателина(Bulgarian)
Basque and Bulgarian adaption of Cateline.
Katixa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque, Basque
Medieval Basque name of uncertain origin and meaning. One theory suggests that it might be a variant of Katalin and thus one of the international forms of Katherine.

In any case, this name was first recorded in Etxaleku (in the Navarre area) in 1548.

Liuvigoto
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
Liuvigoto (7th-century – fl. 693) was a Visigoth queen consort by marriage to king Erwig (680–687). In 683, her spouse attempted to secure a reform in which the remarriage of a widow after the death of a king was banned as adultery, in order to prevent the custom of usurpers marrying the widows of their predecessors to legitimize their rule. She was the mother of queen Cixilo. When her son-in-law succeeded her husband in 687, she and her daughters were forced to enter a convent.

In the Zaragoza Council of 691, one of the suggested reforms was to force the widow of a king to enter a convent after the death of her spouse, which may be influenced by her activity. In 691, she was asked to participate in the rebellion of Sisebert against the king. In the Sixteenth Council of Toledo of 693, the conspirators were named as Liubigotona, Frogellius, Theodemir, Luvilana, and Thekla.

Llume
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Asturian (Rare)
Pronounced: YOO-me
Asturian form of Luz.
Mariola
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: ma-RYO-la
Pet form of María Dolores.
Ordoño
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Spanish, Medieval Galician
Spanish and Galician form of Medieval Latin Ordonius, itself of unknown meaning and origin. Theories include a corruption of Fortunius and a derivation from Basque urde "pig, wild boar".
Orti
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Derived from either Fortunius or Fortis.
Ortixa
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Basque
Pronounced: or-TEE-sha
Feminine form of Orti.
Ostaixka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque (Rare)
Pronounced: os-TIE-shka
Basque name meaning "Daisy flower".
Tancredo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese (Brazilian, Rare)
Portuguese form of Tancred.
Urraca
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval Spanish, Medieval Basque, Medieval Galician
Derived from Spanish urraca "magpie", ultimately from Latin furax "thievish". Several medieval queens of Navarre bore this name.
Vindemiatrix
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: vin-DEM-EE-ə-trix
Means "female wine harvester". This is the name of a star on the constellation Virgo, and is named such because it rises in early autumn, the beginning of the wine harvesting season.
Wilesindo
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Spanish, Ancient Germanic (Gothic, Hispanicized), History (Ecclesiastical)
Pronounced: wee-leh-SEEN-doh(Medieval Spanish)
Medieval Spanish name of Visigothic origin.
Most notable bearer was Wilesindo, bishop of Pamplona between the years of 845 and 860.
Ximena
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: khee-MEH-na
Feminine form of Ximeno. This was the name of the wife of El Cid.
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