Akkadian Submitted Names

These names were used in ancient Akkad.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Agušaya f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the whirling dancer", deriving from the Akkadian words gâšum ("to dance") and gūštum ("dance"). Attested as an epithet for Ishtar in the Hymn of Agushaya.
Annunitum 𒀭𒉡𒉌𒌈 f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "the skirmisher" or "the martial one". This was an epithet of Ishtar in her capacity as a war goddess. Later in the Sargonic period, Annunitum became a distinct deity in her own right.
Aspashini m Akkadian
Akkadian form of Aspačanā.
Ašratu 𒀀𒅆𒋥 f Akkadian
Akkadian form of Asherah.
Astyages m Old Median (Hellenized), Akkadian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Akkadian Ishtovigu or Ištovigu, from Old Median R̥štivaigah, ultimately derived from Ancient Iranian rishti vaiga, meaning "swinging the spear". Modified through folk etymology by Greek ἄστυ (ásty) meaning "city" and ἄγνυμι (ágnumi) meaning "break"... [more]
Ausi'i 𒁹𒀀𒌑𒋛𒀪 m Akkadian
Akkadian form of Hosea.
Bartatua 𒁹𒁇𒋫𒌅𒀀 m Akkadian
Akkadian form of either the Scythian name Pr̥ϑutavah ("with far-reaching strength") or the Scythian name Pṛtatavah ("mighty in battle").
Bēlet-bābili f Babylonian, Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of Babylon", deriving from the Akkadian element belet (mistress, lady). This was a Babylonian name for the goddess Ishtar. Ishtar was worshipped under this name in the temple of Eturkalamma.
Bēlet-balāṭi f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "mistress of life", deriving from the Akkadian elements bēlet ("mistress or lady") and balāṭu ("life, vigour, good health"). This was possibly an Akkadian name for the goddess Nungal.
Belet-eanna f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
An Akkadian name for the goddess Inanna, specifically in her capacity as Inanna of Uruk. Likely derives in part from the Akkadian belet ("mistress or lady").
Belet-ekallim f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "Mistress of the Palace", from Akkadian element belet ("mistress or lady"). This was the Akkadian name for the Sumerian goddess Ninegal.
Belet-nagar f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "Mistress of Nagar" (an ancient city in Syria), from the Akkadian element belet (meaning "mistress or lady"). Belet-Nagar was a tutelary goddess associated with kingship. She was possibly an Akkadian equivalent to the Hittite goddess Nabarbi.
Belet-ninua f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "Lady of Nineveh", deriving from Akkadian elements belet ("lady") and ninua (likely an Akkadian form of Nineveh).
Bēl-ṣarbi m Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "lord of the poplar", deriving from the Akkadian elements bēlu ("boss, chief, master, lord") and ṣarbat (deriving from a place name, that presumably later became associated with groves of trees... [more]
Darimush m Akkadian
Akkadian form of Darius.
Ea-nasir m Akkadian
Meaning unknown. This was the name of an ancient Akkadian merchant whose customer, a man named Nanni, wrote to him the oldest known written complaint.
Erra m Near Eastern Mythology, Babylonian, Akkadian
The Babylonian god of war, death, and other disasters. He may be identified with Nergal, the god of death. Erra expressed death himself symbolically by his continuous lethargy as he lay in a drunken stupor... [more]
Ilaba'is-takal m Akkadian
Meaning unknown. A noted bearer is Ilaba'is-takal, an Akkadian prince (23rd century BCE), the son of King Sargon of Akkad (Sargon the Great) and Queen Tashlultum, brother of Enheduanna, Rimush, and Manishtushu, and uncle of Naram-Sin.
Kurunnītu f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Likely means "high quality beer", deriving from the Akkadian kurunnum (itself a derivation of the Sumerian kurun). Name borne by an Akkadian goddess, likely equivalent to the Sumerian goddess of beer Ninkasi.
Kurunnitu-sarrat f Akkadian, Ancient Assyrian
Possibly means "Kurunnitu is queen", derived from the goddess Kurunnītu, and šarrat ("queen").
Kurunnitu-tabni f Akkadian, Ancient Assyrian
Possibly means "Kurunnitu is our comrade", derived from the name of the goddess Kurunnītu, and the Akkadian elements tappa-um ("comrade") and ni ("our").
Labbatu f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "lioness", deriving from the Akkadian lābatu ("lioness"). This is attested as an alternate name for Ishtar in an Eblaite god list.
Lamashtu 𒀭𒈕𒈨 f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Possibly means "she who erases", deriving from the Akkadian element pašāṭu ("to erase"). Name borne by a female demon thought to menace women during childbirth. Since her name was written with the symbol 𒀭 (dingir, used to signify the name of a deity), and she is described as acting malevolently of her own accord (rather than at the direction of the gods), it is hypothesised that she was a goddess or demigoddess in her own right.
Manishtushu m Akkadian
Meaning unknown.... [more]
Nanaya-kesirat f Babylonian, Akkadian
Means "Nanaya is the one who compensates", deriving from the goddess Nanaya, and the Akkadian element kašāru ("to compensate, to give its due").
Qibī-dumqī-ilat f Akkadian, Babylonian
Meaning uncertain, however the name possibly derives from the Akkadian elements qibītu "speech ; order, command ; request, prayer" and "dumqu ("goodness , good thing").
Qudāšu f Akkadian, Babylonian
Means "earring", deriving from the Akkadian word qudaštu.
Rimush 𒌷𒈬𒍑 m Akkadian
Meaning unknown. A noted bearer is Rimush, an Akkadian king (c.2280 BCE), the second king of the Akkadian empire, son of King Sargon of Akkad and Queen Tashlultum, brother of Manishtushu, and uncle of Naram-Sin.
Sarratu f Akkadian, Ancient Assyrian
Means "princess" and is related to the name Sarah. (The description of the entry Sarah should include this information about "Sarratu" I think as it is stronger evidence that Sarah means princess for those say it doesn't mean princess and means more of a position of power in general)
Shar-kali-sharri 𒀭𒊬𒂵𒉌 𒈗𒌷 m Akkadian
Meaning “king of kings”. Shar-Kali-Sharri was the king of the Akkadian Empire and the son of Naram-Sin
Shu-enlil m Akkadian
Meaning uncertain, but related to the god Enlil.... [more]
Shulgi-simti f Ancient Near Eastern, Akkadian
Possibly means "Shulgi is my glory". Name borne by a wife of Shulgi, who is known from texts concerning her possessions, and the people who worked for her in her household. Her name is possibly of Akkadian origin, and hints at an Akkadian origin for Shulgi-simti herself (as she likely assumed this name on her marriage to Shulgi).
Šuqurtum f Ancient Near Eastern, Akkadian
Of uncertain etymology, however the name is possibly of Akkadian origin, as it ends in the Akkadian feminine suffix tum. One possible name element is the Akkadian šūquru ("very precious, valuable")... [more]
Tasmetu-tabni f Babylonian, Akkadian
Possibly means "Tashmetu is our comrade", deriving from the goddess Tashmetum, and the Akkadian elements tappa-um ("comrade") and ni ("our").
Zakutu f Akkadian
Akkadian form of Naqi'a.