Near Eastern Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in the mythologies of the Near East. That is, the mythologies of the Sumerians, Akkadians, Hittites, Babylonians, Phoenicians and others. Listed separately are Egyptian mythology names and Persian mythology names.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Abadir m Near Eastern Mythology, Coptic (Bohairic), Coptic (Sahidic), Arabic (Archaic), Ethiopian, Somali (Archaic)
Means "mighty father". This was a Phoenician name for the highest deity. It was borne by a legendary Coptic saint who was martyred with his sister Irais (or Iraja, Herais, Rhais).
Abatur m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend, Near Eastern Mythology, Arabic (Archaic)
Means literally, "father of the Uthre" in Mandaean, which translates roughly to "father of the angels," derived from aba "father" combined with uthra ('utria) "angel". In the Mandaean Gnostic cosmology, Abatur is "the third of four emanations from the supreme, unknowable deity", and the father of Ptahil, the Mandaean demiurge.
Abyzou f Near Eastern Mythology
Appears to be a corrupted form of the Greek ἄβυσσος ábyssos "abyss", the Greek itself was borrowed from Akkadian Apsu or Sumerian Abzu.
Adamma f Hurrian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving from the Eblaite element ʾdm ("blood, red"). Name borne by a goddess of the Eblaite pantheon who was later incorporated into the Hurrian pantheon.
Adramelech m Biblical, Near Eastern Mythology, Literature
Latin form of אַדְרַמֶּלֶךְ (Adar-malik) meaning "king of fire" in Hebrew. This was the name of a Babylonian deity to whom infants were burnt in sacrifice (II Kings xvii, 31)... [more]
Agasaya f Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly means "shrieker". This was the name of an early Semitic goddess of war who was merged into Ishtar in her identity as fearless warrior of the sky.
Agušaya f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the whirling dancer", deriving from the Akkadian words gâšum ("to dance") and gūštum ("dance"). Attested as an epithet for Ishtar in the Hymn of Agushaya.
Ahura f Near Eastern Mythology, Persian Mythology
Referring to either the creator god Ahura Mazda or the various other ahuras of the Avesta. Meaning, "lord" or "spirit."
Ahurani f Near Eastern Mythology, Persian Mythology
Means "she who belongs to Ahura" in Avestan, from the name Ahura, referring to either the creator god Ahura Mazda or the various other ahuras of the Avesta, combined with the feminine suffix -ani meaning "companion, wife, mate"... [more]
Aja f Near Eastern Mythology
In Mesopotamian mythology, Aja was the wife of the sun god Šamaš.
Ala f Hittite Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Ala was a Hittite and Luwian goddess of the wilderness and partner of the god Runtiya. Her name is likely derived from the Luwian adjective ala- "high".
Aleyin m Near Eastern Mythology, Phoenician
A Phoenician god of springs and vegetation.
Alilat f Near Eastern Mythology
Variant of Allat. The Arabian mother goddess.
Allani f Hurrian Mythology
In Hurrian mythology, Allani was the goddess of the underworld. Her name is likely derived from Hurrian allai=ni "lady, mistress".
Allanzu f Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving from the Hurrian element alla=i, meaning "lady, queen". Another possible element is the Hurrian alu-, meaning "to speak". Name borne by a Hurrian goddess that was often worshipped alongside Hepat, who was considered to be her mother.
Allat f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the Goddess" from Arabic al-Lat. She was an ancient mother and fertility goddess of the pre-Islamic Arabs.
Allatu f Near Eastern Mythology
This was the name of the Mesopotamian goddess of copulation, equal to the Sumero-Babylonian goddess Ereshkigal; perhaps her name was a Semitic form of Ereshkigal... [more]
Almaqah m Near Eastern Mythology
A moon-god and tutelary god of the South Arabian kingdom of Saba.
Alulim m Sumerian Mythology
Means "horn of the red deer" or "seed of the red deer" in Sumerian, deriving from the elements 𒀉 a ("arm, wing, horn") and 𒇻𒅆 lulim ("red deer stag"). This was the name of the legendary first king of Sumer, who is thought today to be a mythological figure... [more]
Al-ʻuzzā f Near Eastern Mythology
The ancient Arabian goddess of might, protection and love. Her name is derived from al-‘Azīz meaning "the mighty".
Amamikyu f Near Eastern Mythology
Amamikyu's name comes from the reading of the Chinese characters 阿摩美久 or 阿摩彌姑, which were most likely written ad hoc for the Okinawan pronunciation.
Amathaunta f Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology she is the goddess of the ocean, possibly related to Poseidon. She was also worshipped by Sumerian immigrants in Egypt which lead to some believing her to be an Egyptian goddess... [more]
Annit f Near Eastern Mythology
Annit was a northern Babylonian moon goddess who was later replaced by Ishtar.
Annunitum f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "the skirmisher" or "the martial one". This was an epithet of Ishtar in her capacity as a war goddess. Later in the Sargonic period, Annunitum became a distinct deity in her own right.
Anshar m Sumerian Mythology
Means "whole heaven", deriving from the Sumerian elements šar ("totality, all"), and an ("sky, heaven"). Name borne by a primordial god of creation, who was viewed as the father of the sky god Anu... [more]
Antu f Near Eastern Mythology
She evolved from the Sumerian goddess Ki. ... [more]
Anzû m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "heavenly eagle". Name borne by a Mesopotamian demon, who was drawn in the form of a huge fire and water breathing bird, or a lion-headed eagle.
Appaliunas m Near Eastern Mythology
Anatolian god which possibly means "father lion" or "father light". A Theory states that Appaliunas can be equated with Apollo
Ardoxsho f Near Eastern Mythology
Kushan goddess of wealth primarily worshipped in the early first milennium CE. She is known in the Avesta as Ashi, and parallels have also been drawn with the Greek goddess Tyche, the Persian goddess Anahita, and the Buddhist deity Hariti.
Arsay f Semitic Mythology, Ugaritic Mythology
Means "earthy", deriving from the Ugaritic element ‘arṣ ("earth, underworld"), combined with the feminine suffix y. Although her role is unknown, it is theorised that she was an underworld goddess... [more]
Ashima f Biblical Hebrew, Semitic Mythology
Means "the name, portion, or lot" depending on context. Possibly from the Semitic šmt 'charge, duty, function'. Also known as Ashim-Yahu, Ashima-Yaho, and Ashim-Beth-El... [more]
Aškašepa m Hittite Mythology
Means "genius of the gate/door", deriving from the Hittite element aška ("door"). Aškašepa is thought to have been a deified mountain, worshipped in Kanesh and Hattusa. He was a major member of the Hittite pantheon.
Ašratum f Near Eastern Mythology
A cognate of the Ugaritic Asherah. Name borne by an Amorite goddess who was likely derived from the same source as Asherah, however she came to occupy her own distinct position in the Amorite pantheon... [more]
Astar m Near Eastern Mythology
The name of an Aksumite god.
Atargatis f Semitic Mythology (Hellenized)
Atargatis was the chief goddess of northern Syria in Classical antiquity. She was also referred to as Derketo (Ancient Greek: Δερκετὼ) or Deasura (by Romans)... [more]
Ayu-ikalti f Hurrian Mythology
The Hurrian name for the Sumerian sun goddess Aya, who was incorporated into the Hurrian pantheon. This name likely derives from the phrase Aya kallatu, meaning "Aya, the bride".
Baltis f Semitic Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of an Arabian goddess associated with the planet Venus.
Bašmu m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "venomous snake", possibly deriving from the Sumerian elements muš ("snake, reptile") and ("venom, poison"). Name borne by a figure from Mesopotamian mythology, a horned snake with two forelegs and wings.
Bēlet-bābili f Babylonian, Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of Babylon", deriving from the Akkadian element belet (mistress, lady). This was a Babylonian name for the goddess Ishtar. Ishtar was worshipped under this name in the temple of Eturkalamma.
Bēlet-balāṭi f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "mistress of life", deriving from the Akkadian elements bēlet ("mistress or lady") and balāṭu ("life, vigour, good health"). This was possibly an Akkadian name for the goddess Nungal.
Belet-eanna f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
An Akkadian name for the goddess Inanna, specifically in her capacity as Inanna of Uruk. Likely derives in part from the Akkadian belet ("mistress or lady").
Belet-ekallim f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "Mistress of the Palace", from Akkadian element belet ("mistress or lady"). This was the Akkadian name for the Sumerian goddess Ninegal.
Belet-ili f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of the gods" or "mother of the gods" in Akkadian, deriving from the elements beltu ("lady, mistress") and ilu ("god, deity"). It is another name for the mother goddess Ninhursag.
Belet-nagar f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "Mistress of Nagar" (an ancient city in Syria), from the Akkadian element belet (meaning "mistress or lady"). Belet-Nagar was a tutelary goddess associated with kingship. She was possibly an Akkadian equivalent to the Hittite goddess Nabarbi.
Belet-ninua f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "Lady of Nineveh", deriving from Akkadian elements belet ("lady") and ninua (likely an Akkadian form of Nineveh).
Belet-seri f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "mistress of the steppe". The name borne by an underworld goddess in the court of Ereshkigal who was tasked with recording information about the dead entering the afterlife... [more]
Bēl-ṣarbi m Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "lord of the poplar", deriving from the Akkadian elements bēlu ("boss, chief, master, lord") and ṣarbat (deriving from a place name, that presumably later became associated with groves of trees... [more]
Birtum m Near Eastern Mythology
Means "fetter" or "shackle". Birtum was an underworld god, regarded as the husband of Nungal.
Bithnanaia f Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Bithnanaia was a Palmyrene goddess, considered to be the daughter of the god Konon.
Bizilla f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "she who is pleasing". Bizilla was a love goddess considered to be the "sukkal" (vizier deity) for the goddess Ninlil. She is occasionally counted among the courtiers of Inanna, and is also closely associated with Nanaya.
Damgalnuna f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "great wife of the prince", deriving from the Sumerian elements dam, meaning "spouse, husband or wife", 𒃲 gal, meaning "great, mighty", and nun, meaning "prince, noble, master"... [more]
Damkina f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "true wife", deriving from the Akkadian element kīnu "honest, trustworthy, faithful". The Akkadian name for the goddess Damgalnuna. She was the consort of Enki and mother of the god Marduk... [more]
Derketo f Semitic Mythology (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Aramaic 𐡕𐡓𐡏𐡕 (Tarʿatta), the apocope form of 𐡏𐡕𐡓𐡏𐡕𐡄 (ʿAttarʿattā), another name of the Syrian goddess Atargatis.
Dhat-badan f Semitic Mythology
The name of an Himyarite nature goddess worshipped in Yemen, Somalia and Ethiopia, associated with the oasis, nature and the wet season. Etymology uncertain, it may mean "she of the wild goats".
Dhat-ba'dhanum f Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Etymology uncertain. This was another name given to the sun goddess Shams.
Dilbat f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the planet Venus". This was an epithet for Ishtar, attested in the Babylonian text, "The Cuthean Legend of Naram-Sin".
Enten m Sumerian Mythology
Means "winter", deriving from the Sumerian entena ("winter"). Enten was a fertility god that was specifically identified with the fertility of livestock during the winter period.
Erra m Near Eastern Mythology, Babylonian, Akkadian
The Babylonian god of war, death, and other disasters. He may be identified with Nergal, the god of death. Erra expressed death himself symbolically by his continuous lethargy as he lay in a drunken stupor... [more]
Geštinanna f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of an early goddess of Southern Mesopotamia associated with writing and the netherworld. Her name means "wine (or vine) of the heavens (or the god An 2)", deriving from the Sumerian element ĝeštin ("vine, wine, bunch of grapes")... [more]
Ḫabūrītum f Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly means either "the one from Ḫabura" (a name borne by several settlements in ancient Mesopotamia and Anatolia) or "the one from the Khabur river". Name borne by a river goddess worshipped as part of the Hurrian pantheon.
Hanish m Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly deriving from the Akkadian word ḫanīšum ("submission"), although this etymology is contested. Name borne by a god of destruction, that was always invoked alongside his twin Shullat.
Hannahannah f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
From Hittite hanna- meaning "grandmother". She is a Hurrian Mother Goddess related to or influenced by the pre-Sumerian goddess Inanna. Hannahannah was also identified with the Hurrian goddess Hepat.
Ḫapantali f Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of an Anatolian and Luwian pastoral goddess associated with sheep.
Hatepuna f Near Eastern Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Her name originates in Hattic ha "sea" and puna "child". She is the daughter of the sea god and becomes the wife of Telipinu because of the rescue of Istanu.
Hebat f Near Eastern Mythology
Hebat, was the mother goddess of the Hurrians, known as "the mother of all living". She is also a Queen of the deities. During Aramaean times Hebat also appears to have become identified with the goddess Hawwah, or Eve.
Ḫepat f Hurrian Mythology
Means "She of Halab". Ḫepat was the mother goddess of the Hurrian people. Her name occurs frequently as an element of personal names, examples being the names Puduhepa, and Tadukhipa.
Ḫišamītum f Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Means "Lady of Ḫišamta" (a city in the kingdom of Mari), utilising the Akkadian feminine suffix tum. Name borne by the tutelary goddess of Ḫišamta, who is thought to have been a localised adaptation of Ishtar.
Hubal m Near Eastern Mythology
May mean "master god". From the Aramaic hu meaning 'spirit, god', and Ba'al 'master, lord'.... [more]
Humbaba m Sumerian Mythology, Near Eastern Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a figure from Mesopotamian mythology, whose name has been attested both with and without the dingir 𒀭 (a determinative sign written before the names of gods and goddesses)... [more]
Humban m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of the most important male god in the Elamite pantheon. His name apparently means "commander" in Elamite, as it is derived from the Elamite verb huba "to command". Most sources state that Humban was the god of the sky, though there are also a few sources who claim that he was the god of the earth... [more]
Hutellura f Hurrian Mythology
Likely means "midwife", deriving from the Hurrian hutelluri. Hutellura was a goddess of fate, and a divine midwife. In her role as a divine midwife she is closely associated with Hutena.
Hutena f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
Likely derived from the Hurrian ḫut, which has been translated as both "to favour" and "to raise". Hutena was a goddess of fate in Hurrian mythology, and was also a divine midwife. In her role as a divine midwife, she is associated closely with Hutellura.
Hutran m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In Elamite religion, Hutran is the son of the god Humban (also known by his epithet Napirisha) and his wife, the goddess Kiririsha. It is uncertain what kind of god he was, but since his name might possibly mean "overwhelmer" in Elamite, it could be that he was a god of soldiers and fighters... [more]
Ḫuwaššanna f Hittite Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a goddess worshipped as part of the Hittite and Luwian pantheons. Her main centers of worship were in Ḫupišna and Kuliwišna.
Illuyanka m Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Likely means "snake", from Proto-Indo-European elements *h₁illu- and *h₂engʷeh₂. Illuyanka was the name of a serpentine dragon in Hittite mythology, who was slain by the sky god Tarhunz... [more]
Inara f Hittite Mythology
In Hittite–Hurrian mythology, Inara was the goddess of the wild animals of the steppe and daughter of the Storm-god Teshub.
Inshushinak m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
Inshushinak was the name of one of the major gods of the Elamite pantheon. He started out as a mere local god, in which capacity he was the patron deity of the city of Susa. This is also reflected in his name, as it is derived from Sumerian nin-shushinak meaning "lord of Susa"... [more]
Irkalla f Near Eastern Mythology
Another name for Ereshkigal, the Queen of the underworld.
Iršappa m Hurrian Mythology, Semitic Mythology
The Hurrian name for the god Resheph. He was worshipped under this name in the Hurrian pantheon and was regarded as a god of commerce and the marketplace.
Ishara f Near Eastern Mythology
An ancient Hittite goddess associated with love and oaths. Her name possibly comes from the Hittite word for "treaty, binding promise", or may be related to the name of the goddess Ishtar.
Ishme-karab f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. Her name is Akkadian and means "she who has heard the prayer" or "she has heard the supplication". The Elamite form of her name is said to be Išnikarap... [more]
Ištanu m & f Near Eastern Mythology
Deriving from the Hattic estan meaning "Sun deity, day". This was an epithet likely used to refer to the of the Sun Goddess of Arinna. It was also used in reference to a solar deity known as the Sun God of Heaven (equivalent to the Hurrian Simige).
Iyarri m Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Iyarri was a god of plague and war in both the Hittite and Luwian pantheons. He is known from oaths sworn in the in the Šuppiluliuma-Šattiwazza treaty, where he is depicted as a man standing on the back of a lion.
Jabru m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of an obscure but very old god in Elamite religion. It is uncertain what the meaning of his name was in the Elamite language. Most sources equate him with the Babylonian god Anu 2, so he must have been a god of the heavens... [more]
Kammamma f Hittite Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a goddess considered to be the daughter of the storm god Tarhunna. She was possibly associated with magic, as one of her known epithets is ḫašawanz ("sorceress").
Kamrušepa f Hittite Mythology, Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Kamrušepa was a Hittite goddess of medicine and magic, who was also worshipped as part of the Luwian pantheon during the Bronze age. She seems to have been associated with the Mesopotamian goddess Gula.
Kataḫziwuri f Near Eastern Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Possibly deriving from the Hattian elements kattaḫ ("queen") and wur ("country). Name borne by a Hattian and Palaic goddess known from texts surrounding purification and building rituals... [more]
Kattaḫḫa f Hittite Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Likely deriving from the Hattic word kattaḫ ("queen"), this theonym was applied to several goddesses, the most prominent of whom was the tutelary goddess of the city of Ankuwa. She is listed alongside other 'queen goddesses' in treaties, such as Ḫuwaššanna.
Khebe f Hittite Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain. Name borne by a tutelary deity in the Hurrian and Hittite pantheons.
Kiaše m Hurrian Mythology
Means "sea", deriving from the ordinary Hurrian noun. Name borne by a Hurrian deity that represented the sea, who was also worshipped in Ugarit and Alalakh. He was often seen as an ally of the god Kumarbi.
Kiririsha f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of an important goddess in Elamite religion. Her name apparently means "Great Goddess" or "Great Lady" in the Elamite language, with one source stating that the name consists of Elamite kiri or kirir "goddess" and Elamite usa(n) (relation with the Elamite word rishair "great" is also likely)... [more]
Kishar f Near Eastern Mythology
Her name is argued to mean "the whole earth", possibly deriving from the Akkadian element kili ("all, whole, totality"). The name of an Akkadian goddess that represented the Earth, with her twin Anshar representing the sky... [more]
Kothar-wa-khasis m Near Eastern Mythology, Ugaritic
Means "skillful and wise". Name borne by an Ugaritic god of craftsmanship and magic. Some academics consider him to be equivalent to the Greek god Hephaestus.
Kubaba f Hurrian Mythology
Of unknown etymology. Kubaba (kug-ba-u) was the name of minor Hurro-Hittite goddess. A Sumerian queen that ruled in the Early Dynastic III (ca. 2500–2330 BC) period of Sumer, also went by this name... [more]
Kuišḫamaššani f Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Means "any god", deriving from the Luwian word maššan(i) ("god"). Name borne by a goddess of the Luwian pantheon, who was often depicted holding grapes.
Kulitta f Hurrian Mythology
In Hurrian Mythology, Kulitta is one of the handmaids of the goddess Šauška.
Kumarbi m Hurrian Mythology
Kumarbi is the chief god of the Hurrians. He is the son of Anu (the sky), and father of the storm-god Teshub. He was identified by the Hurrians with Sumerian Enlil, by the Greeks as Kronos and by the Ugaritians with El.... [more]
Kurunnītu f Akkadian, Near Eastern Mythology
Likely means "high quality beer", deriving from the Akkadian kurunnum (itself a derivation of the Sumerian kurun). Name borne by an Akkadian goddess, likely equivalent to the Sumerian goddess of beer Ninkasi.
Kurunta m Hittite Mythology
Possibly deriving from the Proto-Indo-European root *kerh ("horn"). Name borne by a Hittite god of hunting and wild animals, who was often associated with deer. A possible Luwian origin has been proposed for Kurunta, by way of the god Runtiya entering the Hittite pantheon, however this is disputed.
Kuwannaniya f Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving in part from the Hittite element kuu̯an ("woman"). Kuwannaniya was a Hittite goddess of spring, possibly related to a specific sacred space (known as loci numinosi).
Labbatu f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Means "lioness", deriving from the Akkadian lābatu ("lioness"). This is attested as an alternate name for Ishtar in an Eblaite god list.
Lagamar f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. Her name is Akkadian and means "no mercy". The Elamite form of her name is said to be Lakamar. The fact that her name is Akkadian rather than Elamite, is possibly due to the fact that Elam had repeatedly been under Akkadian rule and was thus influenced by the Akkadian language and culture... [more]
Lamashtu f Near Eastern Mythology, Akkadian
Possibly means "she who erases", deriving from the Akkadian element pašāṭu ("to erase"). Name borne by a female demon thought to menace women during childbirth. Since her name was written with the symbol 𒀭 (dingir, used to signify the name of a deity), and she is described as acting malevolently of her own accord (rather than at the direction of the gods), it is hypothesised that she was a goddess or demigoddess in her own right.
Lammašaga f Sumerian Mythology
Means "the good Lamma (a kind of protector spirit)", deriving from the Sumerian element šag ("sweet, good, pleasant"). Name borne by a sukkal (vizier deity) of the goddess Bau.
Laṣ f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Of unknown etymology, possibly deriving from an unrecorded Semitic language. Laṣ was considered to be the wife of the Sumerian god Nergal, as she is listed as such in the Weidner god list... [more]
Lelluri f Hurrian Mythology
Of unknown meaning, however the name is linked to several other names in Hurrian mythology by the suffix -luri. Lelluri was a Hurrian goddess of mountains.
Lelwani m & f Hittite Mythology
Etymology uncertain. This was the name of the Hittite deity of the underworld, who was thought to live in the dark of the earth, and whose temples were associated with mausoleums. Originally derived from a Hattian god, Lelwani later came to be viewed as a goddess, due to syncretization with several female deities.
Liluri f Near Eastern Mythology
Entymology unknown. This was the name of an ancient Syrian goddess of mountains.
Lilwanis f Hittite Mythology
Hittite name for the cthonic deity Lelwani.
Lugal-irra m Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly means "mighty lord", deriving in part from the Sumerian element 𒈗 (lugal), meaning "king, owner, master". Name borne by Mespotamian god who, along with his twin brother Meslamta-ea, was thought of as a guardian of doorways... [more]
Lulal m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "syrup man" or "man sweet like syrup", likely deriving from the Sumerian elements 𒇽 ("grown man"), and làl ("honey, date syrup"). In Sumerian mythology, Lulal, inscribed dlú.làl in cuneiform, is the younger son of Inanna... [more]
Ma f Sumerian Mythology
Means "land" in Sumerian. In Sumerian mythology, Ma is referred to as the mother of the mountain.
Maḫdianna m Sumerian Mythology
Likely meaning "lofty one from heaven", deriving from the Sumerian elements mah ("high, exalted), and 𒀭 an ("sky, heaven"). This was the Sumerian name of a Mesopotamian god of uncertain character... [more]
Maliya f Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Maliya is the Hittite goddess of gardens, often associated with the horse-god Pirwa and the goddess Kamrušepa. All three gods are connected to horses... [more]
Mami f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "mother" in Babylonian. It is another name for Ninhursag.... [more]
Mammitum f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "frost", deriving from the Akkadian element mammû ("ice, frost"). Mammitum is an underworld goddess that was associated with the god Nergal... [more]
Manat f Near Eastern Mythology
Probably either from Arabic مَنَا (manā) meaning "mete out, distribute" or "test, determine" or مُنِيَة (muniya) meaning "fate, destiny, desire, wish". This was the name of the Semitic goddess of time, fate, fortune and death who was worshipped in pre-Islamic Arabia... [more]
Manungal f Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "Mother Nungal", deriving from the Sumerian element ama, and the name of the goddess Nungal. This name was most commonly used to refer to the goddess Nungal in texts written in Akkadian, and in the Emesal dialect of Sumerian.
Manzat f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. Her name is derived from Akkadian manzât "rainbow". The fact that her name is Akkadian rather than Elamite, is possibly due to the fact that Elam had repeatedly been under Akkadian rule and was thus influenced by the Akkadian language and culture... [more]
Medimša f Near Eastern Mythology
Sumerian name for the Hurrian goddess Šala, meaning "possessing lovely limbs".
Meslamta-ea m Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly means "he who comes forth from the Meslam (the name of a temple in Kutha)". Name borne by Mespotamian god who, along with his twin brother Lugal-irra, was thought of as a guardian of doorways... [more]
Mezulla f Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a minor Hittite goddess, who was seen as the daughter of Tarhunna and the sun goddess of Arinna. She was invoked as an intermediary for her mother, and also worshipped as part of a triple deity with the sun goddess of Arinna and Zintuḫi
Milcom m Biblical, Near Eastern Mythology, English (Puritan)
In the Old Testament, Milcom was the highest of the Ammonite gods. It is generally accepted that this name is a form of the common Semitic noun meaning "king" (Hebrew melek), and became an epithet of the head of the Ammonite pantheon... [more]
Miyatanzipa f Hittite Mythology
Means "growth genius", deriving from the Hittite element mai or miya ("to grow, to be born, to thrive"). Name borne by a minor Hittite goddess of vegetation.
Monimos m Semitic Mythology (Hellenized)
Greek name of a god worshipped at Edessa in northern Mesopotamia, from Arabic Mun‘îm meaning "the favourable one", which is derived from the root n‘m "to be pleasing".
Mulanadiri f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "the ruling star of heaven", possibly deriving from the Sumerian elements mul ("star, constellation, planet"), and 𒂗 en ("to rule"). This is documented as an epithet of goddess Inanna in the god list An = Anum.
Mullissu f Near Eastern Mythology, Ancient Assyrian
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by an obscure goddess who was a consort of the god Ashur. May derive from "Mullitum", which was an epithet for the Sumerian goddess Ninlil.
Mušmaḫḫū m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "distinguished/exalted serpent", deriving from the Sumerian elements muš ("snake, reptile") and mah ("high, exalted"). Name borne by a demon in Mespotamian mythology that was thought to be a hybrid of lion, serpent, and bird.
Mušuni f Hurrian Mythology
Means "she of justice", deriving from the Hurrian mušu ("just, righteous"). Name borne by a minor goddess often invoked as part of a dyad with the sun goddess Hepat... [more]
Mylitta f Near Eastern Mythology (Hellenized)
From an Assyrian epithet of the goddess Ishtar meaning "the mediatrix, midwife" (from mu'allidtu). It was recorded by the Greek historian Herodotus, who wrote in the 5th century BC: "The Assyrians call Aphrodite Mylitta, the Arabians Alilat, and the Persians Mitra."
Nabarbi f Hurrian Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Means "she of the pasture", from the Hurrian element naw ("pasture"). Nabarbi was a major Hittite goddess associated with ritual purification, and with farming. She was also possibly worshipped as part of a dyad with the goddess Sauska.
Nahundi m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Nahundi was the god of the sun, but also the god of justice and law. His name - spelled Nahiti in earlier times - was apparently the same as the word for 'sun' in Elamite, although the literal meaning of that word is said to be "creator of the day"... [more]
Nammu f Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology, she was a primeval goddess, corresponding to Tiamat in Babylonian mythology. She gave birth to An and Ki and the first gods, and with An she bore Enki... [more]
Nannaia f Near Eastern Mythology
Nannaia was a Parthian moon goddess.
Nanshe f Near Eastern Mythology
Etymology uncertain; derived in part from Sumerian še "grain". This was the name of a Sumerian goddess of prophecy, justice, fertility, and fishing.
Napir m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Napir was the god of the moon. Some sources state that the meaning of his name is "(the) shining one", but this is questionable - it is more likely that it is derived from Elamite nap or napir meaning "god" (see Napirisha).
Napirisha m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This is the epithet of the god Humban and he was almost exclusively known by this name in later times. It means "Great God" in Elamite, derived from Elamite nap or napir "god" combined with Elamite risha or rišarra "great" (also compare Elamite rishair)... [more]
Narundi f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Narundi was the goddess of victory and thus we can consider her to be a war goddess. It is uncertain what the meaning of her name was in the Elamite language. She, along with the goddesses Shiashum and Niarzina, was said to be a sister of the 'great goddess', namely Kiririsha... [more]
Nergal m Near Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
In Mesopotamian mythology he is a deity of Akkad, Assyria, and Babylonia, with the main seat of his cult at Cutha, represented by the mound of Tell-Ibrahim. He is the son of Enlil and Ninlil, and is sometimes associated with Shamash... [more]
Ngeshtin-ana f Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology she is a minor goddess of wine and colde seasons known as the 'heavenly grape-vine', who is also considered a divine poet and interpreter of dreams. She is the daughter of Enki and Ninhursag, sister of Dumuzid, and consort of Ningisida.
Niarzina f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. It is uncertain what the meaning of her name was in the Elamite language, though the second part of her name may have been derived from Elamite sina or zini meaning "(the) lady"... [more]
Nikarawa f Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a Luwian goddess, known from various inscriptions in Carchemish. She has been linked by some scholars to the Mesopotamian goddess Ninkarrak, however this is not a universally accepted theory.
Nikkal-wa-ib f Near Eastern Mythology
The ancient Middle Eastern goddess of orchards, whose name is derived the Akkadian / West Semitic "´Ilat ´Inbi", meaning "Goddess of Fruit". Alternatively, it may mean "Great Lady and Fruitful".
Ninatta f Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain, although it is speculated that Ninatta's name derives from Ninêt, the Amorite name for the city of Nineveh. Tentative links have also been made with a goddess identified as Ishtar of Ninêt... [more]
Nindumgul f & m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "lord/lady of the mooring pole", deriving from the Sumerian element nin. Nindumgul was a sukkal (vizier deity) for the goddess Nungal.
Ninegal f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Meaning uncertain. Name borne by a minor Sumerian goddess associated with royal palaces.
Ningikuga f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of the pure reed" in Sumerian.... [more]
Ningirsu m Sumerian Mythology, History (Ecclesiastical), Literature
Means "Lord of Girsu (a city in Ancient Sumer)", deriving from the Sumerian element nin ("lord"). Another name for the Sumerian god of war Ninurta, who was possibly worshipped under this name in the city of Girsu itself... [more]
Ninka'ašbaranki f Sumerian Mythology
Means "mistress who makes decisions for heaven and earth", deriving from the Sumerian elements nin ("queen, mistress, lady"), ka-aš-bar ("decision"), 𒀭 an ("heaven"), and 𒆠 ki ("earth")... [more]
Ninkarrak f Near Eastern Mythology
Possibly means either "Lady of Karrak" (from Sumerian element nin) or "Lady of the harbour" (from Sumerian element kar). Other Assyriologists have asserted that Ninkarrak is more likely to be a deity from a culture that pre-dated the Sumerian and Akkadian cultures, who was assimilated into Sumerian religion, meaning that her name originates from a language that is thus far unknown... [more]
Ninkasi f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Likely means "mistress of beer", derived from the Sumerian elements nin ("lady") and kaš ("beer, alcoholic beverage"). As a goddess of beer, Ninkasi was associated with the production and consumption of beer, and all of the positive and negative effects that came with it.
Ninkiaĝnuna f Sumerian Mythology
Means "mistress beloved by the prince", deriving from the Sumerian elements nin ("queen, mistress, lady"), ki-áĝ ("beloved"), and nun ("prince, noble"). Attested as another name for the goddess Sadarnunna.
Ninkusi f Sumerian Mythology, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of gold", deriving from the Sumerian elements nin ("lady or mistress") and kù-sig ("gold"). Attested as a Sumerian name for the goddess Shalash.
Ninmah f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "great queen" in Sumerian. Another name of Ninhursag. ... [more]
Ninme f Sumerian Mythology
Means "lady of battle", deriving from the Sumerian elements nin ("queen, mistress, lady") and me (an archaic word for "battle"). This is attested as an epithet of Inanna, in her capacity as a war goddess... [more]
Ninshubur f Sumerian Mythology
Possibly means "Lady of Subartu", deriving from Sumerian element nin, and shubur (Sumerian form of Subartu, a kingdom in Upper Mesopotamia referenced in three of the Amarna Letters). Ninshubur was a 'sukkal' (vizier) to the goddess Inanna.
Ninsi'anna f & m Sumerian Mythology
Ancient Sumerian god or goddess of Venus. The name means "divine lady, illumination of heaven" or "divine lady of the redness of heaven".
Ninsuhzagina f Sumerian Mythology
Means "lady of the diadem of lapis lazuli", deriving from the Sumerian elements nin ("lady or mistress"), aga ("diadem, circlet, crown"), and naza-gìn ("lapis lazuli, precious stone")... [more]
Nintinugga f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "mistress who revives the dead". Nintinugga was a Mesopotamian medicine goddess, who was also associated with the underworld. Nintinugga was primarily worshipped in Nippur.
Nintu f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady of birth" in Sumerian. Another name of Ninhursag
Nintur f Sumerian Mythology
The name of the Sumerian mother goddess, derived from nin meaning "lady, queen" and tur meaning "hut", with allusions to the word šà-tùr meaning "womb".
Ninudishara f Sumerian Mythology, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "lady who amazes the world", deriving from the Sumerian elements nin ("lady or mistress"), u-di ("admiration, amazement"), and šár ("all, totality, world"). Attested as a Sumerian name for the goddess Shalash.
Ninura f Sumerian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology, likely deriving in part from the Sumerian element nin ("queen, mistress, lady"). Name borne by a tutelary goddess of Umma, who was considered to be the consort of the god Shara.
Ninuwawi f Hurrian Mythology
Means "she of Nineveh". This was an epithet of the Hurrian goddess Sauska that was also possibly used in reference to the goddess Ishtar.
Nisaba f Sumerian Mythology
Derived from the Sumerian element 𒉀 naga, meaning "wheat". Nisaba was the Sumerian goddess of writing, learning, and the harvest. She was considered a patron goddess of scribes.
Nisroch m Semitic Mythology, Biblical
The Assyrian god of agriculture, in whose temple king Sennacherib was worshiping when he was assassinated by his own sons in revenge for the destruction of Babylon (2 Kings 19:37; Isa... [more]
Nun-baršegunu f Sumerian Mythology
Means "lady whose body is the flecked barley", deriving from the Sumerian elements 𒊺 se ("barley, grain") and gùnu ("dappled, spotted, speckled"). This was an alternative name of the Sumerian deity Nisaba, the goddess of grain and writing, that was used specifically in relation to her capacity as an agricultural goddess.
Nungal f Sumerian Mythology
Means "great princess", deriving from the Sumerian elements gal ("mighty, great") and nun ("noble, prince"). Nungal was the Sumerian goddess of prisons, who was also associated with the underworld.
Oesho m Near Eastern Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a Kushan deity associated with wind and high places, primarily worshipped between the 2nd and 6th centuries CE. Oesho is associated today with the Hindu god Shiva, and the Zoroastrian deity Vayu-Vata.
Pentikalli f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
The Hurrian form of Belet-ekallim, which was itself the Akkadian name for the goddess Ninegal... [more]
Pidenḫi f Hurrian Mythology
Means "she of Piten". This was a Hurrian epithet for the goddess Shalash, referring to her cult center in Piten (also written as Bitin).
Pidray f Semitic Mythology, Ugaritic Mythology
Etymology uncertain. Possibly derives from the Semitic element pdr ("to scatter/spread"). Another possible origin is the element bqr ("lightning"). A Hurrian origin for her name has also been speculated, specifically from the element pedari ("bull")... [more]
Pinikir f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of the most important goddess in Elamite religion. It is uncertain what the meaning of her name was in the Elamite language. Pinikir started out as the mother-goddess (in which capacity she was also the goddess of love and fertility), making her rank above all Elamite gods - even the male ones... [more]
Pišaišapḫi m Hurrian Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Means "he of Mount Pišaiša". Name borne by a Hurrian mountain god also worshipped as part of the Hittite and Ugaritic pantheons. He is recorded as receiving offerings alongside the goddesses Suwala, Sauska, and Ninegal... [more]
Qadeshtu f Near Eastern Mythology
Canaanite and Phoenician form of Qetesh.
Resheph m Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Derived from Semitic ršf meaning "to absorb, to consume" or "to burn" (descended into Hebrew as רשף (reshef) "burning heat" or "plague"). This was the name of a Canaanite and Semitic deity of plague, the underworld, and war.
Ruda m Near Eastern Mythology
The meaning "well disposed", Ruda is a moon god worshipped in North Arabian tribes of pre-islamic Arabia.
Runtiya m Near Eastern Mythology, Luwian Mythology
The name is possibly derived from a word for "horn" or "antler", but all the etymologies which have been proposed to date are problematic. Name borne by a Luwian god of hunting, who was often invoked alongside the goddess Ala... [more]
Sadarnunna f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology, Sadarnunna was a minor Sumerian goddess, considered to be the wife of Nuska. Nuska was a "sukkal" (vizier deity) for the god Ea.
Šala f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of the consort of Adad, often considered to be a minor goddess of non-Mesopotamian origin, potentially related to crop fertility. The etymology of her name is unknown, but may be from the Hurrian šāla meaning "daughter".
Sarpanit f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Babylonian mother goddess and wife of Marduk. Her name means "the shining one" or may be derived from zēr-bānītu meaning "creatress of seed".
Šarrāḫītu f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "the glorified one" in Akkadian, deriving from the verb šarāḫu ("to make proud, to glorify"). Name borne by a goddess whose cult center was based in Uruk. The oldest attestations of her name connect her with the goddess Asratum.
Šarruma m Near Eastern Mythology
Meaning "king of the mountains". Šarruma or Sharruma is originally a Hurrian god who was adopted into the Hittite pantheon.
Šauška f Hurrian Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Means "the great one" or "the magnificent one", deriving from the Hurrian element šavuši ("great, big"). Name borne by the Hurrian goddess of love, war, and healing. She was later associated with the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar, and was also incorporated into the Hittite pantheon.
Savuska f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Hurrian goddess mentioned by the Assyrian king Sargon II.
Šerida f Sumerian Mythology
The Sumerian name of the dawn goddess Aya. While the etymology is uncertain, one suggested root is the Akkadian šērtum, meaning "morning".
Šertapšuruḫi f Hurrian Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a daughter of the god of the sea Kiaše in Hurrian and Hittite mythology. She became the wife of the god Kumarbi.
Shala f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Mesopotamian corn goddess who is also associated with war as well as the name of a Sumerian goddes of grain and the emotion of compassion.... [more]
Shalash f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
Etymology uncertain. Shalash was a goddess worshipped in the Hurrian, Eblaite, and Babylonian pantheons. She was considered to be the consort of the god Dagon. In the Hurrian tradition Hepat was their daughter, and Shalash was worshipped as a part of the Kaluti (or offering lists) of both Hepat and Sauska... [more]
Shapash f Semitic Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of the Canaanite goddess of the sun, that was also worshipped as part of the Ugaritic pantheon.
Shara m Near Eastern Mythology
In Sumerian mythology Shara is a minor god of war, mainly identified with the city of Umma, north-east of Unug (Uruk). He is identified in some texts as the son of Inana (Ishtar).
Shatiqatu f Semitic Mythology, Ugaritic Mythology
Means "she who causes evil to pass away", deriving from the Akkadian element šūtuqu ("averting evil, disease, misfortune"). Name borne by a minor Ugaritic deity mentioned only in the Epic of Kirsa.
Sherida f Near Eastern Mythology, Dutch, Literature, Popular Culture
Sumerian goddess, consort of Utu.... [more]
Shiashum f Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of a goddess in Elamite religion. It is uncertain what the meaning of her name was in the Elamite language. Not much is known about Shiashum, unfortunately. It is said that she, along with the goddesses Narundi and Niarzina, was a sister of the "great goddess", namely Kiririsha... [more]
Shimti f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "fate".... [more]
Shullat m Near Eastern Mythology
Etymology uncertain, possibly deriving from the Akkadian šullatum ("despoilment"), although this etymology is contested. Name borne by a minor god of destruction, that was always invoked alongside his twin Hanish.
Shuzianna f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
Means "the just hand of heaven", deriving from the Sumerian elements šu ("hand, portion, share"), an ("heaven, sky"), and the genetive suffix na. Name borne by a Mesopotamian goddess that was mainly worshipped in Nippur... [more]
Siduri f Near Eastern Mythology, Hurrian Mythology
Attested as an epithet for several Hurrian goddesses, as well as the Mesopotamian goddess Ishtar. It is possibly derived from the Hurrian word šiduri, meaning "young woman". Another proposed origin is from the Akkadian šī-dūrī ("she is my protection")... [more]
Simut m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
In the Elamite pantheon, Simut was a herald god - although there are also sources who claim that he was a tutelary god (with one source even speculating that he might have been an astral deity). It is uncertain what the meaning of his name was in the Elamite language... [more]
Šintal-wuri f Hurrian Mythology
Means "seven-eyed", deriving from the Hurrian elements šindi ("seven") and fur=i ("eye"). Name borne by a goddess associated with Sauska, who is mentioned as part of her entourage in several offering lists.
Siris f Near Eastern Mythology
Mesopotamian goddess of beer and the mother of Zu; a large bird that can breathe fire and water.... [more]
Sudaĝ f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology
A Sumerian name for the Akkadian dawn goddess Aya, meaning "To be shining" or "precious metal".
Šuwala f Hurrian Mythology
Of unknown meaning. Šuwala was a Hurrian goddess of the underworld, often linked in contemporary texts with the goddess Nabarbi.
Šuwaliyat m Hittite Mythology
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving from a same root as Suwala. Šuwaliyat was a Hittite storm god, considered to be the older brother of and advisor to Tarhunna.
Tadmuštum f Near Eastern Mythology
Name borne by a Mesopotamian goddess associated with the underworld, often thought of as the daughter of Nergal. The etymology is uncertain, although possible elements have been identified in both Akkadian (dāmasu meaning "to humble" or dāmašu meaning the interrogative form of "cover up") and Ge'ez (damasu meaning "to abolish, destroy, hide").
Tallay f Semitic Mythology, Ugaritic Mythology
Means "dewy", deriving from the Ugaritic element ṭl ("dew"), combined with the feminine suffix y. Name borne by a weather goddess, considered to be a daughter of the god Baal.
Tappinu f Near Eastern Mythology
Means "her daughter" in Hattian. The Hattian name for the minor Hittite goddess Mezulla.
Tashmetum f Near Eastern Mythology
Variant form of Tasmetu, also translated as "the lady who listens".
Tašmetu f Near Eastern Mythology
Ancient Mesopotamian goddess of wisdom and sexual attractiveness.
Telipinu m Near Eastern Mythology
Means "excited son" in Hattic. He was a Hittite god who most likely served as a patron of farming, though he has also been suggested to have been a storm god or an embodiment of crops.
Tešimi f Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
Of uncertain etymology. Name borne by a Hittite goddess, who was likely of Hattian origin. She was thought to be the lover of the storm god of Nerik.
Tirutir m Near Eastern Mythology, Elamite Mythology
This was the name of an obscure god in Elamite religion. It is uncertain what the meaning of his name was in the Elamite language. Tirutir was a local god (1): he was worshipped only in the Elamite city Ayapir (2) (also spelled Aiapir; it was later called Malamir, and nowadays it is known as Izeh in Iran (3))... [more]
Tishtrya m Near Eastern Mythology, Persian Mythology
This was the name of a Zoroastrian deity, who at first was responsible for bringing rainfall and fertility, but later became an astral deity that was associated with what is now the star Sirius. The name may have been derived from Avestan tištriia, which in turn came from púṣiya (via dissimilation) "he who makes prosper" or from Indo-European tri-str-o-m "group of three stars".
Ülgen m Medieval Turkic, Medieval Mongolian, Near Eastern Mythology
Means "magnificent" in Old Turkic. ... [more]
Ülger m & f Turkish, Medieval Turkic, Near Eastern Mythology, Medieval Mongolian
Derived from "Ülker", the Pleiades; and "Ülgen", a Turkic creator-deity from Tengrism, an ethnic Turkic, Yeniseian, Mongolic religion.... [more]
Uliliyašši f Hittite Mythology, Luwian Mythology
Deriving in part from the Hittite element ulili ("field"). Name borne by a goddess of vegetation and fertility, known from Hittite ritual and oracle texts.
Usuramassu m & f Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian Mythology, Sumerian
Means "Heed His Word". Originally a given masculine name, it was also the name of a minor Babylonian god, considered to be the son of Adad. Later, Usuramassu was viewed as a female deity of justice, however she was still a child of Adad... [more]
Uttu f Near Eastern Mythology
Sumerian goddess of weaving whose name means "spider".
Wurunšemu f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Hattian goddess whose name may potentially mean "Mother of the land".
Yarikh m Near Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology
Derives from the Ugaritic yariḫ ("moon"). Name borne by a moon god worshipped in the Amorite and Ugaritic pantheons, and later as part of the Phoenician and Punic pantheons following the collapse of Ugarit... [more]
Zašḫapuna f Near Eastern Mythology, Hattian Mythology
Of uncertain etymology, possibly deriving in part from the Hattic element puna ("child"). Name borne by a Hattian goddess, who was the patron deity of the city of Kaštama.
Zemelo f Near Eastern Mythology
The name of a Thraco-Phrygian earth goddess, probably derived from the same root as Russian zemlya "earth, soil" (also carries the sense of "the Otherworld"). This might be the origin of Semele.
Zintuḫi f Near Eastern Mythology, Hittite Mythology
The name of a minor Hittite goddess of Hattian origin, whose name means "granddaughter". She was part of a triple deity with her mother Mezulla and the sun goddess of Arinna.
Zisutra m Sumerian, Near Eastern Mythology
Variant of Ziusudra. A Sumerian priest-king during the great flood.
Ziusudra m Near Eastern Mythology, Sumerian
Meaning, "life of long days." The name of a king listed in the Sumerian king list; listed as the last king of Sumer prior to the deluge and subsequently recorded as the hero of the Sumerian flood epic... [more]