History Submitted Names

These names are used primarily to refer to historical persons. They are not commonly used by other people.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABERKIOSmAncient Greek, History
Meaning unknown. Borne by the 2nd Century bishop who is written about in the Inscription of Abercius.
ABRAfLiterature, History, Theology, Biblical
Possibly a feminine form of Abraham. It coincides with a Latin word meaning "maid". A known bearer was Saint Abra of Poitiers, a Gallo-Roman nun of the 4th century.... [more]
ABROCOMASmHistory
Latinized form of the given name Aβρόκoμας (Abrokomas) or (Habrokomas), which is either the hellenized form of an unknown Persian given name, or a genuine Greek given name. In case of the latter, the name is probably derived from Greek ἁβροκόμης (habrokomēs) meaning "with delicate hair" as well as "with luxuriant foliage"... [more]
ADALOLPHEmHistory (Gallicized)
French form of Adalwolf via the Latinized form Adalolphus.
ADARNASEmGeorgian (Archaic), History
Georgian form of Adurnarseh, probably via its hellenized form Adarnases. This name was borne by a medieval king of Abkhazia and by several princes of Iberia and Tao-Klarjeti (also in medieval times).
ADIL-GIRAYmHistory
From Arabic عَادِل (ʿādil) meaning "just, fair" (see Adil) combined with the Turkic title giray denoting a khan of Crimea. A notable bearer was Adil Khan Giray, the khan of the Crimean Khanate from 1666-1671.
AELIANmEnglish, History
English form of Aelianus. A bearer of this name was Claudius Aelianus - often called Aelian in English - a Roman author and philosopher from the 3rd century AD.
AEMILIANmEnglish, History
English form of Aemilianus. This name was borne by a Roman Emperor from the 3rd century AD.
ÆTHELWALDmAnglo-Saxon, History
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwold. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwald Moll, an 8th-century king of Northumbria.
AGATHOmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Agathon. This name was borne by a 7th-century pope.
AGATHOKLEIAfAncient Greek, History
Feminine form of Agathokles. This name was borne by an Indo-Greek queen from the 2nd century BC.
AGESILAUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Agesilaos. This was an epithet of the Greek god Hades, as well as the name of two kings of Sparta.
AGESIPOLISmAncient Greek, History
The first element of this name is either derived from Greek ἆγειν (agein) meaning "to carry, to fetch" or from Greek ἄγω (ago) "to guide, to lead" (also see Agis). The second element is derived from Greek πόλις (pólis) meaning "city, city state"... [more]
AGISmAncient Greek, History
Derived from the Greek verb ἄγω (ago) meaning "to lead, to guide" as well as "to bring, to carry". It is closely related to the Greek verb ἡγέομαι (hegeomai) meaning "to go before, to lead (the way)" as well as "to guide"... [more]
AIDRICmHistory, English
From the Germanic name Aldric. This was the name of a 9th-century saint.
AKSILmBerber, Northern African, History
Means "cheetah" or "leopard" in Shawiya Tamazight. This was the real name of Kusaila (كسيلة), a 7th-century Berber king.
ALAVIVUSmAncient Germanic (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Alaviv. Alavivus was a leader of the Thervingi (a Gothic tribe), who lived in the 4th century AD.
ALBINIANUSmAncient Roman, History
Roman cognomen which was derived from Albinius. A bearer of this name was Lucius Sestius Quirinalis Albinianus, a Roman proquaestor and suffect consul from the 1st century BC.
ALGIRDASmLithuanian, History
Basically has the (more or less) figurative meaning of "he who hears everything", derived from Lithuanian al meaning "everything, every last one" combined with the Lithuanian noun girdas meaning "rumour", which is ultimately derived from the Lithuanian verb girdėti meaning "to hear"... [more]
ALPAÏDEfHistory
This name belonged to the concubine of Pépin II, majordomo of Austrasia.
AMALAFRIDAfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Amalfrida. Amalafrida was a daughter of Theodemir, king of the Ostrogoths in the 5th century AD.
AMALASWINTHAfAncient Germanic, Dutch, History
Derived from the Germanic elements amal "work" and Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength." This name was borne by a daughter of Theodoric the Great, who became queen of the Ostrogoths after his death in 526 AD.
AMASISmAncient Egyptian (Hellenized), History
Variant form of Άμωσις (Amosis), which is the hellenized form of the ancient Egyptian name IaH-ms or I'h-ms meaning "son of Iah". It is composed of the name of the Egyptian god Iah combined with the word mes "son" or mesu "be born"... [more]
AMBIORIXmAncient Celtic, History
Continental Celtic name, derived from Celtic ambio "enclosure" (or ambi "around, about" or ambitio "rich") combined with Celtic rix "king." This was the name of one of the two kings of a Gaulish tribe called the Eburones, who was famous for revolting against Julius Caesar in 54 BC (which eventually led to the extermination of the Eburones).
AMERICUSmHistory
Latin form of Amerigo.
AMMIANUSmLate Roman, Late Greek (Latinized), History
From the late Roman cognomen Ammianus, which is of uncertain origin and meaning, but it is noteworthy that all of the bearers known to history are of Byzantine Greek descent. As such, the original form of the name must have been Ἀμμιανός (Ammianos), which thus means that Ammianus is a latinization of the original name.... [more]
AMPSICORAmSardinian (Rare), History
Hampsicora was a native Sardinian chieftain who guided the antiroman revolt in 215 b.C.
ANACAONAfHistory, Mexican
Means "golden flower" in Taíno, from ana "flower" and caona "gold". This was the name of the cacica (a female cacique, or queen) who ruled the native Taíno (Arawak) people of the Caribbean island of Hispaniola when the conquistadors settled there in 1492... [more]
ANALEʻAfHawaiian, History
Meaning uncertain. It was borne by Hawaiian chiefess Analeʻa Keohokālole (1816-1869), the mother of Queen Liliʻuokalani.
ANAXANDERmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Anaxandros. This name was borne by a king of Sparta (Greece) from the 7th century BC.
ANAXANDRIDASmAncient Greek, History
Extended form of Anaxandros. This name was borne by two kings of Sparta.
ANAXIDAMUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Anaxidamos. This name was borne by a king of Sparta (Greece) from the 7th century BC.
ANDRIANAMPOINIMERINAmMalagasy (Rare, Archaic), History
Andrianampoinimerina (1745–1810) ruled the Kingdom of Imerina from 1787 onwards, initiating the unification of Madagascar after more than seven decades of civil war. Therefore he is regarded as a cultural hero and holds near mythic status among the Merina people, being considered one of the greatest military and political leaders in the history of Madagascar.
ANDRISCUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Andriskos. This was the name of the last king of Macedon, who lived in the 2nd century BC.
ANGADRESMAfMedieval French (Latinized, ?), History
Saint Angadresma (or Angadrisma) was a 7th-century abbess and miracle worker venerated in Beauvais, France.
ANNEMUNDmHistory
From the Germanic name Aunemund, in which the second element is mund "protection". Saint Annemund was a 7th-century archbishop of Lyon; Queen Balthild had him assassinated, according to Bede.
ANSPRANDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Ansbrand. Ansprand was the name of an 8th-century king of the Lombards.
ANTHIAfHistory
Possibly a variant of Anthea. This name was borne by a 2nd-century Illyrian saint who was martyred with her son Eleutherius during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Hadrian. It was also used by Xenophon of Ephesus for the lover of Habrocomes in his 2nd-century novel 'An Ephesian Tale' (one of the sources for Shakespeare's 'Romeo and Juliet').
ANTIOCHmLiterature, History
English form of Antiochus. The capital city of Syria bore this name, an important centre in early Christianity (founded c.300 BC by Seleucus I Nictor and named for his father, Antiochus). The name was used by J. K. Rowling in her 'Harry Potter' series of books, where it belongs a minor character.
ANUARITEfCentral African (Rare), French (African, Rare), History
Used very rarely. Best known as the name of the Blessed Marie-Clémentine Anuarite Nengapeta (1939-1964), a Congolese nun who was killed during the Congo Crisis at the age of 24 years and was beatified by Pope John Paul II in 1985... [more]
APOLLODOTUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Apollodotos. This name was borne by an Indo-Greek king from the 2nd century BC.
AQUALTUNEfHistory
Meaning unknown. According to legend, the name of a former Angolan princess and general, who commanded an army of 10,000 men to fight the invasion of her kingdom in the Congo.
ARABIAfArabic, History
The Arabian Peninsula, this was the name of the daughter of the Byzantine emperor, Justin II.
ARCHIDAMUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Archidamos. This name was borne by five kings of Sparta (Greece).
ARDAGASTmMedieval Slavic, History
The meaning of the first element of this name is unknown to me, but the second element is probably derived from Slavic gost "guest". Also note the resemblance to the Germanic name Arbogast... [more]
ARDARICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Hardaric, with reduction of the 'h.' Ardaric was the name of a 5th-century king of the Gepids, a Germanic tribe.
AREGUNDfAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Aragund. Aregund was the name of the wife of Chlothar I, a 6th-century Merovingian king of the Franks.
AREUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Areios. This name was borne by two kings of Sparta, both of whom lived in the 3rd century BC.
ARIAMNESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Possibly an abbreviated form of Ariaramnes. This was the name of a satrap of Cappadocia, who lived in the 4th century BC.
ARIARAMNESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Ariyāramna. This was the name of the paternal great-grandfather of Darius the Great.
ARIARATHESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of an Old Persian male name, of which the first element is derived from Old Persian aryā "Aryans". The second element is not really certain, but may have been derived from Old Persian wratha "joy"... [more]
ARIASPESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Of ancient Persian origin, but the meaning is unknown to me at this time. This was the name of one of the three legitimate sons of King Artexerxes II Mnemon, who lived in the 4th century BC.
ARIOALDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Ariwald. Arioald was the name of a 7th-century king of the Lombards.
ARIOBARZANESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of the Old Persian name *Arya-bṛz-ana- which possibly meant "making the Aryans great", of which the first element is derived from Old Persian aryā "Aryans". The second element is not really certain, perhaps *brzi- "high"... [more]
ARIPERTmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Aribert. Aripert I was a 7th-century king of the Lombards in Italy.
ARISTOBULUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Aristoboulos. This name was borne by several kings and princes of Judea, as well as a Greek philosopher and a Greek historian.
ARISTONICUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Aristonikos. This name was borne by a king of Pergamon, as well as several ancient Greek scholars.
ARIULFmAncient Germanic, History
Variant form of Arulf. Ariulf was the name of a 6th-century duke of Spoleto (Italy).
ARNOALDmHistory (Archaic), Medieval English (Archaic)
Variant of Arnold. Arnoald (ca. 540/560 – ca 611) was a Bishop of Metz between 601 and 609 or 611.
ARRHABAEUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of the ancient Greek given name Ἀρραβαῖος (Arrhabaios), which is also found spelled as Arrhibaios. The meaning of the name is uncertain. The first element of the name may possibly consist of the Greek prefix ar meaning "not, without" (similar to the word arrhythmia), whereas the second element might possibly be related to the Greek verb ῥαβάσσω (rhabasso) "to make a noise"... [more]
ARRHIDAEUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of the ancient Greek given name Ἀρριδαῖoς (Arrhidaios), which might possibly be a variant form of the Greek given name Ἀρραβαῖος (Arrhabaios) (see Arrhabaeus)... [more]
ARSAMESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Aršāma. This was the name of the paternal grandfather of Darius the Great, who possibly may briefly have been King of Persia.
ARTABANUSmAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Artabānu via its Greek form Artabanos. This name was borne by at least four kings of Parthia.
ARTABAZUSmAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Artavazda via its Greek form Artabazos. This name was borne by two Persian satraps from Phrygia.
ARTAPHERNESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Artafarnah. This was the name of a brother of King Darius I of Persia.
ARTAVASDESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Variant hellenization of Artavazda (also compare Artabazos). This name was borne by three ancient kings of Armenia.
ASELLAfHistory, Spanish
Possibly a feminine diminutive of Asce (see Ascelina). Saint Asella was a Roman hermitess who died c. 406.
ASTYAGESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Old Persian Ishtovigu or Ištovigu, which apparently derives from Old Iranian rishti vaiga, meaning "swinging the spear". This was the name of a Median king, who lived in the 6th century BC.
ATAHUALPAmHistory, Incan
This was the name of the last emperor of the Inca Empire, prior to the Spanish conquest of Peru. He was captured and eventually executed by conquistadors. Argentine singer Atahualpa Yupanqui (1908-1992) was a known modern bearer of this name.
ATHALARICmAncient Germanic, History
Form of Adalric. This name was borne by a king of the Ostrogoths in the 6th century AD, who was a grandson of Theodoric the Great.
ATHANAGILDmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Gothic athn or atathni "year" (or possibly a derivative of athala "noble") combined with Gothic gild "sacrifice." Athanagild was a 6th-century king of Visigothic Hispania.
ATROPATESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Āturpāt. This name was borne by a Persian satrap from the 4th century BC.
AUDOFLEDAfAncient Germanic, History
Derived from the Germanic element auda "wealth, property" (also see Audovacar) combined with flâdi "beauty, respectability." Audofleda was the wife of Theodoric the Great, a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths.
AUFIDIAfAncient Roman, History
Feminine form of Aufidius. A bearer of this name was Aufidia, a daughter of the Roman magistrate Marcus Aufidius Lurco. Her own daughter, Livia Drusilla, would later become Roman Empress (as the wife of Emperor Augustus).
AUFIDIUSmAncient Roman, History, Literature
From the Roman nomen gentile Aufidius, which is of uncertain origin and meaning. The first element, au, may have been derived from the Latin preverb au "away, off", but it could also have been a phonetic variant of the Latin preverb ab "from"... [more]
AURELIANmEnglish, Dutch, History, Romanian, Swedish (Rare), Danish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare), German (Rare)
Form of Aurelianus (see Aureliano). This name was borne by a Roman emperor from the 3rd century AD.
AURIWANDALOmAncient Germanic (Lombardic), History
Lombardic cognate of Ēarendel. The name is attested as the name of a historical Lombardic prince.
AUSTRECHILDfAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Austrahild. It might also be a variant spelling of Austregild, but that is less likely. Austrechild was the third wife of Guntram, a 6th-century king of Burgundy.
AVENTINEmHistory
Anglicised form of Aventin, or English form of Aventinus.
BADERICmAncient Germanic, History
Means "powerful battle", derived from the Germanic elements badu "battle" and rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." Baderic was a 6th-century co-king of the Thuringii, a Germanic tribe.
BALTHILDfAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Baldhild. Balthild was the wife of Clovis II, a 7th-century Merovingian king of Neustria and Burgundy.
BARISANmHistory
This name was first found in Northern Italy (Tuscany and Liguria, to be precise). Its meaning and etymological origin is unknown, though it is probably related to the name of the Italian town of Barisano, which was named Castrum Barisani (meaning "Barisan's castle") in its earliest records... [more]
BASILIDESmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Basileides. This name was borne by Basilides the Epicurean, an ancient Greek philosopher from the 2nd century BC.
BASINAfMedieval French, Medieval German, History
Basina (c. 438 – 477) was a queen of Thuringia in the middle of the fifth century.
BATHILDAfEnglish (Rare), German, History
Variant of Bathild. This was the name of a 7th-century English saint who became queen of the Franks after being sold to them as a slave. She was canonised for fighting against the slave trade, promoting monasticism and founding a convent... [more]
BÉLINEfFrench (Rare), Literature, Theatre, History
Diminutive of Isabelle or derived from Belle "beautiful". It was used by Molière in his play 'The Imaginary Invalid' (1673), where it belongs to the wife of Argan. It was also the name of an 8th-century virgin martyr, Saint Béline from Landreville in Aube, France.
BELISARIUSmGreek (Latinized), History
From Greek Βελισάριος (Belisarios), probably of Illyric origin. This was the name of a famed Byzantine general and war hero who served the emperor Justinian. He was possibly of Slavic ancestry which has led to speculation that the name derives from Slavonic Beli-tzar "white prince" (the -sarius element being interpreted as coming from the old Slavic word tsesar or tsesari, which was derived from Caesar, thus giving Belisarius a "princely" connotation), but this etymology has since been discounted as somewhat dubious.
BENENmHistory
Benen was the name of the first Irish Bishop of Ireland, who was a follower of St. Patrick. ... [more]
BERTEFLEDEfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Bertefleda. Berteflede was a daughter of Charibert I, a 6th-century Merovingian king of Paris.
BERTHILDEfAncient Germanic, Dutch, English, German, History
Variant of Berthild. Berthilde lived in the 7th century AD and was one of the five wives of Dagobert I, king of the Franks.
BERTRADAfAncient Germanic, History
Feminine form of Bertrad. Bertrada of Laon lived in the 8th century AD. She was the wife of Frankish king Pepin the Short and mother of Charlemagne.
BIETTEfFrench (Rare), Medieval French, History
Perhaps from Bietta, the Romansch form of Beata. ... [more]
BILICHILDfAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Bilihild. Bilichild was the wife of Childeric II, a 7th-century Frankish king.
BILLFRITHmHistory
Saint Billfrith is a famous bearer.
BILTRUDEfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Biltrud. Biltrude was the wife of Grimoald, an 8th-century duke of Bavaria.
BOHEMONDmHistory, Medieval
From Italian Buamundo, which is of uncertain meaning. According to the Norman historian Orderic Vitalis it was derived from Latin Buamundus, the name of a mythical Gigas (giant), originally given as a nickname to the crusader prince Bohemond I (christened Mark; c. 1058-1111) by his father because he was extremely large at birth.
BORTEfHistory, Medieval Mongolian
This was the name of the first wife of Temujin, better known as Genghis Khan, the founder of the Mongol Empire. Borte, or Börte, became the head of the first Court of Genghis Khan, and Grand Empress of his Empire.
BRASIDASmAncient Greek, History
Derived from Greek βράσις (brasis) meaning "boiling". Brasidas was the name of a Spartan officer from the 5th century BC.
BRIDEImPictish, History
Name of seven Kings of the Picts.
BRIOCmHistory
Derived from Briocus, a Latinate form of Breton Briog.... [more]
BROMERUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of the Greek given name Βρόμερος (Bromeros), which might possibly have been derived from Greek βρομέω (bromeo) meaning "to buzz". Also compare Greek βρόμος (bromos), which can mean "any loud noise" as well as "stench, bad smell"... [more]
BRUDUSmPictish, History
Brudus was a leader of the Picts.
CÆLINmHistory
Cælin was an Orthodox priest in England in the seventh century, and brother of St. Cedd of Lastingham.... [more]
CAESARIONmAncient Greek, Ancient Roman, History
Latinized form of Greek Καισαρίων (Kaisarion), which in turn was a Hellenized form of Caesar with the Greek diminutive suffix -ιων (-ion) added to it. As such, the name essentially meant "little Caesar"... [more]
CALLINICUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Kallinikos. Throughout history, this name has been borne by several men, such as kings, princes, martyrs and saints.
CAMISSARESmAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Kamisares (also spelled Kamissares), which is the hellenized form of an ancient Persian male name. Its meaning is currently unknown to me. This was the name of an Achaemenid satrap from the 4th century BC.
CARINUSmLate Roman, History
Extended form of Carus. This name was borne by a Roman emperor from the 3rd century AD.
CARRIARICmAncient Germanic, History
This name might be derived from Gothic kara "worry" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." (The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler.") But it is probably a form of either Hariric or Gararic... [more]
CARRIARICOmHistory
Spanish form of Carriaric.
CARTIMANDUAfHistory, Ancient Celtic
Celtic name, in which the second element is mandu "pony, colt, filly". The first element is less certain, perhaps from karti "drive out", or it may mean "clean, sleek". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Brigantes.
CARUSmAncient Roman, History
Derived from Latin carus "dear, beloved." This name was borne by a Roman Emperor from the 3rd century AD.
CASSANDANEfAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Κασσανδάνη (Kassandanē), the Hellenized form of an uncertain Old Persian name. Cassandane was an Achaemenian Persian noblewoman and the "dearly loved" wife of Cyrus the Great.
CASSIODORUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), Late Roman, History
Latinized form of Kassiodoros. A well-known bearer of this name was Cassiodorus, a Roman statesman and writer from the 6th century AD.
CATANESmAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Katana via its Greek form Katanes.
CATUVOLCUSmAncient Celtic (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Catuvolcos. A bearer of this name was Catuvolcus, one of the two kings of a Gaulish tribe called the Eburones. In 54 BC, he committed suicide by poisoning himself.
CHARARICmAncient Germanic, History
This name is most likely a form of Hariric - however, this is not completely certain. The first element in the name might also be derived from (or is a blend with) garva "ready, prepared", Gothic gairu "spear" or from Old High German wachar "vigilant." Chararic was a 5th-century king of the Salian Franks.
CHARIBERTmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Herbert. Charibert I was a Merovingian king who ruled in the 6th century AD.
CHARILAUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Charilaos. This was the name of the Spartan king who embraced the Minoan legislation for Sparta in the 8th century BC.
CHILDEBERTmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Hildebert. Childebert I was a Merovingian king who ruled in the 6th century AD.
CHILDEBRANDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Hildebrand. Childebrand was an 8th-century Frankish duke, the son of Pepin of Herstal and brother of Charles Martel.
CHILDERICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Hilderic. Childeric I was the Merovingian king of the Salian Franks in the 5th century AD.
CHILPERICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Hilperic. Chilperic I was a Merovingian king of Neustria (or Soissons) in the 6th century AD.
CHINDASWINTHmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German chind "child" combined with Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength." Chindaswinth was a 7th-century king of the Visigoths in Hispania.
CHLODIOmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German hlûd "famous." Chlodio lived in the 5th century AD and was a Merovingian king of the Salian Franks.
CHLODOMERmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German hlûd "famous" combined with Old High German mâri "famous." Chlodomer lived in the 6th century AD and was one of the four sons of Clovis I, king of the Franks.
CHLODORICmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German hlûd "famous" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." Chlodoric lived in the 6th century AD and was the son of Sigobert the Lame, a Frankish king of Cologne.
CHLODOSINDfAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German hlûd "famous" combined with Gothic sinths "way, path." Chlodosind lived in the 6th century AD and was a daughter of Chlothar I, a Frankish king from the Merovingian dynasty.
CHLOTHILDEfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Chlothild. Chlothilde was the wife of Clovis I, a Merovingian king of the Franks.
CHNODOMARmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Cnodomar. Chnodomar was the name of a 4th-century king of the Alamanni, a Germanic tribe.
CHROTILDAfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Chrothild. Chrotilda was the daughter of Clovis I (a Frankish king) and wife of Amalaric, a 6th-century king of the Visigoths.
CINGETORIXmAncient Celtic, History
Derived from Celtic cingeto "marching men, warriors" combined with Celtic rix "king." This name was borne by one of the four kings of Kent in 54 BC.
CISSAmAnglo-Saxon, History
Meaning unknown. One source theorizes that the name might possibly be derived from Old English cisse meaning "gravelly place" or from Old English cís meaning "fastidious". Even Old Norse kyssa meaning "to kiss" was suggested by this source, but this seems unlikely, given that this name is Anglo-Saxon in origin.... [more]
CLEOMENESmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Kleomenes. Cleomenes was the name of a king of Sparta (Greece) from the 6th century BC.
COMMODUSmLate Roman, History
Derived from the Latin word commodus, which can mean "suitable, convenient, opportune" as well as "full, complete, of full weight". The word is ultimately derived from Latin com "with, together" and modus "measure, manner"... [more]
CONOMERUSmLate Roman, History
Latin transcription of CONOMOR
CONOMORmBreton Legend, History, Medieval Breton (?)
From a Brythonic name, possibly *Cunomāros, derived from Common Celtic *kwon- "hound" or *kuno- "high" and *māros ‎"great". This was the name of Conomor the Cursed, a 6th-century king of Domnonée (modern-day northern Brittany) notorious for his cruelty, who was ultimately excommunicated at the behest of Saint Samson of Dol... [more]
CONRADINmHistory, Romansh, Literature
English spelling and Romansh form of Konradin.... [more]
CONVENmHistory, Breton
From the Breton name Konwenn meaning "white dog" or "white warrior", derived from kon, singular (or plural? genitive?) of ki "dog, warrior" (compare Tanguy, Cunobelinus) combined with gwenn "white"... [more]
CORIOLANUSmAncient Roman, History, Literature
Roman cognomen which was derived from Corioli, the name of an ancient but now lost Volscian city. Although derived from the Volscian language, it is not known what the meaning of the city's name was in Volscian... [more]
COTISOmRomanian (Rare), History
Cotiso was the name of a Dacian king (approximately 30 BC) who ruled the mountains between Banat and Oltenia (modern-day Romania).
CROVANmHistory
Meaning uncertain, perhaps from Middle Irish crobh bhan "white hand". This was the byname of Godred Crovan (d. 1095), an 11th-century Norse conqueror who ruled the Isle of Man. It has been interpreted as a mocking reference to Godred's supposed habit of wearing white gauntlets into battle and aversion to getting his hands dirty in combat.
ČUČIMIRmSerbian (Archaic), History, Medieval Serbian
Medieval Serbian name of which the first element is of uncertain origin. It may possibly have been derived from Slavic chucha or chusha, which may signify something small. An other possibility may be Slavic chuzh "foreign, alien, strange" - compare modern Russian chuzhoy, Polish cudzy and Slovak cudzí, all of which mean "foreign, alien, strange"... [more]
CUNIMUNDmEnglish, German, History
Variant of Kunimund. Cunimund was a 6th-century king of the Gepids, a Germanic tribe.
CUNIPERTmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Kunibert. Cunipert was the name of a 7th-century king of the Lombards.
CUTHREDmAnglo-Saxon, History
Means "famous counsel", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English ræd meaning "counsel".... [more]
CYAXARESmAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Kyaxares, which is the hellenized form of the Old Persian male name Hvakhshathra or Uvakhšatara. The meaning of the name is uncertain. This was the name of a Median king from the 6th century BC.
CYNETHRYTHfAnglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English cyne meaning "royal" combined with Old English þryð meaning "strength".... [more]
CYRENIAfHistory
Feminine form of Cyrenius. This was the name of a saint from the Roman province of Cilicia in southern Anatolia, who was martyred by burning in 306 at Tarsus, in persecutions of Galerius.
DABIUSmHistory
St. Dabius, or Davius, Confessor, was an Irish missionary to Scotland. He was part of the great monastic missionary effort in the British Isles, and then in Europe.
DAGOBERTmAncient Germanic, Dutch, German, History, Louisiana Creole
Means "bright day", derived from the Germanic element daga "day" combined with Old High German beraht "bright." Dagobert I was a 7th-century Merovingian king of Austrasia, the Franks, Neustria and Burgundy.
DAMYAfBerber, Northern African, History
Tamazight feminine given name, an alternative possible given name of the Berber warrior-queen and leader Kahina.
DANGEROSEfHistory
Possibly a Latinized form of a Germanic name. This was borne by the maternal grandmother of Eleanor of Aquitaine.
DATAPHERNESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Datafarnah. This was the name of a Persian general from the 4th century BC.
DELYANmHistory, Bulgarian
Means "business, work" from Old Church Slavonic дѣлати (dělati) "to work, to do". A famous bearer was Peter II (Delyan), a Tsar of Bulgaria.
DEMARATUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Demaratos. This name was borne by a king of Sparta, who lived in the 5th century BC.
DEVOTAfHistory
Means "devoted" in Latin, perhaps taken from the phrase Deo devota "devoted to God". Devota is the patron saint of Monaco.
DIADUMENIANmBulgarian, English, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, History
Bulgarian, English, Polish, Russian and Ukrainian form of Diadumenianus. A well-known bearer of this name was the Roman Emperor Diadumenian, who reigned in the 3rd century AD.
DIHYAfBerber, Northern African, History
Meaning unknown. This was the real name of Kahina, an Amazigh warrior queen who resisted Arab expansion into North Africa.
DIZIERmMedieval French, History
Medieval French variant of Désiré. This was the name of a 6th-century French saint.
DOMALDmHistory
This name was most notably borne by Domald of Sidraga (c. 1160-1243), a powerful Dalmatian nobleman and feudal lord who for several years was Prince of the city of Split, which was (and is) located in what is nowadays Croatia... [more]
DONALBAINmLiterature, History
Anglicized form of Gaelic Domnall Bán meaning "Domnall the Fair", a nickname of Donald III, King of Scots, the second known son of Duncan I. This was the form used by Shakespeare in his tragic play 'Macbeth' (1606) for a character based on the historical figure, who allegorically represents moral order.
DRACULAmHistory, Literature, Popular Culture
Essentially means "son of Dracul" in Romanian, with Dracul being the Romanian word for "dragon". It refers to the 15th-century Wallachian prince Vlad III the Impaler, whose father was named Vlad II Dracul and so Dracula was a nickname of sorts for Vlad III... [more]
DUMNORIXmAncient Celtic, History
Continental Celtic name meaning "king of the world", derived from Celtic dumno "world, universe" combined with Celtic rix "king." This name was borne by a chieftain from Gaul, who lived in the 1st century BC.
EADBALDmAnglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English beald meaning "bold".... [more]
EADGIFUfAnglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English giefu meaning "gift" (see Godiva and Sunniva).... [more]
EADHILDfAnglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English hild meaning "battle". In other words, you could say that this name is the Anglo-Saxon cognate of Audhild.... [more]
EADWALDmAnglo-Saxon, History
Derived from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and weald "rule". A known bearer of this name was Eadwald of East Anglia, a king of East Anglia from the 8th century AD.
EBORICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Eburic. Eboric was the name of a 6th-century Suebi king of Galicia.
EBROINmEnglish, History
English form of Eberwin. Ebroin was the name of a 7th-century mayor of the palace of Neustria.
EINHARDmAncient Germanic, History
Short form of Eginhard. Einhard was a Frankish monk, historian and courtier of Charlemagne.
ELFINmMedieval English, History
This was the name of an obscure local saint venerated in medieval Warrington, a town in the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia. It is allegedly a British derivative of Latin Alpinus (see Alpin; also Elphin, Alvin).
ELIANORAfSardinian, History
Sardinian form of Eleonora.... [more]
ENDELIENTAfHistory
Latinized form of an unknown Celtic name, possibly Welsh Cenheidlon or Cynheiddon. This was the name of a 5th- or 6th-century Cornish saint whose birth name is lost. According to tradition she was a Welsh princess, daughter of King Brychan, who went to Cornwall as a Christian missionary.
EPANDERmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Epandros. This was the name of an Indo-Greek king from the 1st century BC.
EPHRAEMmBiblical (Latinized), Jewish (Latinized), History
Latinized form of the Hebrew name 'Efrayim via its hellenized form Ephraim.
EPICHARISfHistory, French (Rare, Archaic)
Epicharis (d. 65) was an Ancient Roman freedwoman and a member of the Pisonian conspiracy against the emperor Nero.... [more]
EPIPHANIAfHistory, Ancient Greek
Original form of Epifania. This was the name of an 8th-century Italian saint from Pavia.
ERARICmAncient Germanic, English, History
Derived from Old High German êra "honour, respect" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." Eraric was the name of a king of the Ostrogoths who had gotten to reign only briefly; he was murdered a few months after being crowned king in 541 AD.
ERCHINOALDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Ercanald. Erchinoald was a 7th-century mayor of the palace of Neustria and Burgundy.
ERELIEVAfAncient Germanic (Gothic), History
Derived from Old High German êra "honour, respect" and Old High German liub "dear, beloved". Erelieva was the wife of Theodemir, king of the Ostrogoths (in the 5th century AD), and mother of Theodoric the Great.
ERMANARICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant form of Erminric. Ermanaric lived in the 4th century AD and was a king of the Greuthungi, a Gothic tribe.
ERMENBERGAfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Erminburg. Ermenberga was the daughter of Witteric (a 7th-century king of the Visigoths in Hispania) and wife of Theuderic II (king of Burgundy and Austrasia).
ERYXOfAncient Greek, History
Eryxo was a Queen of Cyrenaica and was a member of The Battiads dynasty, the family that ruled Cyrenaica and Cyrene. From the ancient Greek sources, she appears to be the first Greek Cyrenaean Queen mentioned from the dynasty.... [more]
ETEANDERmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of the given name Ἐτέανδρος (Eteandros). This was the name of a king of the city-kingdom of Paphos (located on the Greek island of Cyprus), who lived in the early 7th century BC... [more]
ETHELINDfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Adelind. Ethelind was the name of one of Charlemagne's concubines.
EUBULUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), Biblical, History
Latinized form of Euboulos. This was the name of an Athenian statesman, who lived in the 4th century BC.
EUNOMUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Eunomos. This name was borne by a Spartan king from the 8th century BC.
EURICmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German êwa "time, age, law" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." However, this name can also be a short form of Eburic... [more]
EURYCRATESmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Eurykrates. This name was borne by a Spartan king from the 7th century BC.
EURYCRATIDESmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Eurykratides. This name was borne by a Spartan king from the 7th century BC.
EURYSTHENESmAncient Greek, History
Means "wide strength", derived from Greek ευρυς (eurys) "wide" combined with Greek σθενος (sthenos) "vigour, strength". This name was borne by a Spartan king from the 10th century BC.
EUTHARICmAncient Germanic, History
The meaning and origin of the first element is rather uncertain: we know that it comes from eutha, but we don't exactly know where eutha itself comes from. But there are a few possibilities... [more]
EXPEDITUSmLate Roman, History
From the Latin past participle of expidere "make fit or ready, prepare", literally "free the feet from fetters". This was the name of an obscure, semi-legendary saint, who is invoked against procrastination.
FARABERTmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Langobardic fara "family, line, kind" or Gothic faran "to travel" combined with Old High German beraht "bright." Farabert was King of the Franks in the 2nd century AD.
FAROALDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Farawald. Faroald I was a 6th-century duke of Spoleto (Italy).
FASTRADAfAncient Germanic, History
Feminine form of Fastrad. Fastrada (765-794 AD) was the fourth wife of Charlemagne and had borne him two children.
FENENNAfBiblical, Theatre, History, Medieval Polish
Variant of Phenenna borne by the 13th-century Polish princess Fenenna of Kuyavia, who married King Andrew III of Hungary. ... [more]
FERDULFmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Fardulf. Ferdulf was the name of an 8th-century duke of Friuli (Italy).
FREDEGARmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Fridegar. Fredegar was a 7th-century Burgundian writer who had started "The Chronicle of Fredegar."
FREDEGUNDfAncient Germanic, English, History
English form of Fridegund. Fredegund was the Queen consort of Chilperic I, a 6th-century Frankish king from the Merovingian dynasty.
FRITIGERNmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Fridegern. Fritigern, who died circa 380 AD, was a leader of the Thervingi, a Germanic tribe.
FRUMARmAncient Germanic, History
Short form of Frumaher. Frumar was the name of a 5th-century Suebi king of Galicia.
FURSEYmAncient Irish, History
Possibly derived from Latin virtus "virtue" via Old Irish firt. Saint Fursey was an early medieval Irish monk and visionary whose "celebrated visions had considerable influence on dream literature of the later Middle Ages", including Dante's 'Divine Comedy'.
GALSWINTHAfAncient Germanic, History
Derived from the Germanic element gal, which comes from galan "to sing." The second element is derived from Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength." Galswintha was a daughter of Athanagild, a 6th-century king of Visigothic Hispania.
GAURAVmIndian, Hinduism, History
Means "pride" in Sanskrit.
GEBERICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Gebaric. Geberic was the name of a 4th-century king of the Goths, a Germanic tribe.
GEDIMINASmLithuanian, History
Variant form of Gedminas. This name is best known for being the name of a 14th-century Grand Duke of Lithuania. Other Lithuanian bearers of this name include the former prime minister Gediminas Kirkilas (b... [more]
GEISERICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Gaiseric. Geiseric the Lame was king of the Vandals and the Alans in the 5th century AD.
GELIMERmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Geilmer. Gelimer was a 6th-century king of the Vandals and Alans.
GERBERGAfAncient Germanic, History, Medieval German
Variant of Gariburg. Gerberga was the name of the second wife of Charlemagne.
GERSWINTHAfAncient Germanic, History
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic gairu (gêr in Old High German) "spear", or from garva (garo in Old High German, and gearu in Anglo-Saxon) "ready, prepared." The second element is derived from Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength." Gerswintha was the name of one of Charlemagne's concubines.
GESALECmAncient Germanic, History
Form of Giselaic. Gesalec was the name of a 6th-century king of the Visigoths.
GIBULDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant short form of Gebavultus. Gibuld was the name of a 5th-century king of the Alamanni, a Germanic tribe.
GISELHERmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from the Germanic element gisel "hostage" (or "pledge") combined with Old High German hari "army." Giselher was a 5th-century king of Burgundy.
GISELTRUDfAncient Germanic, History
From the Germanic elements gisil meaning "hostage" or "pledge" and þruþ "strength". It was borne by the wife of Aistulf.
GISTEMARmAncient Germanic, History
Form of either Gismar or Giselmar. Gistemar was a 7th-century mayor of the palace of Neustria and Burgundy.
GISULFmAncient Germanic, History
The meaning and origin of the first element is rather uncertain: we know that it comes from gis (the original form was possibly gîs), but we don't exactly know where gis itself comes from... [more]
GOBRYASmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Gaubaruva. This name was borne by several Persian noblemen; one of them was both the father-in-law as well as the brother-in-law of Darius the Great.
GODEPERTmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Godebert. Godepert was a 7th-century king of the Lombards in Italy.
GODIGISELmAncient Germanic, English, German, Italian, Norwegian, History
Variant spelling of Godegisel. Godigisel was a 4th-century king of the Hasdingi Vandals.
GOISWINTHAfAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Gothic gavi "region, district" or Gothic gauja "inhabitant" combined with Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength." Goiswintha was the wife of Athanagild, a 6th-century king of the Visigoths.
GONTRÃOmHistory
Portuguese form of Guntram.
GORGOfAncient Greek, History
Most likely derived from Greek γοργός (gorgos) meaning "grim, fierce, terrible". However, it's also possible that the name is derived from the Greek verb γοργεύω (gorgeuō) meaning "to move rapidly, to hasten", which itself is related to the Greek noun γοργία (gorgia) meaning "agility, nimbleness, mobility"... [more]
GOTARZESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Gōdarz, an ancient Persian male name of unknown meaning. This name was borne by two kings of Parthia.
GRANUAILEfHistory
From Irish Gaelic Gráinne Mhaol meaning "Bald Gráinne". This was a nickname of the 16th-century female pirate Gráinne Ní Mháille (known in English as Grace O'Malley), given in reference to her close-cropped hair as a young woman.... [more]
GRASULFmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from the Germanic element gras (or grasan) "grass, herb, plant" combined with Gothic vulfs "wolf." Grasulf II was a 7th-century duke of Friuli (Italy).
GRIFOmAncient Germanic (Frankish), Medieval Italian, History
Derived from the noun grifo, which means "griffin" in both Italian and Old High German. In turn, it is derived from the Latin noun gryphus, which itself is ultimately derived from the Greek noun γρύψ (gryps) --- see Griffin.... [more]
GRIMOALDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Grimwald. Grimoald I was a 7th-century king of the Lombards, a Germanic people.
GRUOCHfMedieval Scottish, History
Meaning unknown. This was the name of the wife of King Macbeth of Scotland. She was immortalized as Lady Macbeth in the Shakespeare play Macbeth, though the facts about her are few.
GUBAZESmAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Greek Γουβάζης (Goubázēs) or Γωβάζης (Gōbázēs), which itself is the hellenized form of an ancient Persian compound name. The original Persian form of the name is unclear, as is its meaning... [more]
GUNDEMARmAncient Germanic, History
Means "famous war", derived from Old High German gund "war" combined with Old High German mâri "famous." Gundemar I was a 7th-century king of the Visigoths in Hispania.
GUNDERICmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old High German gund "war" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." Gunderic was a 5th-century king of the Vandals and Alans.
GUNDOBADmAncient Germanic, Dutch, German, Polish, Swedish (Archaic), History
Variant spelling of Gundebad. Gundobad was a 5th-century Burgundian king.
GUNDOMADmAncient Germanic, History
The first element of this Germanic name comes from Old High German gund "war." The meaning and origin of the second element is rather uncertain: we know that it comes from mâtha but we don't exactly know where mâtha itself comes from... [more]
GUNDOMARmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Gundemar. Gundomar I was a 5th-century king of Burgundy.
GUNTHAMUNDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Gundamund. Gunthamund was a 5th-century king of the Vandals and Alans.
HERMAEUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Hermaios. This name was borne by an Indo-Greek king from the 1st century BC.
HERMANFRIDmAncient Germanic, English, History
Variant spelling of Ermanfrid. Hermanfrid lived in the 6th century AD and was the last independent king of the Thuringii, a Germanic tribe.
HERMERICmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Hermenric or a variant of Ermeric. Hermeric was the name of a 5th-century Suebi king of Galicia.
HILDEPRANDmAncient Germanic, History
Variant spelling of Hildebrand. Hildeprand the Useless was an 8th-century king of the Lombards.
HILDERICmAncient Germanic, History
Derived from Old Norse hildr "battle" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler." Hilderic was king of the Vandals and the Alans in the 6th century AD.
HILDIKOfHistory
The last wife of Attila the Hun. According to the Eastern Roman diplomat Priscus of Panium, Attila died on their wedding night (453 AD).... [more]
HIMILTRUDEfAncient Germanic, History
Variant of Himiltrud. Himiltrude was the name of the first wife of Charlemagne.
HISTIAEUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Histiaios. This name was borne by a tyrant of Miletus, who lived in the early 5th century BC.
HORMIZDmAncient Persian, History
Possibly a variant form of Hormazd. This name was borne by six Persian kings of the Sassanid Empire.
HOSTILIANmEnglish, History
English form of Hostilianus. This name was borne by a Roman emperor from the 3rd century AD.
HUGOBERTmAncient Germanic, History, German
Variant of Hugubert. A known bearer of this name was the 7th-century Merovingian senechal Hugobert, whose daughter Plectrude was married to the Frankish statesman Pepin of Herstal.
HUNERICmAncient Germanic, English, History
The meaning and origin of the first element in this Germanic name is rather uncertain, and so there are various possibilities to the name's meaning. The most likely possibility is that the first element refers to the Huns, who derive their name from Germanic hûn "giant." Other possibilities are Old Norse hûnn "bear cub" and Celtic kuno "high." It's also possible that the first element is a blend of hûn with Gothic kuni "family, kin, race, kind" (see Kunibert)... [more]
HYRCANUSmHistory
Means "of Hyrcania", Hyrcania being a Greek form of the Persian name Verkâna, which meant "wolf-land" and referred to a historical region in Persia. Hyrcanus was a member of the Hasmonean dynasty, the Jewish High Priest and King of Judea in the 1st century BC.
HYSTASPESmAncient Persian (Hellenized), History
Hellenized form of Vishtaspa. This was the name of the father of Darius the Great.
IAfHistory
Meaning unknown. Saint Ia was a 5th-century Cornish virgin martyr, an Irish princess, according to popular tradition, who travelled to Cornwall as a missionary and was martyred on the River Hayle under Tudur Mawr, ruler of Penwith... [more]
ILDIBADmAncient Germanic, Dutch, English, German, Norwegian (Archaic), Swedish (Archaic), History
Variant spelling of Hildebad. Ildibad was a 6th-century king of the Ostrogoths in Italy.
ILLIDIUSmHistory
Latin form of Allyre.
ILLTUDmHistory
Anglicized form of Illtyd.... [more]
INGUNDfAncient Germanic, History
Derived from the name of the Norse god Ing combined with Old High German gund "war." The first element might also refer to the Ingaevones, a Germanic tribe mentioned by Tacitus in his "Germania." Ingund was the third wife of Chlothar I, a Frankish king from the Merovingian dynasty.
INÍONfHistory
Simply from the Irish word iníon meaning "daughter" (the modern form of Old Irish ingen; see also Innogen). Iníon Dubh (literally "dark daughter") was the nickname of Fionnghuala MacDonald, the Scottish-born mother of Red Hugh and Rory O'Donnell, the last two kings of Tyrconnell.
IOTAPAfAncient Persian (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Yutâb via its hellenized form Iotape. Throughout history, this name was borne by a queen and several princesses.
IRENARCHUSmHistory
Apparently means "peace ruler" from Greek. It was borne by an Orthodox saint from Sebaste, Armenia who was martyred by beheading in the year 303, under Diocletian, as well as the Russian Orthodox saint Irenarch of Rostov (1547-1616).
ISANNAHfHistory, Literature
Isannah was the name of one of Paul Revere's daughters who died in infancy. It was later used by Esther Forbes in her 1943 historical fiction novel 'Johnny Tremain.'... [more]
ISHImNative American, History
Ishi means "man" in the Yana language.
JEROBOÃOmHistory
Portuguese form of Jeroboam.
JOGAILAmLithuanian, History
Derived from the Lithuanian verb joti meaning "to ride horseback" combined with old Lithuanian gailas, which usually means "strong, potent" but has also been found to mean "sharp, jagged" as well as "angry, fierce, violent" and "miserable, sorrowful, remorseful"... [more]
JOVETAfHistory
Possibly related to Jovita or Iveta. This was the name of a 12th-century princess of the Crusader kingdom of Jerusalem, who, because she had been captured by Turks as a child, was considered too tainted to make a suitable marriage and was sent off to become abbess of the convent at Bethany... [more]
JUTHWARAfHistory
Anglo-Saxon corruption of Brythonic Aud Wyry, meaning "Aud the Virgin" (see Aude; though, according to Baring-Gould, Aud is 'from the Welsh Aidd, "zeal, warmth, ardour", cognate to the Irish aed, ead (see Áed) and the Gaelic eud')... [more]
KARAĐORĐEmHistory
Means "black George" derived from Turkish kara meaning "dark, black" combined with the name Đorđe. This was the nickname of Đorđe Petrović (1762-1817), the founder of modern Serbia and a leader who aimed at separating Serbia from the Ottoman Empire.
KASHYAPmIndian, History
kashyap was a saint the word "kashmeer" came from Kashyap-meer means kashyap's pond, Accordind to hindu mythology the whole world is created again and again and every time its own creater. every such creation/recreation is called "Kalpa" for this Kalpa "Brahma" is creater, so as Kashyap was creater of an earlier Kalpa.... [more]
KAÐLÍNfAncient Scandinavian, History
Old Norse form of Caitlín which occurs in 'Landnámabók', belonging to a daughter of Göngu-Hrólfr (Rollo the Ganger).
KATONAHmNative American, History
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of a 17th-century Native American leader, the sachem (chief) of the Munsee-speaking Ramapo people in present-day western Connecticut. A hamlet in the town of Bedford, New York is named for him.
KELAGASTmMedieval Slavic, History
The meaning of the first element of this name is unknown to me, but the second element is probably derived from Slavic gost "guest". This name was borne by a South Slavic nobleman from the 6th century AD.
KHOSROVmArmenian, History
Armenian form of Khosrau. This name was borne by four client kings of Armenia.
KORMLÖÐfAncient Scandinavian, History
Old Norse form of Gormlaith. This name appears in 'Landnámabók' for Kormlöð, daughter of Kjarvalr, an Irish king.
KUBLAImHistory
Meaning unknown. This was the name of Kublai Khan, a ruler of the Mongol Empire and the grandson of Genghis Khan.
LAGERTHAfHistory (?), Popular Culture, Norwegian
Likely a latinization of Old Norse Hlaðgerðr. According to legend, Lagertha was a Viking shieldmaiden from what is now Norway and the first wife of the famous Viking Ragnar Lodbrok.
LAGUSmAncient Greek (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Lagos. This was the name of one of the sons that Ptolemy I Soter I had with his lover Thais, as well as the name of Ptolemy's possible biological father.
LAIDULFmAncient Germanic, History
The first element comes from Old High German leid "hostile, unfriendly" or from Old High German leitjan "to lead, to rule." The second element is derived from Gothic vulfs "wolf." Laidulf was the name of a 10th-century prince of Capua (Italy).
LANDRADAfAncient Germanic, History
Feminine form of Landrad. Landrada of Austrasia lived in the 7th century AD and was reportedly a daughter of Charles Martel (Frankish king) and his wife Rotrude of Treves.
LANDRYm & fEnglish, French, History
English and French form of Landric. St. Landry of Sées was a French bishop who died in the 5th century AD.