Medieval English Submitted Names

These names were used by medieval English peoples.
gender
usage
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
Abbatissa f Medieval English (Latinized, Rare)
From Latin abbatissa meaning "abbess". While this was more usually found as a title, there are a handful of English occurrences of it used as a given name. Also compare the Old English masculine name Abbud.
Acris m Medieval English
Middle English vernacular form of Zacharias.
Adbrei m Medieval English
Of debated origin and meaning.... [more]
Adcock m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
Adecock m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
Adelie f English (Rare), Medieval English
Anglicized form of Adélie and medieval English short form of Adelicia.
Adeliza f Medieval English, Old Swedish
Medieval English and Old Swedish form of Adelais. The second wife of Henry I of England bore this name.
Adelo m Medieval English, Medieval French
Derived from Old High German adal "noble", or a short form of names beginning with this element. Also compare the feminine equivalent Adela.
Adelund m Medieval English
Created with the element adel meaning "noble."
Adie m Medieval English
Medieval pet form of Adam.
Adkin m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
Admiral m American (Rare), Medieval English
From the English word admiral meaning "a commander of a fleet or naval squadron, or a naval officer of very high rank".
Admiranda f Medieval English
Derived from Latin admirare "to admire".
Adred m Medieval English
A name with unknown etymology with historical usage in medieval Europe.
Adulf m Medieval English, Medieval Polish
Medieval English variant of Adolph and Medieval Polish variant of Adolf.
Æffic m Medieval English
Diminutive of Afa.
Ældiet f Medieval English
Variant of Ealdgyð found in Domesday Book.
Aelesia f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Alicia.
Aeleva f Medieval English
Younger form of Old English Ælfgifu created with the Germanic elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and ewa meaning "ever." Compare Aelfeva.
Aellic m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and lic with the contested meaning of "like" or "body."
Aelod m Medieval English
Variant of Adelold, possibly a form of Adalwald or Æthelwold.
Ælric m Medieval English
Variant of Æthelric or Ælfric; see also Elric.
Aethelsi m Medieval English
Variant of Æthelsige recorded in Domesday Book.
Æthelwin m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æþelwine (see Æthelwine), which itself is a variant of Æðelwine.
Æthelwold m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwald. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwold of East Anglia, a 7th-century king of East Anglia.
Affery f Literature, Medieval English
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Old English origin. It may be related to Avery or Aphra. Affery Flintwinch is a character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Little Dorrit' (1855-7).
Agacia f Medieval English
Variant of Agatha (compare medieval French Agace).
Agenet m Medieval English
Possibly a medieval diminutive of names beginning with the Old French element agin, a lengthened form of Proto-Germanic *agjō "blade" (e.g. Agenulf; see Aginulf).
Agenilda f Medieval English
Medieval English cognate of Agenilde.
Agenwulf m Medieval English
Perhaps a variant of Aginulf. Also see Einulf.
Agneli m Medieval English, Medieval Scandinavian
From the Nordic name elements ag meaning "edge of sword, blade" and nelli.
Aicusa f Medieval English
Of unknown origin and meaning.
Ailbern m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of unknown Germanic element ail and Germanic element bern meaning "bear."
Aildag m Medieval English, Anglo-Norman
Possibly from Adaldag or its Old English cognate Ætheldæg.
Aileva f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Æðelgifu.
Ailova f Medieval English
Apparently from an unattested Old English name composed of the elements æðele "noble" and lufu "love".
Ailwi m Medieval English
Coalescence of several Old English names: Æðelwig "noble battle", Ealdwig "ancient battle", and Ælfwig "elf battle".
Aisil m Medieval English
Perhaps a misspelling of Ailsi, a form of Æthelsige. This name 'occurs nowhere else outside Domesday Book', according to the Prosopography of Anglo-Saxon England.
Aistan m Medieval English
Possibly from the gothic verb áistan "to reverence."
Aiulf m Lombardic, Medieval English, Anglo-Norman
A Germanic name formed from the name elements agin "edge (of a sword)" and wolf "wolf" (see Aginulf).... [more]
Akile m Medieval English
Possibly early transcription of Akhilleus.
Alberia f Medieval English
Derived from the Old German names Alberga and Albergia which ultimately derive from the name Ethelburga.
Albray f Medieval English
Vernacular form of Albreda.
Albrea f Medieval English (Latinized)
Feminization of both Albericus and, in early medieval times, of Alfred.
Albreda f Medieval German, Medieval English
Medieval German feminine form of Alberich.
Alcude m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements al "noble" and cude from the element cueth meaning "famous."
Aldeva f Medieval English
From the Old English name Ealdgifu.
Aldfrith m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Aldfrid.
Aldusa f Medieval English, Anglo-Norman (?)
Latinized form (strictly feminine) of Aldus. It was recorded in Yorkshire in 1219.
Aldwif f Medieval English
Derived from Old English ealdwif "old woman".
Aleva f Medieval English
Middle English form of Æðelgifu.
Alfgar m Medieval English, Medieval Scandinavian
Anglo-Scandinavian form of Alfgeirr, or a medieval form of Ælfgar.
Alfgrim m Medieval English, Medieval Scandinavian
Anglo-Scandinavian name, derived from the Old Norse elements alfr meaning "elf" and gríma meaning "mask, helmet".
Alfkil m Medieval English, Old Danish
Old Danish and Anglo-Scandinavian form of Alfkæll.
Alfsi m Medieval English
Younger form of Ælfsige.
Alfwy m Medieval English
Medieval form of Ælfwig.
Algeard m Medieval English
From either of the Old English names Ælfgeard or Æthelgeard. The former name was composed of the Old English elements ælf "elf" and geard "protector"; the latter was derived from æðele "noble" and geard.
Algeat m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Old English Ælfgeat or Old Norse Algautr.
Alicie f Medieval English, Portuguese (Brazilian, Modern, Rare)
Late medieval English variant of Alicia and Brazilian variant of Alícia.
Alienore f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Eleanor.
Alina f Medieval English
Diminutive of Alice.
Alionore f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Eleanor.
Aliot m Medieval English
Diminutive of Ellis or Elias.
Alisaunder m Scots, Medieval English, Literature
Scots form and medieval English variant of Alexander. 'King Alisaunder' or 'Kyng Alisaunder', dating from the end of the 13th century or the early 14th century, is a Middle English romance or romantic epic telling the story of Alexander the Great's career from his youth, through his successful campaigns against the Persian king Darius and other adversaries, his discovery of the wonders of the East, and his untimely death.
Alisoun f Medieval English, Literature
Variant of Alison. This is the name of the Wife of Bath in Geoffrey Chaucer's 'The Canterbury Tales'.
Aliva f Medieval English
Medieval form of Æðelgifu.
Almod m Medieval English, Old Norse
Old Norse younger form of Almóðr.
Alnuar m Medieval English
Medieval name of uncertain origin.
Alric m Medieval English
Combination of elements al meaning "noble" and ric "power, ruler."
Alsabell f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Isabel via the variant Assabell.
Alsi m Medieval English
Younger form of Ælfsige.
Alstan m Medieval English
Medieval form of any of the Old English names Æðelstan, Ælfstan, Ealdstan or Ealhstan.
Altei m Medieval English
Medieval Latinized form of an uncertain name, perhaps a misspelling of Ælfheah or *Ealdheah.
Alveva f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Ælfgifu.
Alwaker m Medieval English
Medieval form of Old English Æthelwacer or Ælfwacer.
Alward m Medieval English
A medieval form of Æthelweard.
Alware f Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Alwaru, itself a variant of Ælfwaru or Æthelwaru.
Alweis f Medieval English, Anglo-Norman
Variant of Alvice. This spelling occurs in Domesday Book.
Alwold m Medieval English
Variant of Ælfweald. This spelling is used in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle to refer to Ælfwald I, king of the Northumbrians from 778 or 779 to 788.
Alwulf m Medieval English
Combination of elements al "noble" and wulf "wolf."
Alwynn f Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Late Old English variant of Ælfwynn and Æthelwynn.
Amalgar m Frankish, Medieval English
Derived from the Old German elements *amal "vigorous, brave" and ger "spear".
Ambi m Medieval English, Norwegian
Old Norse short form of Arnbjǫrn.
Ameria f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories include a feminine form of Old French Amauri (see Amaury).
Amerie f Medieval English, English (Rare)
Late medieval variant of Ameria. It was revived in the 1800s.... [more]
Amia f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinization of Amy via the variant Amya.
Ammot f Medieval English
Diminutive of Amice.
Amya f Medieval English
Quasi-Latinization of Amy.
Anchoret f Medieval English
Early Anglicization of Welsh Angharad.
Anilla f Medieval English
Contracted form of Anabilla.
Ankarette f English (British, Archaic), Medieval English
Medieval English form of Welsh Angharad (compare Anchoretta).
Annot f Medieval English, Medieval French
Medieval diminutive of Ann a short form of Annes (see Annis), Annora, and Alianora... [more]
Anot f Medieval English
Diminutive of Agnes.
Ansculf m Old Norman, Anglo-Norman, Medieval English
Derived from the Old High German elements asc meaning "ash tree; spear" and wolf meaning "wolf", or possibly a variant form of the Old English name Æscwulf; the first element was altered due to the influence of Old High German ansi meaning "god, deity"... [more]
Ansger m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Ansgar.
Anstice f English (British, Rare), Medieval English
Transferred use of the surname Anstice, which was derived from the medieval given name Anastase or Anastayse (from Latin Anastasius), or from its feminine equivalent Anastasie (from Latin Anastasia).
Ape m Medieval English, Finnish
Finnish pet form of Abram 1, Abraham, Abel, Albin, Arne 1, Amos, and Aron.
Archebold m Medieval English
Medieval variant spelling of Archibald
Archel m Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Arnketil.
Aretius m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Aretias.
Argentina f Spanish, Medieval English, Portuguese (Brazilian), Italian (Rare)
From Argentina, the name of a country in South America. It is derived from the Latin argentum (silver), which in turn comes from the Ancient Greek ἀργήντος (argēntos), from ἀργήεις (argēeis), "white, shining"... [more]
Arnbrand m Medieval Scandinavian, Medieval English, Norwegian (Archaic)
Anglo-Scandinavian name derived from the Old Norse elements ǫrn "eagle" and brandr "fire, sword-blade".
Arngrim m Medieval English, Norse Mythology
Anglo-Scandinavian variant of Arngrímr. This was the name of a berserker in Norse mythology; he figures in Hervarar saga, Gesta Danorum, Lay of Hyndla, a number of Faroese ballads, and Örvar-Odds saga.
Arnwin m Medieval English
From Old English Earnwine, derived from Old English earn "eagle" and wine "friend".
Asmoth f Medieval English, Old Danish
Old Danish form of Ásmóð, derived from the Old Norse elements áss "god" and móðr "temperament, excitement, wrath".
Asulf m Medieval English, Old Swedish, Old Danish
Old Swedish and Old Danish form of Ásulfr.
Athela f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Adela.
Athelm m Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
From Æthelm, a reduced form of Æthelhelm. This name was borne by Athelm (died 926), an archbishop of Canterbury and uncle of Saint Dunstan.
Athelston m Medieval English, English (Rare), Literature
Medieval variant of Æthelstan, which is still in use today. In literature, this is the name of the eponymous character of the Middle English verse romance Athelston (14th century), the author of which is unknown.... [more]
Athulf m Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Contraction of Æðelwulf. Also compare Adulf.
Atkin m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
Auti m Medieval English
Old Danish form of Autir.
Avelin m Medieval English
Diminutive of the Ancient Germanic names Avo and Avi (compare also Ava, Aveline and Evelyn).
Avelyn f English (Modern, Rare), Medieval English
Variant of Aveline first used in medieval England and eventually revived in the 20th century.
Avenel m Medieval English
Originally derived from the same, highly uncertain, source as Avo and Ava 3, Avenel was first in use as a given name in the Middle Ages, and later went on to become a surname (which, in turn, was occasionally re-used as a given name from the 1500s onwards).
Avilina f Medieval English
Medieval variant of Avelina 1.
Awdry f Medieval English
Possible precursor to Audrey?
Aylwin m Medieval English
Middle English form of Æðelwine.
Azo m Medieval English
Possibly related to Azzo.
Azur m Medieval English, Biblical
Son of Eliakim, mentioned briefly in the Genealogy of Jesus in Matthew 1:13-14.
Bab f Medieval English
Diminutive of Barbara.
Baldith f Medieval English
Medieval English from of Bealdgyð
Balki m Medieval English, Old Norse, Old Norwegian
From Old Norse balkr meaning "beam, rafter, ridge of land."
Barbary f Manx, Medieval English, English (Archaic)
English vernacular form and Manx regular form of Barbara.
Barbata f Neapolitan, Medieval English
Feminine form of the Latin cognomen Barbatus.
Bardolph m Theatre, Medieval English (?)
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the elements bard, meaning "small axe" or "beard", and wulf "wolf". Shakespeare used it for minor characters in several plays.
Bark m Medieval English, Old Swedish
Old Swedish form of Bǫrkr.
Barn m Old Norse, Medieval English
Old Norse byname derived from barn meaning "child".
Barni m Medieval English, Old Danish
Derived from Old Norse barn "child".
Barsabe f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Bathsheba.
Bartelot m Medieval English, English (Puritan)
Diminutive of Bartholomew. Precursor to the surname Bartlett.
Bartlet m Medieval English
Middle English diminutive of Bartholomew.
Basilia f Anglo-Norman, Medieval English, Spanish, Spanish (Latin American), German (Rare), Italian (Rare), Romani (Archaic)
Feminine form of Basil 1 via its latinized form Basilius. This was borne by an obscure early saint. As an English name it has long been obsolete, but was much used in the Middle Ages; perhaps a reference to Saint Veronica as Basilia in the medieval Mors Pilati (Death of Pilate) was responsible for the name's popularity.
Bat m English (Archaic), Medieval English
Diminutive of Bartholomew; also compare Bate. A notable bearer was American gunfighter and lawman Bartholomew 'Bat' Masterson (1853-1921), famed sheriff of Dodge City, Kansas.
Batcock m Medieval English
Middle English diminutive of Bartholomew, derived from a diminutive of Bate.
Batkin m Medieval English
Middle English diminutive of Bartholomew, from a combination of Bate and the diminutive suffix -kin.
Batsveinn m Medieval English
From the Old Norse byname Bátsveinn meaning "boatman".
Bay f & m Medieval English, English
From the Middle English personal name Baye, from Old English Beaga (masculine) or Beage (feminine).... [more]
Beard m Medieval English
Possible anglicization of Barth.
Begilda f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of Old English Béaghild.
Ber m Medieval English, Germanic
Possible diminutive of ber- names. Also the germanic word for "bear."
Berewold m Medieval English
From words beofor, meaning "beaver" and wold meaning "forest."
Bergulf m Medieval English
Variant of Bergulfr (see Borgulfr).
Bernwulf m Medieval English
Variant of Berowulf. Since the 11th century, his name has appeared as Bernwelf. It may also be spelled Berowolf or Bernulf.
Berowulf m Medieval English, Germanic
Variant of Bernwulf, from Germanic bero "bear" and wulf "wolf."
Besi m Medieval English (Latinized), Medieval Scandinavian (Latinized)
Variant of Bisi or Bósi. This is found in the 11th-century Domesday Book.
Betrice f Medieval English
Contracted form of Beatrice.
Biarni m Medieval English, Old Danish
Old Norse and Old Danish variant of Biǫrn as well as short form of names containing the element Björn.
Blacre m Medieval Scandinavian, Medieval English
Form of Old Norse Blakkr which occurs in Domesday Book.
Blæcsunu m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Derived from the Old English elements blæc "black" and sunu "son".
Blanc m Medieval English
A masculine equivalent of Blanche. Also compare Demiblanc and Blanchard, other names recorded in Domesday Book.
Blancard m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Blanchard.
Blaze f & m Medieval English
Name used in reference to St. Blaze.
Blitha f Medieval English
Derived from Old English blíðe "merry; friendly" (compare Blíða and Blida).
Boli m Medieval English
Medieval English form of Bolli.
Bolla m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Bolle.
Bosi m Medieval English, Old Danish
Old Danish form of Bósi.
Bóti m Medieval English, Old Norse
Originally a byname meaning "man from Bute" in parts of Scandinavia, it later became a diminutive of names containing the name element bot "remedy, help".