Medieval English Submitted Names

These names were used by medieval English peoples.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ERNSI m Medieval English
Medieval variant of Earnsige.
ERNWULF m Medieval English
Medieval variant of Earnwulf.
ERNWY m Medieval English
Medieval variant of Earnwig.
ESGER m Medieval English, Old Danish
Old Danish variant of Asger.
ESSOCHER m Medieval English
Of debated origin and meaning. Theories include a younger form of Æschere.
ESTGAR m Medieval English
Medieval variant of the Old English name Eastgar, which is composed of the elements east "grace" and gar "spear".
ESTMUND m Medieval English
Medieval variant of Eastmund.
ESTRILDIS f Medieval English (Latinized)
From Estrild, a medieval form of the Old English name Éastorhild that survived in England only until the 12th century (according to the 1984 'Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names')... [more]
ETHELWOLD m Medieval English
Middle English form of Æthelwold. This was the name of several Anglo-Saxon saints.
EUDO m Medieval English, Medieval French
Older form of Eudes. Some scholars also see a link to the Germanic elements euth- and eud-, which they connect to the Old Norse jodh "child".
EVETT f American (Rare), Jamaican Patois (Rare), Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Eve and precursor of modern Yvette. See also Evette.
EVOT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Eve.
EVOTT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Eve.
FARMAN m Medieval English, Old Danish, Old Swedish
Old Swedish and Old Danish form of Farmaðr.
FIGG m Medieval English
Diminutive of Fulke.
FIGGIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Fulke.
FILLYS f Medieval English
Of debated origin. Some academics consider this name a variant of Felis and Phelis, the medieval English form of Old French Felise, while others see Fillys as an early variant of Phyllis.
FIRMATUS m History, Medieval English (Latinized, ?), Late Roman (?), Old Norman (?)
Derived from Latin firmatus meaning "firmed, strengthened", itself a derivative of firmus "firm, strong, enduring, stable" (making it a cognate of Firminus; also compare Firmus). This was borne by Firmatus the deacon, an obscure early Christian martyr... [more]
FLORICE m Medieval English, Medieval French
Medieval English and French variant of Floris, from the name of a male character in the medieval romance Floris (or Florice) and Blancheflour, apparently derived from floris, Latin meaning "of flowers" or "belonging to flowers".
FLORICE f English, Medieval English
Medieval English feminine form of Late Latin Floritia, derived from Flora. Compare Clarice and Lettice.
FREDEGAEST m Medieval English
Possible variation of Fredegis.
FREEWILL m & f Medieval English
Meaning, "the power of acting without the constraint of necessity or fate; the ability to act at one's own discretion." Referring to the freewill provided to us by God.
FRETHESENTA f Anglo-Norman, Medieval English
Old French form of Frithesuind, the Germanic cognate of Friðuswiþ.
FULCWALD m Medieval English
Means "leader of folk" or "leader of people."
GALIAN m Medieval German, Medieval English
Medieval German and English form of Galianus / Galienus. As a German name, it was recorded in German-speaking Switzerland in the 1400s.
GALIENA f Medieval German, Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. One theory, however, tries to connect this name to Latin Gallus, Galla "inhabitant of Gallia".
GAMALBARN m Medieval Scandinavian, Medieval English
Hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian name meaning "young Gamall", from a combination of the Old Norse name Gamall and barn "child, young man". (Gamall was originally a byname taken from the Old Norse adjective gamall "old", which gives *Gamalbarn the seemingly self-contradictory meaning "old child".)... [more]
GAMALKARL m Medieval Scandinavian, Medieval English
Hypothetical Anglo-Scandinavian name meaning "old Karl", from Old Norse gamall "old" combined with Karl.
GELLEIA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Juliana (compare Gillian).
GENTA f Medieval Jewish, Medieval English
Short form of Gentil, Gentile, Gentilia and similar names as well as a feminine form of Gento. It was recorded in England between the 11th and 13th centuries.
GEST m Medieval English
Possibly derived from the germanic name element gest meaning "stranger" or "guest."
GIBBON m Medieval English, Manx (Archaic)
Medieval English diminutive of Gib, itself a short form of Gilbert.
GILLOT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Gillian or Julian. See also Juliet.
GISLA f Old Danish, Old Swedish, Medieval English
Old Danish and Old Swedish form of Gísla.
GISO m German (Rare), Medieval English, Medieval French
Short form of names starting in Gis- like Gisbert.
GOLDA m Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Both an Old English byname derived from gold "gold" and a short form of various compound names beginning with the Old English element gold, such as Goldstan or Goldwine. This name persisted into the Middle Ages.
GOLDING m Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Late Old English personal name meaning "son of Golda" or "son of Golde", derived from Golda (or the feminine form Golde) and the Old English patronymic suffix -ing.
GOLDIVA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Medieval English
Latinized form of *Goldgifu, an unrecorded Old English name meaning "gold gift" from the elements gold and giefu "gift".
GOLLA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old Norse Gulla.
GÖTAR m Old Swedish, Medieval English
Swedish modern form of Gautarr.
GOWAN m & f Scottish, Medieval English
From a Scots name for the daisy and other golden or white field flowers, perhaps ultimately from Old Norse gollinn "golden". Robert Burns' poem "To a Mountain Daisy" (1786) was originally titled "The Gowan"... [more]
GRECIA f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories, however, derive this name from Old French gris "gray", which was generally rendered as grece; greyce in Medieval English. Early on the name became popularly associated with Latin gratia (compare Grace).
GREEN m English, Medieval English
Transferred use of the surname Green.
GRESILDA f Medieval English
Late medieval English variant of Griselda.
GUIOT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Guy.
GUNILD f & m Medieval English, Old Danish, Norwegian
Danish variant of Gunhild and former Norwegian variant of GunnulfR.
GUNNOR f Medieval English, Medieval French
Anglo-Norman form of the Old Norse name Gunnvör (see Gunvor), documented in 1066 (the year of the Norman conquest). The name Gunnvör occurs frequently in Old Danish as Gunnur (or Latin Gunwara), also appearing in Old Swedish as Gunnur and Gunvor... [more]
GUNWOR f & m Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old Norse Gunnvǫr and variant of Gunnor.
HALKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Henry.
HALLET m Medieval English
Diminutive of Henry.
HAMELOT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hamon and Hamond.
HAMMETT m Medieval English
Possible relation to Hamon?
HAMONET m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hamon and Hamond.
HAN m & f Dutch, Medieval English
Short form of Johannes or Hanne (and similar names).
HARIPH m Biblical, English (Puritan), Medieval English
From the root harap with multiple meanings. The masculine noun חרף (horep), literally meaning a (fruit-)gathering; used only in the sense of harvest or harvest time (Genesis 8:22), and subsequently to denote the season of autumn or winter (the season which contains the Hebrew ninth month, which is our November to December — Jeremiah 36:22)... [more]
HAVELOK m Literature, Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old Norse Hafleikr, which literally means "sea sport" from Old Norse haf "sea, ocean" and leikr "play" (more specifically, a word with three distinct meanings: "beauty", "game", and "lay")... [more]
HAVERON m Medieval English
Medieval variant of Harvey.
HAWISE f Medieval English
From the Old French name Haueis, itself from a short form of Hadewidis, a Germanic name composed of the elements hadu "battle, combat" and wid "wide". The Normans introduced this name to England... [more]
HAWKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Henry.
HELEWISE f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Eloise.
HENNA f Medieval English
Feminization of Henn, a medieval diminutive of Henry.
HERESWITH f Medieval English (Rare, Archaic)
A dithematic name formed from the Germanic name elements HARI "army" and SWINTH "strong".
HEW m English, Medieval English
Diminutive of Matthew as well as a medieval diminutive of Hugh.
HEWET m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hugh. See also Huguette.
HICH m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Richard (compare Hicke). In England, this name was common in the 13th century, particularly in Cheshire.
HICK m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive form of Richard using rhyming slang. It has dropped out of use because of the word 'hick' being a derogatory slang term used to refer to an uneducated, unsophisticated person from the country.
HICKE m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Richard. The change in the initial consonant is said to have been caused by the way the velar Norman R was pronounced by the English (compare Dick).... [more]
HICKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Isaac.
HIGG m Medieval English
Diminutive of Isaac.
HIGGIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Isaac.
HIGGOT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Isaac.
HILDITH f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Hildgýð.
HITCH m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Richard.
HOBBY m Medieval English
Medieval English diminutive of Robin. This is where the English word hobby was derived.
HODGE m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Roger. The change in the initial consonant is said to have been caused by the way the velar Norman R was pronounced by the English.... [more]
HUGELIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hugh.
HUGGIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hugh.
HUGONET m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hugh.
HUGYN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Hugh.
HUMILITY f English (Puritan), Medieval English
Directly taken from the English word, ultimately from Latin humilitas "humbleness; meekness".
HUTCHIN m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Hugh.
HYSSOP f Medieval English (Rare)
Derived from Latin hyssopus "hyssop" (Middle English ysope). This rare name was not used outside of England.
IBBOT f Manx, Medieval English
Manx diminutive of Isabel.
IDEMAY f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English *Idmæg.
IMAGINATION m & f English (Puritan), Medieval English
Referring to the puritan fear of the imagination and its ability to have free reign beyond scripture.
IMEDIA f Medieval English
Of unknown origin and meaning.
INGIFRITH f Medieval English (Anglicized, Archaic)
Medieval English form of the Old Norse name Ingifríðr.
INGREDA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Ingrid.
INGRITH f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Ingríðr.
ISELOTA f Medieval English
Most likely a diminutive of Isolda (compare Iseldis).
ISEMAY f Medieval English
Perhaps from a hypothetic Germanic name like *Ismegi or *Ismagi, *Ismagin, which would mean "iron strength" from isan, itself from îsarn "iron" (see Isanbrand; however, the first element could also be îs "ice") combined with magan "strength, might"... [more]
ISMARY f Spanish (Latin American, Rare), American (Hispanic, Rare), Medieval English, English (Archaic)
Spanish variant of Ismaria as well as a Medieval English vernacular form and Early Modern English variant of Ismeria.
ISMERIA f Medieval English, Medieval German, Spanish
Quasi-Marian name connected to the devotion of Notre Dame de Liesse in Picardy. According to the legend, Ismeria ("the Black Madonna") was a Moorish girl who converted to Christianity and released the crusaders captivated by her father because of the apparitions of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
ISOTA f Medieval English
Diminutive of Isolde.
ISOTT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Isolde.
JACKETT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Jack.
JACON m English (Modern, Rare), Medieval English
Rare variant of Jason. In medieval English this is a variation of Jenkin.
JAKEMINA f Medieval English
Medieval English borrowing of Jacquemine.
JAKETTA f Medieval English
Medieval English borrowing of Jacquette.
JANNETIN m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Jannet.
JANNITING m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Jannet.
JENEPHIE f Medieval English
Etymology uncertain, although it may be a corrupted form of Jennifer or Genevieve.
JENKIN m & f English (Puritan), Medieval English
Diminutive of John as well as a diminutive of Sybil.
JENNET f English (Archaic), Medieval English, Medieval Scottish, Scottish (Archaic)
Variant of Janet found in medieval documents from England, Scotland and Ireland.
JOCEA f Medieval English
Feminine form of Joceus, the Latinized form of medieval French Josse.