Old Norman Submitted Names

Old Norman names were used by the Normans in northwestern France.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AILIONÓRA f Irish (Rare), Medieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Irish form of ELEANOR (probably via Latin Alienora). This name occurs in medieval Irish annals, belonging to two Anglo-Norman noblewomen living in Ireland... [more]
AIRARD m Medieval French, Anglo-Norman
Derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and hard "brave, hardy". (Compare ERHARD.)
AITARD m Anglo-Norman, Medieval French
The first element of this name may be Old High German eit meaning "fire; brilliant". The second element is Old Saxon hard "strong, hard" (Old High German hart).
ALSON f Medieval Irish (Anglicized), Anglo-Norman
Anglicized form of ALLSÚN, recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ANSTACE f Medieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Variant of ANSTICE recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ASCELINA f Medieval French, Anglo-Norman
Feminine form of ASCELIN. This was the name of a 12th-century French saint, a Cistercian mystic.
BERNER m Medieval English, Old Norman
From the Old Norman personal names BERNIER or BRENIER, a derivative of bren, bran "bran", on which the dogs were fed.
BRADNEY m Old Norman
Bradney is one of the many names that the Normans brought with them when they conquered England in 1066. The Bradney family lived in the town and parish of Bradney in county Somerset. The name was originally derived from the Old English word "bradeney," which means "the dweller at the broad island."
ELLENOR f English, Medieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Variant of ELEANOR. This name was, among others, recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ELLICE f English, Anglo-Norman, Medieval Irish (Anglicized), Medieval English
Anglicized form of EILÍSE and EILÍS. This name was recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families... [more]
EVELIN f Medieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Early Anglicization of AIBHILÍN. This name was recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
FILIMOR m Anglo-Norman
Derived from the Germanic elements filu "much, very" and meri "famous".
FIRMATUS m History, Medieval English (Latinized, ?), Late Roman (?), Old Norman (?)
Derived from Latin firmatus meaning "firmed, strengthened", itself a derivative of firmus "firm, strong, enduring, stable" (making it a cognate of FIRMINUS; also compare Firmus)... [more]
FRETHESENTA f Anglo-Norman, Medieval English
Old French form of Frithesuind, the Germanic cognate of FRIÐUSWIÞ.
GALFRID m Anglo-Norman, Manx (Archaic)
Anglo-Norman variant of GEOFFREY which was also used on the Isle of Man.
GILLIE f Anglo-Norman, Medieval Irish
Feminine form of GILES and GILLES (and thus a cognate of EGIDIA) which was recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ISMAY f English (British), Dutch, Anglo-Norman, Medieval Irish
Variant of ISEMAY, an Anglo-Norman name of uncertain origin and meaning. It was also recorded in medieval Ireland on women born into Anglo-Norman families.
MAUGER m Medieval French, Anglo-Norman
Norman French form of MADALGAR.
OTTIWELL m Anglo-Norman, English (British, Rare)
From Otuel, which was a diminutive of the Norman names Otoïs, meaning literally "wealth-wide" or "wealth-wood" (from the Germanic elements aud "wealth, fortune" and wid "wide" or witu "wood"), and Otewi, meaning literally "wealth-war" (in which the second element is wig "war")... [more]
PAGAN m Anglo-Norman, Medieval English
From Latin paganus meaning "rustic, rural" and later "heathen", which was often given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults whose religious zeal was lacking. An Anglo-Norman bearer was Sir Pain or Pagan fitzJohn (died 1137), one of the English king Henry I's "new men"... [more]
PRIMEVEIRE f Anglo-Norman (Archaic)
Means "primrose"in French. and It was commonly used in the Middle Ages although now it is practically obsolete.
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