Anglo-Norman Submitted Names

Anglo-Norman names were used by medieval Anglo-Normans in England.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AILIONÓRAfIrish (Rare), Medieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Irish form of Eleanor (probably via Latin Alienora). This name occurs in medieval Irish annals, belonging to two Anglo-Norman noblewomen living in Ireland. It may or may not have been adopted by Gaels.
ALSONfMedieval Irish (Anglicized), Anglo-Norman
Anglicized form of Allsún, recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ANSTACEfMedieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Variant of Anstice recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ASCELINAfMedieval French, Anglo-Norman
Feminine form of Ascelin. This was the name of a 12th-century French saint, a Cistercian mystic.
ELLICEfEnglish, Anglo-Norman, Medieval Irish (Anglicized), Medieval English
Anglicized form of Eilíse and Eilís. This name was recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families. It is still used in the modern English-speaking world.
EVELINfMedieval Irish, Anglo-Norman
Early Anglicization of Aibhilín. This name was recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
FILIMORmAnglo-Norman
Derived from the Germanic elements filu "much, very" and meri "famous".
FRETHESENTAfAnglo-Norman, Medieval English
Old French form of Frithesuind, the Germanic cognate of Friðuswiþ.
GILLIEfAnglo-Norman, Medieval Irish
Feminine form of Giles and Gilles (and thus a cognate of Egidia) which was recorded in late medieval Ireland on women born into English and Anglo-Norman families.
ISMAYfEnglish (British), Dutch, Anglo-Norman, Medieval Irish
Variant of Isemay, an Anglo-Norman name of uncertain origin and meaning. It was also recorded in medieval Ireland on women born into Anglo-Norman families.
OTTIWELLmAnglo-Norman, English (British, Rare)
From Otuel, which was a diminutive of the Norman names Otoïs, meaning literally "wealth-wide" or "wealth-wood" (from the Germanic elements aud "wealth, fortune" and wid "wide" or witu "wood"), and Otewi, meaning literally "wealth-war" (in which the second element is wig "war")... [more]
PAGANmAnglo-Norman, Medieval English
From Latin paganus meaning "rustic, rural" and later "heathen", which was often given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults whose religious zeal was lacking. An Anglo-Norman bearer was Sir Pain or Pagan fitzJohn (died 1137), one of the English king Henry I's "new men"... [more]
PRIMEVEIREfAnglo-Norman (Archaic)
Means "primrose"in French. and It was commonly used in the Middle Ages although now it is practically obsolete.