Medieval English Submitted Names

These names were used by medieval English peoples.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
JOLDWIN m Medieval English
Found on the Henry III Fine Rolls.
JUDKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Judd, itself a diminutive of Jordan.
JUDSON m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Jordan.
KATERINE f Medieval English, Medieval Welsh, Swedish (Rare), Norwegian (Rare)
Variant of Katerina as well as a Scandinavian spelling of French Catherine.
KID m Medieval English
Medieval variant of Kit.
KYNEBURGA f Medieval English
Variant of Cyneburga. This was the name of Saint Kyneburga, one of the four daughters of King Paeda.
KYNSEY m Medieval English
Medieval form of Cynesige.
LANGIVA f Medieval English
Latinized form of an uncertain name, probably either Old English *Langgifu, composed of the elements lang "long, tall, lasting" and giefu "gift", or Old Norse Langlíf, originally a byname meaning "long life" (also Latinized as Langliva).
LAYAMON m History, Medieval English
Medieval form of the Old Norse Lǫgmaðr meaning "lawyer", derived from lǫg "law" and maðr "man". This was the name of an early 13th-century English poet and chronicler known for authoring 'Brut', the first English-language work to feature King Arthur.
LECELINA f Medieval English
Latinate double diminutive of Lece, an Old French derivative of Laetitia.
LEFMAN m Medieval English
Medieval form of Leofman.
LEOFEVA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Leofgifu.
LEOFHERE m Medieval English
Composed of the elements leof ‘dear’, ‘beloved’ + here ‘army’.
LEOFRED m Norwegian (Rare), Medieval English
Norwegian combination of leo "lion" and friðr "love, peace".
LEOFWARU f Medieval English
This name combines the Old English elements leof meaning "dear, valued, beloved" and waru meaning "shelter, protection, care."
LEOLINE m & f Medieval English, English (Rare)
Medieval Anglicization of Llywelyn which has been documented from the 13th century onwards. (Cf. Leolin.) It was borne by Welsh politician Sir Leoline Jenkins (1625-1685). In Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem 'Christabel' (1797-1801) this name belongs to Christabel's father, Sir Leoline, Baron of Langdale Hall.... [more]
LEOVENATH m Medieval English
Variant spelling of the Anglo-Saxon name Leofnoth. Leovenath was the father of the early English poet and chronicler Layamon.
LEVA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Léofe.
LEVITH f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Léofgýð.
LEWENA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Léofwynn.
LIA f Medieval English (Rare)
Of unknown origin and meaning.
LICORICIA f Medieval Jewish, Jewish (Archaic), Medieval English
This name was recorded in the Jewish community in medieval England. It was famously borne by Licoricia of Winchester who was one of the most prominent female bankers and one of the most notable English Jewish women of her time.... [more]
LINDGEOFU f Medieval English
Composed of the elements lind ‘lime (wood)’, i.e. ‘shield’ (a transferred sense) + gifu, geofu ‘gift’.
LINDGIFU f Medieval English
Composed of the elements lind ‘lime (wood)’, i.e. ‘shield’ (a transferred sense) + gifu, geofu ‘gift’.
LINOT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Elena.
LIVITH f Medieval English
A later form of the Old English name Leofgyth.
LOUDEY f Medieval English, Cornish
Medieval form of Leofdæg. Although in most of England it died out after the Middle Ages, this name survived in Cornwall, especially in the form Lowdie.
LOVE m Medieval English
Short form of Lovell.
LUCCOCK m Medieval English
Diminutive of Luke.
LYLIE f English, Medieval English
Lylie was first recorded as a diminutive of Elizabeth in 13th century England.... [more]
MABILIA f Medieval French, Medieval English, Gascon
Latinized form of Mabile, recorded in 15th-century French-speaking Switzerland.
MABOTT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Mabel.
MACE m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Thomas.
MÆRWYNN f Medieval English
Derived from the Old English mær meaning "famous" or Norse mær meaning "maid" the Old English wynn meaning "joy, bliss".
MAKINSON m Medieval English
Diminutive of Matthew. See also Makin.
MALINA f Medieval English
Diminutive of Mary (compare Malle).
MALKIN f Medieval English
Diminutive of Mary. This name is featured in Shakespeare's Corialanus Act ii Scene I.
MALKYN f Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Mault (see Maud) or Malle.
MARGET f Estonian (Rare), Manx (Archaic), American (Archaic), Old Swedish, Medieval English
Estonian variant of Margit, Old Swedish variant of Marghit and Manx dialect form of Margaid.
MARIOTIN f Medieval English
Double diminutive of Mary, compare Mariot.
MAT f Medieval English
Diminutive of Mathew and Mathea.
MATHEW f Medieval English (Rare)
Variant of Mathea, seen rarely in use. Typically given to girls born on St. Matthews Day (H21 September in the West and 16 November in the East).
MAUDELEN f Medieval English
Middle English name used during the early 14th century, it is derived from the Old French name Madelaine.... [more]
MAUDLIN f Medieval English, English (Rare)
Medieval English vernacular form of Magdalene via the French Madeleine.... [more]
MAYKINA f Medieval English
Feminization of Maykinus, itself a diminutive of Matthew. Essentially a female diminutive of Matthew.
MAYSANT f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Mathasuent, Mathasuenta or *Magisind and Megisend.
MELIOR f Medieval English (Rare)
Older form of Meliora, thought to come from Latin melior "better". Melior occurs as both family name and given name in Christian inscriptions of the Roman Empire. A Saint Meliorius gave his name to a church in Cornwall, which may account for the tradition that Meliora is an exclusively Cornish name... [more]
MEMORANTIA f Medieval English, Medieval Dutch
Memorantia f. Latin memorantia 'remembering'.
MERILDA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of *Mærhild.
MERWENN f English (Rare, Archaic), Medieval English
From the Old English name Mærwynn which was derived from mær meaning "famous" and wynn "joy". This was the name of a 10th-century saint, the first abbess of Rumsey convent in Hampshire, England after its 967 restoration under King Edward the Peaceful, and the spiritual teacher of Saint Elfleda.
MILDA f Medieval English
Short form of names beginning with the element Mild-.
MILDOINA f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories include a medieval English form of Old English *Mildwynn.
MILEON m Medieval Jewish, Medieval English
Most likely a variant of Milon. It was occasionally used by medieval English Jews as a translation of Meir.
MILLISAINTE f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Millicent.
MIRIELDA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Muriel.
MOLL m Medieval English
Medieval English diminutive of Oliver.
MOLT f Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Matilda.
MYKAL m Medieval English
Medieval English form of Michael (apparently).
NAB m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Abel. It used to be a medieval custom to drop syllables before a first name therefore “mine Abel” led to “Nab”.
NIB m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Isabel or John.
ODELINA f Medieval English
Feminine double diminutive of Odo.
ODIL f Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Odile.
ORIGINAL m Medieval English
Variant of Origenes used in the 17th century.
ORIOLDA f Medieval English
Allegedly a Latinized variant of Oriel via the variant Oriold.
ORM m Medieval English, Old Danish, Old Swedish, Norwegian (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Norse Mythology
Medieval English, Old Danish, Old Swedish and modern Scandinavian form of the Old Norse name Ormr, which itself was derived from Old Norse ormr "snake, serpent".... [more]
OSEKIN m Medieval English
Pet form of the various personal names with an Old English first element os "god".
OSEVA f Medieval English
Younger form of Osgifu.
OSITHA f Medieval English
Medieval English Latinized form of Old English Ósgýð (compare Osyth).
OSYTH f Medieval English
Medieval form of the Old English name Ósgýð, derived from the elements ós "god" and gyð "war" (perhaps meaning "divine war"). Saint Osyth was a martyr of the 7th century, an Anglian princess who founded a monastery at the village Chich in Essex, which was renamed St Osyth... [more]
PAGAN m Anglo-Norman, Medieval English
From Latin paganus meaning "rustic, rural" and later "heathen", which was often given to children whose baptism had been postponed or adults whose religious zeal was lacking. An Anglo-Norman bearer was Sir Pain or Pagan fitzJohn (died 1137), one of the English king Henry I's "new men"... [more]
PALCOCK m Medieval English
Diminutive of Paul.
PARKIN m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Peter. The change from er to ar is a characteristic phonetic development in Old French and Middle English.
PASCHA f Medieval English
Feminization of Pascal.
PASH m & f Medieval English
An old baptismal name given for children born on Easter in reference to the latin pascal. See also Paschal.
PASHKIN m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Pash.
PASK m Medieval English
Diminutive of Pascal.
PASKIN m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Pask.
PASKY m Medieval English
Diminutive of Pascal.
PAVIA f English (Rare), Medieval English
Medieval English name of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories include a derivation from Old French pavie "peach" and a derivation from Old French Pavie "woman from Pavia", a historic city in Italy... [more]
PAYNOT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Payn.
PERKIN m English, Medieval English
Transferred use of the surname Perkins, a corruption of Pierre introduced into England by the Norman Conquest. This name was born by Perkin Warbeck, a pretender to the English throne, who lived from c. 1474-1499.... [more]
PERSEVERANCE f Medieval English
Meaning, "steadfastness in doing something despite difficulty or delay in achieving success." Referring to persevering through the trials and tribulations that may come as a believer of Christ.
PHILLIP m & f Medieval English
Used frequently on girls as well as boys in various references of the time period.
PHILPOT m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Philip and Phillipa.
PIDCOCK m Medieval English
Diminutive of Peter. See also Peacock.
PITY m & f Medieval English
Meaning, "the feeling of sorrow and compassion caused by the suffering and misfortunes of others."
POSTHUMA f Medieval English (?), English (Archaic)
Feminization of Posthumus. (Cf. Postuma.) This was used as a second or third name to indicate the child's father had died before her birth, e.g. Gulielma Maria Posthuma Springett (1644-1694), the wife of William Penn, founder of Pennsylvania.
POSTHUMUS m Medieval English
Used as a second or third name to indicate the child of a deceased parent. ex. Thomas Posthumus son of Thomas. ... [more]
PRECIOSA f Medieval English, Judeo-Catalan (Archaic), Judeo-Spanish
Derived from the Old French precios (itself from the Latin pretiōsa) "precious, of great value". It was recorded three times in medieval England, in 1203 and 1279 as Preciosa, and in 1327 as Precious (which was probably the vernacular form).... [more]
PROXIMA f Medieval English (Rare)
From Latin proximus "nearest; closest."
PUCELLA f Medieval Jewish, Medieval English
Derived from Old French pulcella, pucelle "maid, young woman". It was recorded in England between the 11th and 13th centuries.
PYMME f Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Euphemia, which was popular in England in the Middle Ages.
QUENA f Medieval English, English (Modern, Rare)
Derived from Old English cwén "woman", this name was originally a diminutive of names containing said element.... [more]
QUENEVA f Medieval English
Middle English form of Cwengifu.
QUENILDA f Medieval English
Medieval form of Cwénhild, documented in 1332.
QUENIVA f Medieval English
Derived from Old English cwen "woman, wife; queen" and gifu "gift", this is the medieval English form of Cwéngifu.
RAMETTA f Medieval English
Medieval English borrowing of Old French Ramette.
RAND m Medieval English
Medieval short form of Randolf and other names beginning with the Germanic element rand meaning "rim (of a shield)". It was used for the central character in Robert Jordan's 'Wheel of Time' series.
RATIKIN m Medieval English
Possibly derived from the surname Ratikin.
RAVENILDA f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of Rauenilde or Ravenild, the medieval English forms of Hrafnhildr.
RAYNE f English (Modern), Medieval English
A variant of Rain, or from a surname which was a variant of the surname Raine. This coincides with a medieval English feminine name derived from Old French reine "queen", Latin regina (see Reine, Regina).
REDIGON f Medieval English, Medieval Cornish, Cornish (Archaic)
A medieval English vernacular form of Radegund, the name of a 6th-century Frankish queen and saint. In England, a number of churches were dedicated to Saint Radegund in the medieval period.
REGNILD f Medieval English
Possibly related to Ragnhild.
RELICTUS m Medieval English (Latinized)
Referring to relinquishing. This was found used on various "found" children presumed orphans.
RENOVATA f Medieval English
Name given frequently during the reformation in reference to the renovation of the church.
REYNA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Regina influenced by Old French reine "queen".
RHADEGUND f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Radegonde.
RICHEMAY f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Rícmæg.
RICHENZA f Polish, Medieval English, American (Rare), Medieval German
Polish and medieval English and medieval German form of Rikissa.
RIKILDA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Richild.
ROSFRITH f Medieval English
Apparently derived from the Old English elements hroð "glory, fame" (or possibly Germanic hros "horse", as found in Rosalind) and frið "peace, happiness". It was mentioned by the 12th-century English historian Reginald of Durham as belonging to a 7th-century Christian woman who, with Seigiv, had worshipped at the lost chapel of Saint Cuthbert in the Slitrig valley... [more]
SABELINA f Medieval English
Diminutive of Sabina used in the medieval period. It also coincides with a medieval Latin word meaning "sable", derived from Latin sabellum.
SAIEVA f Medieval English
Medieval form of Sægiefu.
SAMULINA f Medieval Jewish, Medieval English, Faroese
Feminine form of Samuel and Faroese form of Samuline.
SAXLEVE f Medieval English
Derived from Old English seax "dagger" and leofu "love".
SAYEVA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Sægiefu.
SCOLACE f Medieval English
English vernacular form of Scholastica. In England it was used as a Christian name from the late 12th century until the Protestant Reformation.
SEDANIA f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of Sedany, itself a variant of Sidony.
SEDEMAI f Medieval English
Variant of Sedemaiden, the medieval English form of Old English *Sidumægden or *Seodumægden.
SEELY m & f Medieval English
Medieval nickname for a person with a cheerful disposition, from Middle English seely "happy, fortunate" (from Old English sæl "happiness, good fortune"). The word was also occasionally used as a female personal name during the Middle Ages... [more]
SEGAR m Medieval English
Old English S?gar, composed of the elements s? ‘sea’ + gar ‘spear’.
SEIGIV f Medieval English
Medieval form of Sægiefu. It was mentioned by the 12th-century historian Reginald of Durham as belonging to a 7th-century Christian woman from Hawick who, with Rosfrith, had worshipped at the lost chapel of St Cuthbert in the Slitrig valley.
SEIGNURET m Medieval Jewish, Medieval English
Diminutive of one of the variants of Schneur.
SELIOMA f Medieval English
Etymology uncertain, although it is likely a form of Salome. It is attested in 16th Century England.
SELY f Medieval English
Derived from Old English sælig "happy, blessed".
SENSE m & f Medieval English
Medieval transliteration of Senchia or Sancho.
SEPHARE f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Zipporah.
SIBLEY f Medieval English
Medieval vernacular form of Sibyl.
SIGRITH f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Sigríðr.
SILKIN f Medieval English
Diminutive of Sybil.
SIM m English (American), Medieval English
Modern English short form of Simon and medieval English diminutive of Theobald.
SINOTH m Medieval English
Medieval English form of Sigenoth.
SIREDA f Medieval English
Of debated origin and meaning. Current theories include a variant of Sigreda and a feminine form of Sired, the medieval English form of Old English Sigeræd.
SITHA f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. It might be a borrowing of Síða or a truncated form of Ositha.
SITHNEY m Medieval English
English adoption of Sezni.
SPLENDORA f Medieval English, Italian
Medieval English name (found in a Curia Regis Roll item dated 1213), derived from Latin splendor meaning "brilliance, brightness, lustre, distinction". (It was listed in 'A Dictionary of English Surnames' by Dr Reaney, who noted: "In the Middle Ages there was a fashion for fanciful feminine names, few of which have survived, or given rise to surnames.") This is also the name a small town in the U.S. state of Texas.
SPRAGGE m Medieval English
Meaning "lively."
SQUIRE m Medieval English, English
From Middle English esquire, from Old French escuier, from Latin scūtārius (“shield-bearer”), from scūtum (“shield”). Also a surname (Squire).
SWEETING f Medieval English
From Old English swet "sweet".
SWEETLOVE f Medieval English
From old English swet "sweet" and lufu "love".
TACE f Medieval English (Latinized)
Diminutive of Silence, being Latin for "to be silent." See also Tacey.
TEDRICK m Medieval English
Original medieval form of Dedrick.
THEDA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Þéode.
THEDILDA f Medieval English
Medieval English contracted form of Theodechilda.
THÉODRED m Literature, Medieval English
From the Anglo-Saxon words þeod ("people") and ræd ("counsel"). This name was used by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Théodred is the deceased son of the king of Rohan.... [more]
THOMASSE f Medieval English, Medieval French, French (Archaic)
Feminine form of Thomas. One French bearer was Thomasse Bernard Debussy (d. 1671), an ancestress of composer Claude Debussy (1862-1918).
THORILD f Medieval English, Scandinavian (Rare)
Medieval English and modern Scandinavian form of the Old Norse name Þórhildr.
THORLOGH f Medieval English
Presumably a Medieval English form of the Old Norse and modern Icelandic name þórlaug. Alternatively, it might be an anglicisation of Thorløgh, which itself is the Old Swedish form of þórlaug.
THURSDAY f & m English (Rare), African American, Medieval English
From the day of the week, derived from Old Dutch Thūrsdagr, which literally means Thor's Day.... [more]
THURSTON m English, Medieval English
From the Old Norse name Þórsteinn, meaning "Thor's stone".
TIB f & m Medieval English
Short form of Theobalda/Theobald and Tabitha. (See also Tibbot).
TIBBOT m & f Medieval English
Diminutive of Theobald and Theobalda.
TIBOTA f Medieval English
Feminine diminutive of Theobald.
TIFFAN f Medieval English
Variant Medieval English form of Theophania.
TILLA f Dutch, German, Romansh, Medieval English
Medieval English, Dutch and German short form of Mechtilda or Mathilda as well as a German short form of Ottilie and Ottilia and a Romansh short form of Matilda, Ottilia, Domitilla, Bertilla and Cecilia.... [more]
TILLE f German (East Prussian), Medieval English
East Prussian German form of Tilla as well as a medieval English variant of Tilla.
TOLLETT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Toll.
TOMKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Walter and Thomas.
TYPHENETE f Medieval English
Variant Medieval English form of Theophania.
WACA m Medieval English
Byname meaning, "watchful."
WALERAN m Medieval English
Possibly a variation of Valerian. There are many famous bearers of this name.
WALKELIN m Medieval English
There are a number of famous bearers of this name.
WANTLIANA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Gwenllian.
WARINA f Medieval English
Feminine form of Warin.