Japanese Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of the Japanese people.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AMANOZAKO f Japanese Mythology
The furious and monsterous goddess born from Susanoo's pent up rage. Her name means "heaven opposing everything".
AME-NO-UZUME f Japanese Mythology
Japanese goddess of dawn, mirth and revelry. Her name is derived from 天 (ame) meaning "sky, heavens", 宇 (u) meaning "roof, eaves, house" or "the whole world", 受 (zu) meaning "accept" and 売 (me) meaning "sell", or meaning "ornamental hairpen" and 女 (me) meaning "woman".
AMIDA m Japanese Mythology
The god to whom the Japanese turned at the moment of death.
APASAM-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of the threshold, often summoned for protection during changes of state.
BAKU m Japanese (Rare), Japanese Mythology
The "Eater of Nightmares (a lion-headed ghost)" in Japanese Mythology. If you call for him, he will eat away your nightmares. It can also refer to a "Tapir", for its appearance. I've heard that in the Japanese language, Baku means "Command Esteem", "Receive or Gain", or "Win Acclaim".
BENZAITEN f Japanese Mythology
The name of a Japanese goddess, often considered to be the Japanese form of Saraswati. Her name is derived from 弁 (ben) meaning "dialect, discrimination, petal", 才 (zai) meaning "ability, talent" or 財 (zai) meaning "property, riches, wealth" and 天 (ten) meaning "the sky, heavens".
CIKAP-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of land and owls, often depicted as (to nobody's surprise) a great owl.
DAIKOKUTENNYO f Japanese Mythology
The Japanese form of the goddess Mahakali or a feminine form of Daikokuten, the god of great blackness or darkness. Her name means "She of the Great Blackness of the Heavens".
ENENRA m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 煙 (en) meaning "smokey", 々, a ideographic iteration mark, indicating that the previous kanji should be repeated combined with 羅 (ra) meaning "lightweight fabric" or sometimes spelt as "enraenra" which is built from Japanese 煙 (en) meaning "smokey", 羅 (ra) meaning "lightweight fabric", 煙 (en) meaning "smokey" combined with 羅 (ra) meaning "lightweight fabric".... [more]
FUDO m Japanese (Rare), Japanese Mythology
This is the god of fire and wisdom in Japanese mythology, and it has also become a rare name for males.
FŪJIN m Japanese, Japanese Mythology
This name is used as 風人 with 風 (fu, fuu, kaza-, kaze, -kaze) meaning "air, manner, style, wind" and 人 (jin, nin, -to, hito, -ri) meaning "person."... [more]
HARITI f Japanese Mythology
Hārītī (Sanskrit), also known as Kishimojin (鬼子母神?), is a Buddhist goddess for the protection of children, easy delivery, happy child rearing and parenting, harmony between husband and wife, love, and the well-being and safety of the family.
HIKOBOSHI m Japanese, Astronomy, Japanese Mythology
This is the name of the star Altair in Japan. It literally means "Boy, Male Star". He's a mythological figure where he and his wife, Orihime (the Vega star), meet once every year on the 7th day of the 7th month... [more]
HIMIKO f Japanese Mythology
Meaning "sun daughter" or "sun child" or possibly "princess" in archaic Japanese. This is from Old Japanese hime (姫) meaning 'young noblewoman, princess', or from hi (日) 'sun' and me (女) 'woman' or miko (覡 or 巫女) 'shamaness, shrine maiden, priestess'... [more]
INARI f & m Japanese, Japanese Mythology
Means "carrying rice" or "rice load" in Japanese.... [more]
JIRAIYA m & f Japanese Mythology, Popular Culture, English (Modern, Rare)
This name is written as either 自来也 or 児雷也, belonging to the main character (who uses shape-shifting magic to morph into a gigantic toad) of the folklore Jiraiya Gōketsu Monogatari (児雷也豪傑譚), published as a series from 1839 to 1868, though first recorded in Jiraiya Monogatari (自来也説話) back in 1806, which used the original form 自来也.... [more]
KAKUYAMA-NO-UNEO-NO-KONOSHITA-NI-ZASU-KAMI f Japanese Mythology
An epithet of the spring water goddess Nakisawame. It is derived from 香 (kaku) meaning "pleasant scent, fragrance", 山 (yama) meaning "mountain", の (no) meaning "of", 畝 (une) meaning "raised earth in a field" or "rib", 尾 (o) meaning "tail", "foot of a mountain" or "the end of something", の (no) meaning "of", 木 (ki) meaning "tree, wood", の (no) meaning "of", 下 (shita) meaning "the below", 坐 (za) meaning "to sit, to bear fruit" and 神 (kami) meaning "god, deity, spirit".
KAMUY m & f Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Refers to a spiritual or divine entity in the mythology of the indigenous Ainu people of Japan. The term shares similarities with the Japanese word "kami" (神) in both phonology and meaning.
KANDAKORO-KAMUY m Ainu, Japanese Mythology, Far Eastern Mythology
God of the sky and prime originator in Ainu mythology.
KAZURAKINOTAKANUKAHIME f Japanese Mythology
In Japanese mythology, this is the name of the mother of Empress Jingū and the descendant of Amenohiboko. Her name is derived from 葛 (kazura) meaning "creeping plant", 城 (ki) meaning "castle, fort", 高 (taka) meaning "high, higher, maximum", 顙 (nuka) meaning "forehead, to bow" and 媛 (hime) meaning "princess".
KENAS-UNARPE f Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Blood-sucking monster in Ainu mythology who primarily preys upon hunters.
KIM-UN-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of bears and mountains. Bears are a common feature in Ainu mythology and are often depicted as benevolent creatures.
KINA-SUT-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of snakes, depicted as the brother of Nusa-kor-kamuy (occasionally, they are even regarded as the same entity).
KINTARO m Japanese Mythology
Variant transcription of Kintarō.
KISHIMOJIN f Japanese Mythology
The name of a Japanese protector goddess of children and child rearing who is sometimes also seen as a vicious demon of misery and unhappiness towards children and parents. Her name is derived from 鬼 (ki) meaning "ghost, evil spirit, demon", 子 (shi) meaning "child", 母 (mo) meaning "mother" and 神 (jin) meaning "god, deity, spirit".
KONOHANASAKUYA f Japanese Mythology
Konohanasakuya-hime is represents how delicate earthly life is in Japanese mythology and she is symbolized by the cherry blossom.
KOTAN-KAR-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu creator deity, responsible for the creation of the human world, the six gods (Kamuy), and six underworlds.
KUDAN f & m Japanese, Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 件 (kudan) meaning "matter", or more creatively translated as "human-faced bovine", is a yōkai which became widely known throughout Japan during the first half of the 19th century. The kanji used for Kudan can also come from Japanese 人 (hito) meaning "person" combined with 牛 (ushi) meaning "cow, bull"... [more]
KUSANAGI m Japanese Mythology
(草薙剣) Full name is(phoneticly) is Kusanagi-No-tsurugi. The name originated from a legendary sword from the three Imperial Regalia of Japan. As well as Sessho-seki and Tonbogiri.... [more]
MARICI f Japanese Mythology, Chinese Mythology
Marici is a deva or bodhisattva associated with light and the sun. She is known as Molizhitian (摩利支天) or Molizhitian Pusa (摩利支天菩萨) in China and Marishi-ten (摩利支天?) in Japan and in Tibetan as 'Odzer Canma, "Woman Endowed with Rays of Light" (Wylie: 'od zer can ma)... [more]
MOSIRKARA-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) responsible for creating the Earth at the behest of (Kandakoro Kamuy).
NAKISAWAME f Japanese Mythology
The name of the Japanese goddess of spring water. Her name is derived from 泣 (naki) meaning "to weep", 啼 (naki) meaning "to wail, cry" or 哭 (naki) meaning "to cry, wail", 沢 (sawa) meaning "mountain stream, swamp, marsh" and 女 (me) meaning "woman".
NURIBOTOKE m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 塗 (nuri) meaning "paint" combined with 仏 (botoke) meaning "Buddha". ... [more]
NUSA-KOR-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of the dead who occasionally serves as a messenger to the other Kamuy.
OKINAGATARASHI f Japanese Mythology
In Japanese mythology, this was Empress Jingu's name before she took the throne. Her name is derived from the honorific o, meaning "breath", meaning "long, long time, everlasting, increasing", , refering to the obi on a kimono, or "belt, band", meaning "equal, match, comparison" and meaning "to sell".
OROCHI f Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 大蛇 meaning "big snake". In Mythology, this was the name of a serpent that demanded virgin sacrifices.
OTOHIME f Japanese Mythology
Means "luminous jewel" or "youngest princess". She was a goddess is Japanese mythology, also known as Toyotama-Hime.... [more]
PAUCHI-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of insanity, said to plague humanity with stomach aches, seizures, and uncontrollable dancing.
REPUN-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of the sea, depicted as either an orca or a harpoon-wielding young man.
SAKUYA m & f Japanese, Japanese Mythology
As a unisex name, it can be used as 咲也, 咲哉, 咲弥, 朔夜 or 朔椰 with 咲 (shou, sa.ku, -zaki) meaning "bloom, blossom", 朔 (saku, tsuitachi) meaning "conjuction (astronomy), first day of the month", 也 (e, ya, ka, nari, mata) meaning "to be (archaic form)", 哉 (sai, kana, ya) meaning "alas, how, question mark, what", 弥 (bi, mi, amaneshi, iya, iyoiyo, tooi, hisashi, hisa.shii, ya, wata.ru) meaning "all the more, increasingly", 夜 (ya, yo, yoru) meaning "evening, night" and 椰 (ya, yashi) meaning "coconut tree."... [more]
SEIŌBO f Japanese Mythology
The Japanese name of the Queen Mother of the West, or Xiwangmu.
SHIRAMBA-KAMUY m Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu god (Kamuy) of vegetation. He is depicted as the brother of Hasinaw-uk-kamuy, the goddess of the hunt.
SUIJIN m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese 水 (sui) meaning "water" and 神 (jin) meaning "god, spirit". This is the name of the god of water in Japanese mythology.
SUSANOO m Japanese Mythology
The Shinto god of sea and storms, brother of Amaterasu and Tsukuyomi.
TAIYOO f Japanese Mythology
The name of a legendary queen regnant of Yamatai, successor of queen Himiko. Her name is derived from 臺 (tai) meaning "tower, lookout, platform" and 與 (yo) meaning "to give, award, provide".
TAKERU m Japanese, Japanese Mythology
This name can be used as 猛 (mou, takeru) meaning "fierce, rave, rush, become furious, wildness, strength" or it can be used to combine 武 (bu, mu, take.shi) meaning "arms, chivalry, military, warrior", 丈 (jou, take, dake) meaning "length, jō (unit of length - equal to 3.03 metres), measure, Mr., Ms., height, stature, all (one has), only, that's all, merely" or 尊 (son, ta'to.i, touto.i, ta'to.bu, touto.bu, take) meaning "revered, valuable, precious, noble, exalted" with 瑠 (ryuu, ru) meaning "lapis lazuli", 流 (ryuu, ru, naga.su, -naga.su, naga.re, naga.reru) meaning "a sink, current, flow, forfeit", 琉 (ryuu, ru) meaning "gem, lapis lazuli, precious stone" or 留 (ryuu, ru, to.meru, to.maru, todo.meru, todo.maru, ruuburu) meaning "detain, fasten, halt, stop."... [more]
TOKAPCUP-KAMUY f Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu goddess (Kamuy) of the Sun, said to have raised Ae-oyna-kamuy.
TOYOTAMA-HIME f Japanese Mythology
The name of a goddess from the episode of the "Luck of the Sea and the Luck of the Mountain" in the Kojiki. Her name is derived from 豊 (toyo) meaning "abundant, lush", 玉 (tama) meaning "jewel, gem, ball" and 姫 (hime) meaning "princess".
USHIWAKAMARU m Japanese Mythology
Ushiwakamaru is a combination of 牛 (ushi), meaning "cow, bull"; 若 (waka), meaning "young"; and 丸 (maru), meaning "round". Maru was also a common ending for young boys' names in feudal Japan. Thus "young bull", with maru denoting it's a young child... [more]
YUSHKEP-KAMUY f Ainu, Far Eastern Mythology, Japanese Mythology
Ainu goddess (Kamuy) of spiders. She often assists Nusa-kor-kamuy in his tasks.