Polynesian Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of the various islands of the Pacific.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
AIAI m Polynesian Mythology
A male has this name in Hawaiian Mythology
ALULUEI m Polynesian Mythology
On the Caroline Islands the god of knowledge and navigation. He is the son of Palulop.
ĀROHIROHI f Polynesian Mythology
The name of the goddess of mirages and shimmering heat. Her name may be related to the word ārohi meaning "to scout, reconnoitre".
EITUMATUPUA m Polynesian Mythology
The god Eitumatupua climbed down from the sky on a great tree, and took a worm descendant, Ilaheva, as his wife.
HAUMEA f Polynesian Mythology
From the goddess of fertility and childbirth in Hawaiian mythology. A notable use of the name is the third dwarf planet from the Sun and second dwarf planet in the Kuiper belt (located between Pluto and Makemake).
HIʻIAKA f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Derived from Hawaiian hiʻi meaning "hold, carry" and aka "essence, embryo". This was the name of a Hawaiian goddess, the favorite sister of Pele.
HINA-MOE-AITU f Polynesian Mythology
Feminine name meaning "Hina sleeping with a god". In this case, Hina is a variant form of Sina.
HINE-KAU-ATAATA f Polynesian Mythology
Maori mythological character whose name means "Woman floating in shadows".
HINE-NUI-TE-PŌ f Polynesian Mythology
The name of the Maori goddess of night and death. Her name means "Great woman of night".
HIRO m Polynesian Mythology, Tahitian
Meaning unknown. Hiro was a demigod in Polynesian mythology.
IHI f Polynesian Mythology
The Tahitian goddess of wisdom and learning. Her name may refer to the Tahitian chestnut tree.
ILAHEVA f Polynesian Mythology
The god Eitumatupua climbed down from the sky on a great tree, and took a worm descendant, Ilaheva, as his wife.
KAHALAOMĀPUANA f Polynesian Mythology, Hawaiian (Rare)
A minor goddess, the fifth Maile sister. Combintion of ka "the", hala "pandanus", o "of" and māpuana "wafted fragrance".
KAHELEHA m Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
A legendary chief from native Hawaiian mythology.
KALAMAINU'U f Polynesian Mythology
Etymology unknown. This was the name of an Hawaiian lizard goddess.
KANALOA m Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
The god of the ocean in Hawaiian mythology.
KAʻŌHELO f Polynesian Mythology
Derived from ka meaning "the" and ʻōhelo referring to the ʻōhelo shrub. This was the name of the mortal sister of Pele.
KAULAAI-LEHUA f Polynesian Mythology
The name of a beautiful princess of Molokai.
KAWAUNUIAOLA f Polynesian Mythology
A woman has this name in Hawaiian Mythology
KOHARA f Polynesian Mythology
Kohara is the goddess of tuna, and is considered the "mother of all tuna fish". The word also means "to throw a flash of lightning, as a deity". In Māori mythology, lightning begat tuna. In that sense, Kohara can be considered the "ancestor of tuna".
m & f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
From the word meaning "upright."... [more]
KULEPE m Polynesian Mythology
A male has this name in Hawaiian Mythology
LAKA m & f Polynesian Mythology, Hawaiian (Rare)
From laka meaning "tame". This is the name of a goddess of the hula and a god of canoe makers, and a legendary hero.
LEA f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Goddess of canoe builders; wife of Ku-moku-hali'i; sister of Hina-puku-'ai; she takes the form of an 'elepaio (a forest bird)
LEWALEVU f Polynesian Mythology
The name of a fertility goddess in Fijian mythology, derived from lewa meaning "authority" and levu meaning "big, large".
LILINOE f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
From the word meaning "fine mist." A deity in Hawaiian mythology goes by this name, associated with Mauna Kea alongside Poliʻahu and Waiau.
LONO m Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
The god of "peace and prosperity, wind and rain" in Hawaii.
LUʻUKIA f Polynesian Mythology, Hawaiian (Rare)
Name of A legendary chiefess, sister of Kāwelu, daughter or wife of ʻOlopana.
MAHINA f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Means "moon, month" in Hawaiian, from Proto-Polynesian *masina. In Hawaiian mythology, Mahina is a lunar deity and the mother of Hema.
MAHUIKA f Polynesian Mythology, Maori (Rare)
Combination of the name Maui and the Polynesian root hika "to rub, to burn". In Māori mythology, Mahuika is a fire deity and the wife of Auahitūroa. The trickster Maui was said to have stolen fire from the goddess's fingernails.
MAKEMAKE m Polynesian Mythology
From the Rapa Nui mythology of Easter Island, was the creater of humanity and the god of fertility. A notable use of the name is for the fourth dwarf planet from the Sun and the third dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt.
MALIO f Polynesian Mythology
Name of a sorceress, sister of the Puna rascal, in Hawaiian Mythology.
MĀRIKORIKO f Polynesian Mythology
Means "twilight" in Maori. This is the name of the first woman according to some Maori tribal traditions.
PALULOP m Polynesian Mythology
Allegedly a sea god of the Caroline Islands.
PANIA f Maori, Polynesian Mythology
Pania, often styled "Pania of the Reef", is a figure of Māori mythology, and a symbol of the New Zealand city of Napier.
PATUTAI m Polynesian Mythology
Maori - Meaning hit the tide.
POLIʻAHU f Polynesian Mythology
The name of Hawaiian snow goddess and enemy of Pele. Her name is derived from poli meaning "bosom" and 'ahu meaning "garment, clothed".
RANGINUI m Polynesian Mythology, Maori, Cook Islands Maori
Derived from Rangi and nui meaning "large, big, vast, great." This is another name for the Maori god of the sky.
REAREA f Polynesian Mythology
The goddess of joy in Tahitian mythology. Her name may come from reʻareʻa, meaning "yellow".
SINA f Polynesian Mythology
The name of a number of figures in Samoan mythology. It is derived from sina meaning "white" or "grey haired".
TAONOUI f Polynesian Mythology
Etymology unknown. In Society Islands mythology, Taonoui is the mother of the stars.
TIKOKURA m Polynesian Mythology
"Storm-Wave". A Polynesian god of monstrous size and enormous power. He has an angry temperament which, without provoking, easily flares up.
TUMU-TE-ANA-OA f Polynesian Mythology
The personfication of echoes in Cook Islands mythology. Her name means "the cause of the call or voice heard from caves", from tumu meaning "cause", oa meaning "voice" and ana meaning "caves".
UMI m Polynesian Mythology
A king has this name in Hawaiian Mythology
VAEA m & f Tongan, Samoan, Tahitian, Polynesian Mythology
Meaning unknown, though it likely means "king, prince, noble, chief" based on the fact that the meaning of Mapu 'a Vaea, natural blowholes in Houma on the island of Tongatapu in Tonga, is known to be 'Whistle of the Noble/Chief/King' in Tongan... [more]
VARIMA-TE-TAKERE f Polynesian Mythology
Primordial mother goddess in Cook Islands mythology. Her name has been attested as meaning "goddess of the beginning" or "the mud at the bottom". It may be derived from vari meaning "mud" and takere meaning "bottom of a canoe".
WAKA f Polynesian Mythology
Name of a sorceress, grandmother of Laie-i-ka-wai.
WHAITIRI f Polynesian Mythology
Etymology unknown. This is the name of the blind, canibalistic goddess of thunder in Maori mythology.
WHAITIRI-MĀTAKATAKA f Polynesian Mythology
Means "crashing thunder" in Maori. This is one of the names of Whaitiri.