Names Categorized "spices"

This is a list of names in which the categories include spices.
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BART m English, Dutch
Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.
BASIL (1) m English
From the Greek name Βασιλειος (Basileios), which was derived from βασιλευς (basileus) meaning "king". Saint Basil the Great was a 4th-century bishop of Caesarea and one of the fathers of the early Christian church. Due to him, the name (in various spellings) has come into general use in the Christian world, being especially popular among Eastern Christians. It was also borne by two Byzantine emperors.
CASSIA f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of CASSIUS.
CORIANDER f English (Rare)
From the name of the spice, also called cilantro, which may ultimately be of Phoenician origin (via Latin and Greek).
GINGER f English
From the English word ginger for the spice or the reddish-brown colour. It can also be a diminutive of VIRGINIA, as in the case of actress and dancer Ginger Rogers (1911-1995), by whom the name was popularized.
KEZIA f Biblical
Variant of KEZIAH.
KEZIAH f Biblical
From the Hebrew name קְצִיעָה (Qetzi'ah) meaning "cassia, cinnamon", from the name of the spice tree. In the Old Testament she is a daughter of Job.
KIZZIE f English
Diminutive of KEZIAH.
KIZZY f English
Diminutive of KEZIAH. This particular spelling was repopularized in the late 1970s by a character in the book and miniseries 'Roots'.
LAUREL f English
From the name of the laurel tree, ultimately from Latin laurus.
NIGELLA f English (Rare)
Feminine form of NIGEL.
PIPRA f Esperanto
Means "peppery" in Esperanto.
ROSEMARY f English
Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.
SAFFRON f English (Rare)
From the English word that refers either to a spice, the crocus flower from which it is harvested, or the yellow-orange colour of the spice. It is derived via Old French from Arabic زعفران (za'faran), itself probably from Persian meaning "gold leaves".
SAGE f & m English (Modern)
From the English word sage, which denotes either a type of spice or else a wise person.
SALACIA f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin sal meaning "salt". This was the name of the Roman goddess of salt water.