Names Categorized "thunder"

This is a list of names in which the categories include thunder.
gender
usage
BORAN m Turkish
Means "thunderstorm" in Turkish.
BRONTE m & f English (Rare)
From a surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Ó Proinntigh meaning "descendant of Proinnteach". The given name Proinnteach meant "bestower" in Gaelic. The Brontë sisters - Charlotte, Emily, and Anne - were 19th-century English novelists. Their father changed the spelling of the family surname from Brunty to Brontë, possibly to make it coincide with Greek βροντή meaning "thunder".
BRONTES m Greek Mythology
Means "thunderer" in Greek. In Greek mythology (according to Hesiod), this was the name of one of the three Cyclopes, who were the sons of Uranus and Gaia.
GUNTUR m Indonesian
Means "thunder" in Indonesian.
HADAD m Semitic Mythology
Derived from a Semitic root meaning "thunder". Hadad was a Western Semitic (Levantine) god of thunder and storms, often called Ba'al. He was imported to Mesopotamia by the Amorites, where he was known as Adad to the Assyrians and Babylonians.
PERUN m Slavic Mythology
Means "thunder" in Slavic. In Slavic mythology Perun was the god of lightning, sometimes worshipped as the primary god. The oak was his sacred tree.
RA'D m Arabic
Means "thunder" in Arabic. This is the name of the 13th chapter of the Quran (surah ar-Rad).
RAIDEN m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (den) meaning "lightning". This is a regional epithet of the Japanese god Raijin.
RAIJIN m Japanese Mythology
From Japanese (rai) meaning "thunder" and (jin) meaning "god, spirit". This is the name of the god (or gods) of thunder and storms in the mythology of Japan.
TARANIS m Gaulish Mythology
Derived from Celtic taran meaning "thunder", cognate with Þórr (see THOR). This was the name of the Gaulish thunder god, who was often identified with the Roman god Jupiter.
THOR m Norse Mythology, Norwegian, Danish, Swedish
From the Old Norse Þórr meaning "thunder", ultimately from the early Germanic *Þunraz. Thor was the Norse god of strength, thunder, war and storms, the son of Odin. He was armed with a hammer called Mjolnir, and wore an enchanted belt that doubled his strength.
TONDRA f Esperanto
Means "thunderous", from Esperanto tondro meaning "thunder".