Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend Names

These names occur in Jewish, Christian or Islamic legends.
gender
usage
Adonai אֲדֹנָי m Theology
Means "my lord" in Hebrew. This was the title used to refer to the God of the Israelites, Yahweh, whose name was forbidden to be spoken.
Allah الله m Theology
Derived from Arabic الإله (al-ilah) meaning "the deity". It is primarily used to refer to the Islamic God, though it was originally used by pre-Islamic Arabs, and is sometimes used by Arabic-speaking Christians and Jews.
Azrael m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Variant of Azriel. This was the name of an angel in Jewish and Islamic tradition who separated the soul from the body upon death. He is sometimes referred to as the Angel of Death.
Balthazar m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Variant of Belshazzar. Balthazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus. He was said to have come from Arabia.
Barlaam m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Meaning unknown. In Christian legends Barlaam (recorded as Greek Βαρλαάμ) was a 3rd-century hermit who converted Josaphat, the son of an Indian king, to Christianity. The story is based on that of the Buddha. This name was also borne by two saints.
Belial בְּלִיַעַל m Biblical, Biblical Latin, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Means "worthless" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this term is used to refer to various wicked people. In the New Testament, Paul uses it as a name for Satan. In later Christian tradition Belial became an evil angel associated with lawlessness and lust.
Bilqis بلقيس f Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Meaning uncertain. According to Islamic tradition this was the name of the Queen of Sheba. She (but not her name) appears in the Quran.
Cassiel m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Hebrew קַפצִיאֵל (Qaftzi'el), of uncertain meaning. Suggested meanings include "speed of God" or "cover of God". This is the name of an angel in medieval Jewish, Christian and Islamic mysticism.
Castiel m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend, Popular Culture
Possibly a variant of Cassiel. It is the name of an angel in the grimoire the Heptameron, a work that is sometimes (probably incorrectly) attributed to the 13th-century philosopher Pietro d'Abano. It is also the name of a character (an angel) on the American television series Supernatural (2005-2020). The creator Eric Kripke chose it after an internet search revealed that Castiel was an angel associated with Thursdays, the day the show aired.
Christ m Theology
Modern English form of Christos 1.
Christos 1 Χριστός m Theology, Greek
From Greek Χριστός (Christos) meaning "anointed", derived from χρίω (chrio) meaning "to anoint". This was a name applied to Jesus by early Greek-speaking Christians. It is a translation of the Hebrew word מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach), commonly spelled in English messiah, which also means "anointed".... [more]
Dismas m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Derived from Greek δυσμή (dysme) meaning "sunset". This is the name traditionally assigned to the repentant thief who was crucified beside Jesus.
Gaspar m Spanish, Portuguese, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Spanish and Portuguese form of Jasper, as well as the Latin form.
Ioakeim Ἰωακείμ m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Greek form of Joachim, found in the apocryphal Gospel of James.
Israfil إسرافيل m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Meaning unknown. In Islamic tradition this is the name of the angel who will blow the trumpet that signals the coming of Judgement Day. He is sometimes equated with the angels Raphael or Uriel from Judeo-Christian tradition.
Izrail عزرائيل m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Arabic form of Azrael.
Jasper m English, Dutch, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Latin Gaspar, perhaps from the Biblical Hebrew word גִּזְבָּר (gizbar) meaning "treasurer", derived from Persian ganzabara. This name was traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since the Middle Ages. The name can also be given in reference to the English word for the gemstone.
Jehovah m Theology
Form of Yahweh used in older translations of the Bible, produced by blending the letters of the Tetragrammaton with the vowels from Adonai.
Jeremiel יְרַחְמְאֵל m Biblical, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Latin Hieremihel, probably from the Hebrew name Yerachme'el (see Jerahmeel). Jeremiel (also called Remiel or Uriel) is named as an archangel in some verions of the apocryphal book of 2 Esdras (preserved in Latin) in the Old Testament.
Jesus m Theology, Biblical, Portuguese
English form of Ἰησοῦς (Iesous), which was the Greek form of the Aramaic name יֵשׁוּעַ (Yeshu'a). Yeshu'a is itself a contracted form of Yehoshu'a (see Joshua). Yeshua ben Yoseph, better known as Jesus Christ, was the central figure of the New Testament and the source of the Christian religion. The four gospels state that he was the son of God and the Virgin Mary who fulfilled the Old Testament prophecies of the Messiah. He preached for three years before being crucified in Jerusalem.
Joachim m German, French, Polish, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Contracted form of Jehoiachin or Jehoiakim. According to the apocryphal Gospel of James, Saint Joachim was the husband of Saint Anne and the father of the Virgin Mary. Due to his popularity in the Middle Ages, the name came into general use in Christian Europe (though it was never common in England).
Lilith f Semitic Mythology, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
Lucifer m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Means "bringing light", derived from Latin lux "light" and ferre "to bring". In Latin this name originally referred to the morning star, Venus, but later became associated with the chief angel who rebelled against God's rule in heaven (see Isaiah 14:12). In later literature, such as the Divine Comedy (1321) by Dante and Paradise Lost (1667) by John Milton, Lucifer became associated with Satan himself.
Melchior m Dutch (Rare), Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Possibly from the Hebrew roots מֶלֶכְ (melekh) meaning "king" and אוֹר ('or) meaning "light". This was a name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who were said to have visited the newborn Jesus. According to medieval tradition he was a king of Persia.
Messiah m Theology, English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "saviour", ultimately from Hebrew מָשִׁיחַ (mashiyach) meaning "anointed". The word appears in the Old Testament referring to a future king of the Jewish people. In the New Testament it is translated as Christ and is used as a title of Jesus.
Phanuel Φανουήλ m Biblical, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Form of Penuel used in the New Testament, where it is borne by the father of Anna the prophetess. It also appears in the apocryphal Book of Enoch belonging to an angel.
Raguel m Biblical, Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Latin Raguhel, a scriptural variant of Reuel. This appears in some versions of the Old Testament at Exodus 2:18 as another name of Jethro, while other translations use Reuel. There is an archangel by this name mentioned in the apocryphal Book of Enoch.
Ramiel רָעמִיאֵל m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Possibly from Hebrew רָעמִיאֵל (Rami'el) meaning "thunder of God". The Book of Enoch names him as an archangel. He is often identified with Jeremiel.
Raziel רָזִיאֵל m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Means "my secret is God" in Hebrew. This is the name of an archangel in Jewish tradition.
Samael סַמָּאֵל m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Means "severity of God" in Hebrew. This is the name of an archangel in Jewish tradition, described as a destructive angel of death.
Satan שָׂטָן m Theology, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
Derived from Hebrew שָׂטָן (satan) meaning "adversary". This is the Hebrew name of the enemy of the Judeo-Christian god. In the New Testament he is also known by the title Devil (Diabolos in Greek).
Yahveh m Theology
Variant of Yahweh.
Yahweh m Theology
A name of the Hebrew God, represented in Hebrew by the Tetragrammaton ("four letters") יהוה (Yod Heh Vav Heh), which was transliterated into Roman script as Y H W H. Because it was considered blasphemous to utter the name of God, it was only written and never spoken, which resulted in the original pronunciation becoming lost. The name may have originally been derived from the old Semitic root הוה (hawah) meaning "to be" or "to become".
Yasu 2 يسوع m Theology (Arabized)
Form of Jesus used by Arabic-speaking Christians. Muslims use عيسى ('Isa), the form in the Quran.
Yehowah m Theology
Variant spelling of Yahweh.
Zadkiel צַדְקִיאֵל m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Means "God is my righteousness" in Hebrew. This is the name of an archangel associated with mercy in Jewish and Christian tradition, sometimes said to be the angel who stops Abraham from sacrificing his son Isaac.
Zephaniel m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
From Hebrew צָפַן (tzafan) meaning "to hide" and אֵל ('el) meaning "God". This is the name of an angel in medieval Jewish mysticism.
Zerachiel m Judeo-Christian-Islamic Legend
Possibly means "command of God" in Hebrew. The Book of Enoch names him as one of the seven archangels. His name is sometimes rendered as Sarakiel.