Names Categorized "virtue names"

This is a list of names in which the categories include virtue names.
gender
usage
Ajei f Indigenous American, Navajo
From Navajo ajéí meaning "heart".
Alheri f Western African, Hausa
Means "the charitable, the good" in Hausa, from Arabic خير (khayr).
Amity f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "friendship", ultimately deriving from Latin amicitia.
Ardito m Italian (Rare)
Derived from medieval Italian ardito meaning "bold".
Armo m Finnish (Rare)
Means "grace, mercy" in Finnish.
Atif m Arabic
Means "affection, kindness" in Arabic.
Blandus m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen meaning "charming" in Latin.
Bushra f Arabic, Urdu
Means "good news" in Arabic.
Chanan m Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Hanan 1.
Charity f English
From the English word charity, ultimately derived from Late Latin caritas "generous love", from Latin carus "dear, beloved". Caritas was in use as a Roman Christian name. The English name Charity came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
Chastity f English
From the English word chastity, which is ultimately from Latin castus "pure". It was borne by the child of Sonny Bono and Cher, which probably led to the name's increase in popularity during the 1970s.
Chifundo m & f Southern African, Chewa
Means "mercy" in Chewa.
Clemence f English
Feminine form of Clementius (see Clement). It has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it became rare after the 17th century.
Clemency f English (Rare)
Medieval variant of Clemence. It can also simply mean "clemency, mercy" from the English word, ultimately from Latin clemens "merciful".
Clement m English
English form of the Late Latin name Clemens (or sometimes of its derivative Clementius), which meant "merciful, gentle". This was the name of 14 popes, including Saint Clement I, the third pope, one of the Apostolic Fathers. Another saint by this name was Clement of Alexandria, a 3rd-century theologian and church father who attempted to reconcile Christian and Platonic philosophies. It has been in general as a given name in Christian Europe (in various spellings) since early times. In England it became rare after the Protestant Reformation, though it was revived in the 19th century.
Comfort f English (African)
From the English word comfort, ultimately from Latin confortare "to strengthen greatly", a derivative of fortis "strong". It was used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. It is now most common in parts of English-influenced Africa.
Constance f English, French
Medieval form of Constantia. The Normans introduced this name to England (it was the name of a daughter of William the Conqueror).
Dharma m Indian, Hindi, Telugu, Nepali
Means "that which is established, law, duty, virtue" in Sanskrit.
Eda 1 f Turkish
Means "well-mannered" in Turkish.
Evan m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Ifan, a Welsh form of John.
Faith f English
Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Felicita f Italian
Italian form of Felicitas. It also coincides closely with Italian felicità "happiness".
Felicity f English
From the English word felicity meaning "happiness", which ultimately derives from Latin felicitas "good luck". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans around the 17th century. It can sometimes be used as an English form of the Latin name Felicitas. This name jumped in popularity in the United States after the premiere of the television series Felicity in 1998. It is more common in the United Kingdom.
Gioia f Italian
Means "joy" in Italian.
Glory f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word glory, ultimately from Latin gloria.
Grace f English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.... [more]
Gwenda f Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 19th century.
Halima f Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Western African, Eastern African, Hausa, Swahili
Alternate transcription of Arabic حليمة (see Halimah), as well as the usual form in several other languages.
He f & m Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "river, stream", () meaning "harmony, peace", or () meaning "lotus, water lily" (which is usually only feminine). Other characters can form this name as well. A famous bearer was the 15th-century explorer Zheng He.
Honor f & m English (Rare)
Variant of Honour, using the American spelling.
Honour f English (Rare)
From the English word honour, which is of Latin origin. This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It can also be viewed as a form of Honoria or Honorata, which are ultimately derived from the same source.
Hope f English
From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Hyeon m & f Korean
From Sino-Korean (hyeon) meaning "virtuous, worthy, able" or other characters that are pronounced similarly. It usually occurs in combination with another character, though it is sometimes used as a stand-alone name.
Innocent m History (Ecclesiastical), English (African)
From the Late Latin name Innocentius, which was derived from innocens "innocent". This was the name of several early saints. It was also borne by 13 popes including Innocent III, a politically powerful ruler and organizer of the Fourth Crusade.... [more]
Ji-Hoon m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 지훈 (see Ji-Hun).
Ji-Hun m Korean
From Sino-Korean (ji) meaning "wisdom, intellect" or (ji) meaning "will, purpose, ambition" combined with (hun) meaning "meritorious deed, rank". This name can be formed by other hanja character combinations as well.
Joy f English
Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. It has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.
Justice m & f English
From an occupational surname meaning "judge, officer of justice" in Old French. This name can also be given in direct reference to the English word justice.
Kagiso m & f Southern African, Tswana
Means "peace" in Tswana.
Kazuyuki m Japanese
From Japanese (kazu) meaning "harmony, peace" and (yuki) meaning "happiness, good luck", as well as other combinations of kanji characters having the same reading.
Liberty f English
Simply from the English word liberty, derived from Latin libertas, a derivative of liber "free". Interestingly, since 1880 this name has charted on the American popularity lists in three different periods: in 1918 (at the end of World War I), in 1976 (the American bicentennial), and after 2001 (during the War on Terrorism).
Liêm m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (liêm) meaning "clean, honest, upright".
Mercy f English
From the English word mercy, ultimately from Latin merces "wages, reward", a derivative of merx "goods, wares". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Modesty f English (Rare)
From the English word modesty, ultimately from Latin modestus "moderate", a derivative of modus "measure".
Nabil m Arabic
Means "noble" in Arabic.
Naruhito m Japanese
From Japanese (naru) meaning "virtue" and (hito) meaning "compassionate". Naruhito (1960-) is the current emperor of Japan. Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
Nomusa f Southern African, Ndebele
Means "merciful" in Ndebele.
Patience f English
From the English word patience, ultimately from Latin patientia, a derivative of pati "to suffer". This was one of the virtue names coined by the Puritans in the 17th century. It is now most commonly used in African countries where English is widely understood, such as Nigeria and Ghana.
Peace f English (African)
From the English word peace, ultimately derived from Latin pax. This name is most common in Nigeria and other parts of Africa.
Piety f English (Rare)
From the English word meaning "piety, devoutness". This was a rare virtue name used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Pleasance f English (Archaic)
From the medieval name Plaisance, which meant "pleasant" in Old French.
Prosper m French, English
From the Latin name Prosperus, which meant "fortunate, successful". This was the name of a 5th-century saint, a supporter of Saint Augustine. It has never been common as an English name, though the Puritans used it, partly because it is identical to the English word prosper.
Prudence f & m English, French
Medieval English form of Prudentia, the feminine form of Prudentius. In France it is both the feminine form and a rare masculine form. In England it was used during the Middle Ages and was revived in the 17th century by the Puritans, in part from the English word prudence, ultimately of the same source.
Shlomit f Hebrew
Means "peaceful" in Hebrew.
Sincere m English (Modern)
From the English word meaning genuine or heartfelt.
Sonam f & m Tibetan, Bhutanese, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "virtuous, good karma, fortunate" in Tibetan.
Subira f Eastern African, Swahili
Means "patience" in Swahili.
Temperance f English
From the English word meaning "moderation" or "restraint". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century. It experienced a modest revival in the United States during the run of the television series Bones (2005-2017), in which the main character bears this name.
Thankful f English (Archaic)
From the English word thankful. This was one of the many virtue names used by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Themba m Southern African, Zulu, Xhosa, Ndebele
Means "trust, hope" in Zulu, Xhosa and Ndebele.
Trinh f & m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (trinh) meaning "virtuous, chaste, loyal".
Tuân m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (tuân) meaning "obey, follow, honour".
Unity f English (Rare)
From the English word unity, which is ultimately derived from Latin unitas.
Verity f English
From the English word meaning "verity, truth". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.
Virtudes f Spanish
Means "virtues" in Spanish.
Wisdom f & m English (Rare)
Simply from the English word, a derivative of Old English wis "wise".