Names Categorized "Vivy Fluorite Eye's Song characters"

This is a list of names in which the categories include Vivy Fluorite Eye's Song characters.
gender
usage
Antonio m Spanish, Italian, Croatian
Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see Anthony). This has been a common name in Italy since the 14th century. In Spain it was the most popular name for boys in the 1950s and 60s.... [more]
Elizabeth f English, Biblical
From Ἐλισάβετ (Elisabet), the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath", derived from the roots אֵל ('el) referring to the Hebrew God and שָׁבַע (shava') meaning "oath". The Hebrew form appears in the Old Testament where Elisheba is the wife of Aaron, while the Greek form appears in the New Testament where Elizabeth is the mother of John the Baptist.... [more]
Estella f English
Latinate form of Estelle. This was the name of the heroine, Estella Havisham, in Charles Dickens' novel Great Expectations (1860).
Grace f English
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
Katie f English
Diminutive of Kate.
Margaret f English
Derived from Latin Margarita, which was from Greek μαργαρίτης (margarites) meaning "pearl", a word that was probably ultimately a borrowing from an Indo-Iranian language. Saint Margaret, the patron of expectant mothers, was martyred at Antioch in the 4th century. Later legends told of her escape from a dragon, with which she was often depicted in medieval art. The saint was popular during the Middle Ages, and her name has been widely used in the Christian world.... [more]
Momoka f Japanese
From Japanese (momo) meaning "hundred" or (momo) meaning "peach" combined with (ka) meaning "flower" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Ophelia f English, Literature, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ὠφέλεια (opheleia) meaning "help, advantage". This was a rare ancient Greek name, which was either rediscovered or recreated by the 15th-century poet Jacopo Sannazaro for a character in his poem Arcadia. It was borrowed by Shakespeare for his play Hamlet (1600), in which it belongs to Hamlet's lover who eventually goes insane and drowns herself. In spite of this negative association, the name has been in use since the 19th century.
Osamu m Japanese
From Japanese (osamu) meaning "discipline, study", as well as other kanji that have the same pronunciation.
Tatsuya m Japanese
From Japanese (tatsu) meaning "achieve" combined with (ya) meaning "to be". Other kanji combinations having the same reading are also possible.
Yui f Japanese
From Japanese (yu) meaning "tie, bind" or (yu) meaning "excellence, superiority, gentleness" combined with (i) meaning "clothing, garment". It can also come from standalone (yui) using a different nanori reading. This name can be formed of other kanji or kanji combinations as well.