BOONE DIXON's Personal Name List

ABDUL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic, Pakistani, Urdu, Pashto

Other Scripts: عبد ال (Arabic, Urdu, Pashto)

Rating: 20% based on 1 vote

First part of compound Arabic names beginning with عبد ال ('Abd al) meaning "servant of the" (such as عبد العزيز ('Abd al-'Aziz) "servant of the powerful").

ADAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Russian, Ukrainian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Hebrew, Arabic, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: Адам (Russian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Macedonian), אָדָם (Hebrew), آدم (Arabic), ადამ (Georgian), Αδαμ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: A-dəm (English), a-DAWN (French), AH-dahm (German, Polish), AH:-dahm (Dutch), ah-DAHM (Russian, Ukrainian)

This is the Hebrew word for "man". It could be ultimately derived from Hebrew אדם ('adam) meaning "to be red", referring to the ruddy colour of human skin, or from Akkadian adamu meaning "to make". According to Genesis in the Old Testament Adam was created from the earth by God (there is a word play on Hebrew אֲדָמָה ('adamah) "earth"). He and Eve were supposedly the first humans, living happily in the Garden of Eden until Adam ate a forbidden fruit given to him by Eve.

As an English Christian name, Adam has been common since the Middle Ages, and it received a boost after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was Scottish economist Adam Smith (1723-1790).

ADRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian

Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)

Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), AHD-ryahn (Polish), AH-dree-ahn (German), ah-dree-AHN (Russian)

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

ALAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish, Breton, French

Pronounced: AL-ən (English)

The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.

This was the name of several dukes of Brittany, and Breton settlers introduced it to England after the Norman conquest. Famous modern bearers include Alan Shepard (1923-1998), the first American in space and the fifth man to walk on the moon, and Alan Turing (1912-1954), a British mathematician and computer scientist.

ALEX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch, German, French, Portuguese

Pronounced: AL-əks (English), AH-ləks (Dutch)

Personal note: kind of wish my name was.

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Short form of ALEXANDER, ALEXANDRA, and other names beginning with Alex.

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALGERNON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-jər-nahn

Originally a Norman French nickname, derived from aux gernons "having a moustache", which was applied to William de Percy, a companion of William the Conqueror. It was first used a given name in the 15th century (for a descendent of William de Percy).

ALICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Portuguese, Italian

Pronounced: AL-is (English), a-LEES (French), ah-LEE-che (Italian)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

From the Old French name Aalis, a short form of Adelais, itself a short form of the Germanic name Adalheidis (see ADELAIDE). This name became popular in France and England in the 12th century. It was borne by the heroine of Lewis Carroll's 'Alice's Adventures in Wonderland' (1865) and 'Through the Looking Glass' (1871).

AMANDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman

Pronounced: ə-MAN-də (English), ah-MAHN-dah (Spanish, Italian, German)

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.

AMBER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: AM-bər (English), AHM-bər (Dutch)

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

From the English word amber that denotes either the gemstone, which is formed from fossil resin, or the orange-yellow colour. The word ultimately derives from Arabic عنبر ('anbar). It began to be used as a given name in the late 19th century, but it only became popular after the release of Kathleen Winsor's novel 'Forever Amber' (1944).

AMBROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AM-broz

From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

AMY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AY-mee

Personal note: use in story. deceased.

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

English form of the Old French name Amée meaning "beloved" (modern French aimée), a vernacular form of the Latin Amata. As an English name, it was in use in the Middle Ages (though not common) and was revived in the 19th century.

ANTHONY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-thə-nee, AN-tə-nee

Personal note: use in story.

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

AUGUSTUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, Dutch

Pronounced: ə-GUS-təs (English), ow-KHUYS-tus (Dutch)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Means "great" or "venerable", derived from Latin augere "to increase". Augustus was the title given to Octavian, the first Roman emperor. He was the adopted son of Julius Caesar who rose to power through a combination of military skill and political prowess. This was also the name of three kings of Poland.

AVERY

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AY-vər-ee, AYV-ree

From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.

BALTHAZAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Judeo-Christian Legend

Variant of BELSHAZZAR. Baltazar is the name traditionally assigned to one of the wise men (also known as the Magi, or three kings) who visited the newborn Jesus.

BART

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: BAHRT

Personal note: use in story. best friend. deceased.

Rating: 40% based on 1 vote

Short form of BARTHOLOMEW. This name is borne by a cartoon boy on the television series 'The Simpsons'.

BEN (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: BEN

Short form of BENJAMIN or BENEDICT. A notable bearer was Ben Jonson (1572-1637), an English poet and playwright.

BOB

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: BAHB (English), BAWB (Dutch)

Short form of ROBERT. It arose later than Dob, Hob and Nob, which were medieval rhyming nicknames of Robert. A famous bearer is American musician Bob Dylan (1941-).

BONIFACE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English (Rare)

Pronounced: BAWN-ə-fays (English), BAWN-ə-fəs (English)

From the Late Latin name Bonifatius, which meant "good fate" from bonum "good" and fatum "fate". This was the name of nine popes and also several saints, including an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon missionary to Germany (originally named Winfrid) who is now regarded as the patron saint of that country. It came into use in England during the Middle Ages, but became rare after the Protestant Reformation.

BRUNO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, French, Croatian, Polish, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: BROO-no (German), BRUW-naw (Polish)

Derived from the Germanic element brun "armour, protection" or brun "brown". Saint Bruno of Cologne was a German monk of the 11th century who founded the Carthusian Order. The surname has belonged Giordano Bruno, a philosopher burned at the stake by the Inquisition.

CALEB

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Other Scripts: כָּלֵב (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: KAY-ləb (English)

Most likely related to Hebrew כֶּלֶב (kelev) meaning "dog". An alternate theory connects it to Hebrew כָּל (kal) "whole, all of" and לֵב (lev) "heart". In the Old Testament this is the name of one of the twelve spies sent by Moses into Israel. Of the Israelites who left Egypt with Moses, Caleb and Joshua were the only ones who lived to see the Promised Land.

As an English name, Caleb came into use after the Protestant Reformation. It was common among the Puritans, who introduced it to America in the 17th century.

CALLUM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: KAL-um

Variant of CALUM

CALVIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAL-vin

Derived from the French surname Chauvin, which was derived from chauve "bald". The surname was borne by Jean Chauvin (1509-1564), a theologian from France who was one of the leaders of the Protestant Reformation. His surname was Latinized as Calvinus (based on Latin calvus "bald") and he is known as John Calvin in English. It has been used as a given name in his honour since the 19th century.

CECIL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SEE-səl, SES-əl

Rating: 50% based on 1 vote

From the Roman name Caecilius (see CECILIA). This was the name of a 3rd-century saint, a companion of Saint Cyprian. Though it was in use during the Middle Ages in England, it did not become common until the 19th century when it was given in honour of the noble Cecil family, who had been prominent since the 16th century. Their surname was derived from the Welsh given name Seisyll, which was derived from the Roman name Sextilius, a derivative of SEXTUS.

CHARLES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: CHAHR-əlz (English), CHAHRLZ (English), SHAHRL (French)

From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic element hari meaning "army, warrior".

The popularity of the name in continental Europe was due to the fame of Charles the Great (742-814), commonly known as Charlemagne, a king of the Franks who came to rule over most of Europe. It was subsequently borne by several Holy Roman Emperors, as well as kings of France, Spain, Portugal, Sweden and Hungary. The name did not become common in Britain until the 17th century when it was carried by the Stuart king Charles I. It had been introduced into the Stuart royal family by Mary Queen of Scots, who had been raised in France.

Famous bearers of the name include naturalist Charles Darwin (1809-1882) who revolutionized biology with his theory of evolution, novelist Charles Dickens (1812-1870) who wrote such works as 'Great Expectations' and 'A Tale of Two Cities', French statesman Charles de Gaulle (1890-1970), and American cartoonist Charles Schulz (1922-2000), the creator of the 'Peanuts' comic strip.

CHAUNCEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: CHAWN-see

From a Norman surname of unknown meaning. It was used as a given name in American in honour of Harvard president Charles Chauncey (1592-1672).

COOPER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KOOP-ər, KUWP-ər

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

From a surname meaning "barrel maker" in Middle English.

COWESSESS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Native American, Ojibwe

Personal note: DURP

Rating: 10% based on 1 vote

Means "little child" in Ojibwe. This was the name of a late 19th-century chief of the Saulteaux.

DANIEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Slovene, Croatian, Macedonian, Armenian, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: דָּנִיֵּאל (Hebrew), Даниел (Macedonian), Դանիէլ (Armenian), დანიელ (Georgian), Δανιηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: DAN-yul (English), dah-nee-EL (Jewish), dan-YEL (French), DAH-nee-el (German), DAHN-yel (Polish)

Rating: 30% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name דָּנִיֵּאל (Daniyyel) meaning "God is my judge". Daniel was a Hebrew prophet whose story is told in the Book of Daniel in the Old Testament. He lived during the Jewish captivity in Babylon, where he served in the court of the king, rising to prominence by interpreting the king's dreams. The book also presents Daniel's four visions of the end of the world.

Due to the popularity of the biblical character, the name came into use in England during the Middle Ages. Though it became rare by the 15th century, it was revived after the Protestant Reformation. Famous bearers of this name include English author Daniel Defoe (1660-1731), Swiss mathematician Daniel Bernoulli (1700-1782), and American frontiersman Daniel Boone (1734-1820).

DARDEN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: DAHR-dən

From an English surname of unknown meaning, possibly from a place name.

DAVID

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Spanish, Portuguese, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: דָּוִד (Hebrew), Давид (Russian, Serbian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: DAY-vid (English), dah-VEED (Jewish), da-VEED (French), DAH-vit (German, Dutch), dah-VEET (Russian)

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was probably derived from Hebrew דוד (dwd) meaning "beloved". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.

This name has been used in Britain since the Middle Ages. It has been especially popular in Wales, where it is used in honour of the 5th-century patron saint of Wales (also called Dewi), as well as in Scotland, where it was borne by two kings. Famous bearers include empiricist philosopher David Hume (1711-1776), explorer David Livingstone (1813-1873) and soccer player David Beckham (1975-). This is also the name of the hero of Charles Dickens' semi-autobiographical novel 'David Copperfield' (1850).

DRAKE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DRAYK

From an English surname derived from the Old Norse given name Draki or the Old English given name Draca both meaning "dragon".

EVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: EV-ən (English)

Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.

GRANT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Scottish

Pronounced: GRANT

Rating: 80% based on 2 votes

From an English and Scottish surname which was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.

GREER

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: GREER

From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.

GROSVENOR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: GROV-ə-nər, GROV-nər

From an English surname which meant "great hunter" in Norman French.

HORACE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: HAWR-əs (English), o-RAHS (French)

English and French form of HORATIUS, and the name by which the Roman poet Quintus Horatius Flaccus is commonly known those languages. In the modern era it has been used as a given name since the Renaissance, in honour of the poet.

HRODULF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Germanic

Old Germanic form of RUDOLF

IAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: EE-ən (English)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Scottish form of JOHN

IVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Serbian, Croatian, Czech, Slovene, Macedonian, English

Other Scripts: Иван (Russian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Macedonian), Іван (Ukrainian)

Pronounced: ee-VAHN (Russian, Ukrainian), IE-vən (English)

Newer form of the old Slavic name Іѡаннъ (Ioannu), which was derived from Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). This was the name of six Russian rulers, including the 15th-century Ivan III the Great and 16th-century Ivan IV the Terrible, the first tsar of Russia. It was also borne by nine emperors of Bulgaria. Other notable bearers include the Russian author Ivan Turgenev (1818-1883), who wrote 'Fathers and Sons', and the Russian physiologist Ivan Pavlov (1849-1936), who is best known for his discovery of the conditioned reflex.

JAFAR

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: جعفر (Arabic)

Means "stream" in Arabic. This was the name of the brother of Ali, the fourth caliph, who was killed fighting against Byzantium in the 7th century. According to tradition, he later appeared to the Prophet Muhammad in the form of an angel.

JAMEEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: جميل (Arabic)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Variant transcription of JAMIL

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Personal note: used in story.

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JASON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, Greek Mythology (Anglicized), Biblical

Other Scripts: Ιασων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: JAY-sən (English)

From the Greek name Ιασων (Iason), which was derived from Greek ιασθαι (iasthai) "to heal". In Greek mythology Jason was the leader of the Argonauts. After his uncle Pelias overthrew his father as king of Iolcos, Jason went in search of the Golden Fleece in order to win back the throne. During his journeys he married the sorceress Medea, who helped him gain the fleece and kill his uncle, but who later turned against him when he fell in love with another woman.

This name also appears in the New Testament, belonging to man who sheltered Paul and Silas. In his case, it may represent a Hellenized form of a Hebrew name. It was not used in England until after the Protestant Reformation.

JAY (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAY

Short form of names beginning with the sound J, such as JAMES or JASON. It was originally used in America in honour of founding father John Jay (1749-1825), whose surname was derived from the jaybird.

JONATHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, Biblical

Other Scripts: יוֹנָתָן (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: JAHN-ə-thən (English), YO-nah-tahn (German)

Personal note: use in story.

Rating: 85% based on 2 votes

From the Hebrew name יְהוֹנָתָן (Yehonatan) (contracted to יוֹנָתָן (Yonatan)) meaning "YAHWEH has given". According to the Old Testament, Jonathan was the eldest son of Saul and a friend of David. He was killed in battle with the Philistines. As an English name, Jonathan did not become common until after the Protestant Reformation. A famous bearer was the Anglo-Irish satirist Jonathan Swift (1667-1745), who wrote 'Gulliver's Travels' and other works.

JULIUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman, English, German

Pronounced: YOO:-li-uws (Ancient Roman), JOO-lee-əs (English), YOO-lee-uws (German)

From a Roman family name which was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) "downy-bearded". Alternatively, it could be related to the name of the Roman god JUPITER. This was a prominent patrician family of Rome, who claimed descent from the mythological Julus, son of Aeneas. Its most notable member was Gaius Julius Caesar, who is known for his clever conquest of Gaul. After a civil war he became the dictator of the Roman Republic, but was eventually stabbed to death in the senate.

Although this name was borne by several early saints, including a pope, it was rare during the Middle Ages. It was revived in Italy and France during the Renaissance, and was subsequently imported to England.

LEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, English, Croatian, Late Roman

Pronounced: LE-o (German, Finnish), LAY-o (Dutch), LEE-o (English)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Derived from Latin leo "lion", a cognate of LEON. It was popular among early Christians and was the name of 13 popes, including Saint Leo the Great who asserted the dominance of the Roman bishops (the popes) over all others in the 5th century. It was also borne by six Byzantine emperors and five Armenian kings. Another famous bearer was Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910), a Russian novelist whose works include 'War and Peace' and 'Anna Karenina'. Leo is also the name of a constellation and the fifth sign of the zodiac.

LESZEK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Polish

Pronounced: LE-shek

Diminutive of LECH

LLEWELYN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Variant of LLYWELYN influenced by the Welsh word llew "lion".

MAAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Limburgish

Pronounced: MAHN

Limburgish short form of HERMAN

MAX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch

Pronounced: MAHKS (German), MAKS (English)

Personal note: use in story.

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Short form of MAXIMILIAN (or sometimes of MAXWELL in English).

MICHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Μιχαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: MIE-kəl (English), MI-khah-el (German), MEE-kah-el (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel). Other bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MISSY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIS-ee

Diminutive of MELISSA

NICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: NIK

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Short form of NICHOLAS

PATRICK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English, French, German

Pronounced: PAT-rik (English), pat-REEK (French), PAHT-rik (German)

Personal note: use in story. best friend. deceased.

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

From the Latin name Patricius, which meant "nobleman". This name was adopted in the 5th-century by Saint Patrick, whose birth name was Sucat. He was a Romanized Briton who was captured and enslaved in his youth by Irish raiders. After six years of servitude he escaped home, but he eventually became a bishop and went back to Ireland as a missionary. He is traditionally credited with Christianizing the island, and is regarded as Ireland's patron saint.

In England and elsewhere in Europe during the Middle Ages this name was used in honour of the saint. However, it was not generally given in Ireland before the 17th century because it was considered too sacred for everyday use. It has since become very common there.

PAUL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Biblical

Pronounced: PAWL (English), POL (French), POWL (German)

Personal note: PAUL!?!?!!?!!!?!!?!

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Saint Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church, his story told in Acts in the New Testament. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Most of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.

Due to the renown of Saint Paul the name became common among early Christians. It was borne by a number of other early saints and six popes. In England it was relatively rare during the Middle Ages, but became more frequent beginning in the 17th century. A notable bearer was the American Revolutionary War figure Paul Revere (1735-1818), who warned of the advance of the British army. Famous bearers in the art world include the French impressionists Paul Cezanne (1839-1906) and Paul Gauguin (1848-1903), and the Swiss expressionist Paul Klee (1879-1940). It is borne by British musician Paul McCartney (1942-). This is also the name of the legendary American lumberjack Paul Bunyan.

REECE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Anglicized form of RHYS

ROLF

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English

Pronounced: RAWLF (German)

From the Germanic name Hrolf (or its Old Norse cognate Hrólfr), a contracted form of Hrodulf (see RUDOLF). The Normans introduced this name to England but it soon became rare. In the modern era it has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world as a German import.

RONALDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Personal note: kind of wish my name was. use in story.

Rating: 60% based on 1 vote

Portuguese form of RONALD. A notable bearer is the retired Brazilian soccer player Ronaldo Luís Nazário de Lima (1976-), who is commonly known only by his first name.

RYAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: RIE-ən

Personal note: use in story.

Rating: 70% based on 1 vote

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendent of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).

SEXTUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Ancient Roman

Pronounced: SEKS-tuws

Roman praenomen, or given name, which meant "sixth" in Latin. It was traditionally given to the sixth child.

SHAWN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SHAWN

Personal note: kind of wish my name was.

Rating: 90% based on 1 vote

Anglicized form of SEÁN

SISSY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SIS-ee

Diminutive of CECILIA, FRANCES or PRISCILLA. It can also be taken from the nickname, which originated as a nursery form of the word sister.

THOMAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: Θωμας (Greek)

Pronounced: TAHM-əs (English), TOM-əs (English), to-MAH (French), TO-mahs (German, Dutch), tho-MAHS (Greek)

Personal note: kind of wish my name was.

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Greek form of the Aramaic name תָּאוֹמָא (Ta'oma') which meant "twin". In the New Testament this is the name of the apostle who initially doubts the resurrected Jesus. According to tradition he was martyred in India. Due to his renown, the name came into general use in the Christian world.

In England the name was introduced by the Normans and became very popular due to Saint Thomas Becket, a 12th-century archbishop of Canterbury and martyr. Another notable saint by this name was the 13th-century Italian philosopher and theologian Thomas Aquinas, who is regarded as a Doctor of the Church. Other famous bearers include philosopher Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679), American president Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), novelist Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), and inventor Thomas Edison (1847-1931).

Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.