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[Opinions] Romeo pronounciation?
Hi !!!How do you pronounce Romeo?I ask you because here this name is roh-MEH-oh similar to the Spanish surname Romero.But I don't know if there is the same pronounciation out of Italy...Tell me, please! XDAnd...WDYT about this name?? ^^
Any MN suggestion?ByeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeEvergreens: Anastasia Angelica Arthur Charlotte Cindy Eithne Ester Felix Fiammetta Harry Holly Jack Luna Odette Robin Romeo Saoirse Serena Stella Valentino Xavier

This message was edited by the author 1/12/2017, 12:54 AM

Tags:  pronunciation
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Ro-MEE-o._______________________________________________________________________________________________
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In the Midwest in the United States, it's pronounced ROH-mee-oh.
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ROH-mee-oh
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Yes, same here.
I know a few men named Romeo;not young men, though, no-one younger than 50. Seems it was quite popular then.
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The only real life Romeo I've ever encountered was a college basketball player on the opposing team when I was in pep band. We had quite a good time taunting him with his name whenever he was on our end of the court. Haha
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Here in Finland Romeo is pronounced as ROH-meh-oh: the first "o" is pronounced longer as if it's a double "o". The Swedish pronounciation in Forvo is quite close to how I pronounce Romeo (in Finnish context): https://fi.forvo.com/search/romeo/sv/Personally, I don't like Romeo that much. It reminds me too much of the Shakespeare play, whereas Juliet (or Julia, as the character's name is in Finnish) is much more versatile and usable.
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I've always heard it as ROW-me-oh, with Romeo and Juliet. But I noticed yesterday that there's an Italian car where it's Ruh-MAY-oh, and I didn't see a difference in spelling. I'd still say the 1st one, since I think thats how everyone would say it where I live. I'm not a big fan of Romeo, mostly because I dislike the play, so the constant association isn't really a good thing for me. I'm not too sure about middles, maybe:Romeo Sebastian
Romeo Alexander
Romeo Lysander
Romeo Perseus
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I can only speak for myself really. In South Africa we have a very small Italian community and I've never seen Romeo used by them or by anyone else here. If I did, I'd use your roh-MEH-oh pronunciation or as close to it as I can get.However, practically every South African who's ever been to high school has probably studied 'Romeo and Juliet', and the intonation pattern for both names is the same, so it'd be ROH-mee-oh and the same when it's used as a nn for the kind of man who falls in and out of love very quickly. One of David Beckham's sons is Romeo; no clue how he pronounces it, though I'd bet on ROH-mee-oh!
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Row-ME-Oh!
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