Names Categorized "honey"

This is a list of names in which the categories include honey.
gender
usage
Bai m & f Chinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
Elvia f Italian
Italian feminine form of Helvius.
Elvio m Italian
Italian form of Helvius.
Esti f Basque (Rare)
Means "sweet, honey", from Basque ezti.
Helvia f Ancient Roman
Feminine form of Helvius.
Helvius m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen derived from either Latin helvus meaning "honey-yellow, blond" or from the name of the Helvii, a Celtic tribe who lived west of the Rhône river. Gaius Helvius Cinna was a Roman poet of the 1st century BC.
Honey f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
Iracema f Indigenous American, Tupi
Means "honey lips" in Tupi, from yra "honey" and tembe "lips". This is the name of an 1865 novel by José de Alencar, about the relationship between a Tupi woman and a Portuguese man during the early colonial period. Alencar may have constructed the name so that it would be an anagram of America.
Jacira f Indigenous American, Tupi
Means "honey moon" in Tupi, from îasy "moon" and yra "honey".
Jarah m Biblical
Means "honeycomb" and "honeysuckle" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of a descendant of Saul.
Madhu f & m Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Tamil, Malayalam, Kannada, Telugu
From Sanskrit मधु (madhu) meaning "sweet, honey". This is another name of Chaitra, the first month of the Hindu year (which occurs in March and April).
Madhukar m Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "bee, honey-maker" in Sanskrit.
Meade m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that indicated one who lived on a meadow (from Middle English mede) or one who sold or made mead (an alcoholic drink made from fermented honey; from Old English meodu).
Melia f Greek Mythology
Means "ash tree" in Greek, a derivative of μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". This was the name of a nymph in Greek myth, the daughter of the Greek god Okeanos.
Mélina f French
French form of Melina.
Melina f English, Greek
Elaboration of Mel, either from names such as Melissa or from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". A famous bearer was Greek-American actress Melina Mercouri (1920-1994), who was born Maria Amalia Mercouris.
Méline f French
French form of Melina.
Melita f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Melite. However, in the case of Queen Victoria's granddaughter Princess Victoria Melita (1876-1936), it was derived from Melita, the Latin name of the island country of Malta where she was born.
Melite f Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey" (genitive μέλιτος). This is the name of several figures from Greek mythology, including a nymph who was the mother of Hyllus by Herakles.
Meliton m Ancient Greek, Georgian
Derived from Greek μέλι (meli) meaning "honey" (genitive μέλιτος). This was the name of a 2nd-century bishop of Sardis who is regarded as a saint in the Orthodox Church.
Miela f Esperanto
Means "sweet" in Esperanto, derived from mielo "honey", ultimately from Latin mel.
Miski f Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "honey" in Quechua.
Pamela f English
This name was invented in the late 16th century by the poet Sir Philip Sidney for use in his poem Arcadia. He possibly intended it to mean "all sweetness" from Greek πᾶν (pan) meaning "all" and μέλι (meli) meaning "honey". It was later employed by author Samuel Richardson for the heroine in his novel Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded (1740), after which time it became used as a given name. It did not become popular until the 20th century.
Pamelia f English
Elaborated form of Pamela.
Pamella f English
Variant of Pamela.
Permelia f English (Archaic)
Meaning unknown, possibly an early American alteration of Pamela.
Šárka f Czech
Meaning unknown. In Czech legend Šárka was a maiden who joined other women in declaring war upon men. She tricked the men by having herself tied to a tree, and, after they came to her rescue, offering them mead laced with a sleeping potion. After the men fell asleep the other women slew them.
Shahd f Arabic
Means "honey" in Arabic.
Yaara f Hebrew
Means "honeycomb" and "honeysuckle" in Hebrew.
Ya'rah m Biblical Hebrew
Hebrew form of Jarah.