Names Categorized "ice"

This is a list of names in which the categories include ice.
gender
usage
Ayaz m Turkish, Azerbaijani, Urdu
From Turkish and Azerbaijani ayaz meaning "frost" or "dry and cold air". This was the name of a slave and later companion of the 11th-century sultan Mahmud of Ghazni.
Crystal f English
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρύσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
Gerd 2 f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
From Old Norse Gerðr, derived from garðr meaning "enclosure". In Norse myth Gerd is a beautiful giantess (jǫtunn). Freyr falls in love with her, and has his servant Skírnir convince her to marry him.
IJsbrand m Dutch (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements is "ice, iron" and brand "sword".
Isa 3 m Frisian, Ancient Germanic
Short form of Germanic names beginning with the element is "ice, iron".
Isbrand m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of IJsbrand.
Iseult f Arthurian Romance
The origins of this name are uncertain, though some Celtic roots have been suggested. It is possible that the name is ultimately Germanic, from a hypothetical name like *Ishild, composed of the elements is "ice, iron" and hild "battle".... [more]
Ishild f Ancient Germanic (Hypothetical)
Germanic name, a hypothetical early form of Iseult.
Isolde f German, Arthurian Romance
German form of Iseult, appearing in the 13th-century German poem Tristan by Gottfried von Strassburg. In 1865 the German composer Richard Wagner debuted his popular opera Tristan und Isolde and also used the name for his first daughter.
Izotz m Basque
Means "ice" in Basque.
Jökull m Icelandic
Means "glacier, ice" in Icelandic.
Kawisenhawe f Indigenous American, Mohawk
Means "she holds the ice" in Mohawk, from ka- "she", ówise "ice" and -hawe "hold, have".
Kirsi f Finnish
Finnish form of Christina, or a short form of Kirsikka. It also means "frost" in Finnish.
Sarmīte f Latvian
From Latvian sarma meaning "frost".
Winter f English (Modern)
From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.