Brythonic Names

These names were used by the Britons. See Old Celtic names for a broader list.
gender
usage
Aneirin m Old Welsh, Welsh
Old Welsh name, possibly from the Latin name Honorius. This was the name of a 6th-century Brythonic poet, also known as Neirin or Aneurin, who is said to be the author of the poem Y Gododdin.
Angharad f Welsh, Old Welsh (Modernized), Welsh Mythology
From an Old Welsh name recorded in various forms such as Acgarat and Ancarat. It means "much loved", from the intensive prefix an- combined with a mutated form of caru "to love". In the medieval Welsh romance Peredur son of Efrawg, Angharad Golden-Hand is the lover of the knight Peredur.
Arthmail m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Armel.
Boadicea f Brythonic (Latinized)
Medieval variant of Boudicca, possibly arising from a scribal error.
Boudicca f Brythonic (Latinized)
Derived from Brythonic boud meaning "victory". This was the name of a 1st-century queen of the Iceni who led the Britons in revolt against the Romans. Eventually her forces were defeated and she committed suicide. Her name is first recorded in Roman histories, as Boudicca by Tacitus and Βουδουῖκα (Boudouika) by Cassius Dio.
Broccomaglos m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible Brythonic form of Brochfael.
Brochmail m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Brochfael.
Brychan m Old Welsh
Derived from Welsh brych meaning "speckled, freckled" combined with a diminutive suffix. Brychan Brycheiniog was a legendary Welsh king, said to be Irish by birth, the founder of the kingdom of Brycheiniog in central Wales. He reputedly fathered dozens of children, many of whom are regarded as saints.
Cadfan m Old Welsh
From an Old Welsh name, recorded in Latinized forms such as Catamanus, meaning "battle peak" from cat "battle" and bann "peak". Saint Cadfan, from Brittany, was a 6th-century missionary to Wales.
Cadoc m Old Welsh
From an Old Welsh name, recorded in Latinized forms such as Catocus, derived from cat meaning "battle". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who was martyred by the Saxons.
Caratācos m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible Brythonic form of Caratacus.
Caratacus m Brythonic (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Brythonic name *Caratācos meaning "loved", derived from the old Celtic root *karu "to love". According to Roman writers, this was the name of a 1st-century British chieftain who rebelled against Roman rule.
Caratauc m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Caradog.
Catell m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Cadell.
Catguocaun m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Cadwgan.
Cunobelinos m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible Brythonic form of Cunobelinus.
Cunobelinus m Brythonic (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Brythonic name, possibly from old Celtic * "dog, hound" (genitive *kunos) combined with either the name of the god Belenus or another Celtic root meaning "strong". This was the name of a 1st-century king of southeast Britain. He is known from Roman historians such as Suetonius and medieval Welsh histories, as well as from coins bearing his name.
Cynwrig m Old Welsh
Derived from Old Welsh cynt meaning "first, chief" and gur meaning "man", plus the suffix ig indicating "has the quality of".
Elisedd m Old Welsh
Derived from Welsh elus meaning "kind, benevolent". This was the name of two kings of Powys in Wales.
Enniaun m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Einion.
Grifud m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Gruffudd.
Guorthigirn m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Gwrtheyrn.
Gwladus f Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Gladys.
Gwrtheyrn m Old Welsh (Modernized)
From Old Welsh Guorthigirn meaning "supreme king", from guor meaning "over" and tigirn meaning "king, monarch". It is possible that this is not a name, but a title. According to medieval chroniclers, Gwrtheyrn (also known as Vortigern) was a 5th-century king of the Britons. It was he who invited the brothers Hengist and Horsa to Britain, which eventually led to the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.
Higuel m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Hywel.
Iorwerth m Welsh, Old Welsh
Means "worthy lord" from Old Welsh ior "lord" and gwerth "value, worth". This name was used by medieval Welsh royalty, including the prince Iorwerth Goch of Powys, who is mentioned in the tale the Dream of Rhonabwy. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Edward.
Iudgual m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Idwal.
Iudhail m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Ithel.
Iudris m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Idris 2.
Maglocunos m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible Brythonic form of Maelgwn.
Mailcun m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Maelgwn.
Margetud m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Meredith.
Matauc m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Madoc.
Mermin m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Merfyn.
Morcant m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Morgan 1.
Mouric m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Meurig.
Neirin m Old Welsh
Variant of Aneirin.
Ninniau m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Possible early form of Ninian.
Nynniaw m Old Welsh
Probably a Welsh form of *Ninniau (see Ninian). This form is used for Nennius in Brut y Brenhinedd, the Middle Welsh translation of the 12th-century Latin chronicles of Geoffrey of Monmouth. The name also appears in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen belonging to a man who is transformed into an ox.
Ougein m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Owain.
Riderch m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Rhydderch.
Ris m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Rhys.
Rotri m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Rhodri.
Seisyll m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Sextilius.
Toutorīxs m Brythonic (Hypothetical)
Older form (possibly) of Tudor 1.
Tutgual m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Tudwal.
Urbgen m Old Welsh
Old Welsh form of Urien.