Welsh Names

Welsh names are used in the country of Wales in Britain. See also about Welsh names.
gender
usage
Aderyn f Welsh (Rare)
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Aeron m & f Welsh
From the name of the Welsh river Aeron, itself probably derived from the hypothetical Celtic goddess Agrona. Alternatively, the name could be taken from Welsh aeron meaning "berries".
Aerona f Welsh
Variant of Aeron.
Aeronwen f Welsh (Rare)
Combination of Aeron and the Welsh element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
Aeronwy f Welsh (Rare)
Extended form of Aeron.
Afon f & m Welsh (Rare)
Means "river" in Welsh. This is a Welsh name of recent origin.
Aled m Welsh
From the name of a Welsh river, of uncertain meaning.
Alis f Welsh
Welsh form of Alice.
Alun m Welsh
Welsh form of Alan. It is also the name of two rivers in Wales.
Alwyn m Welsh
From the name of the River Alwen in northern Wales (a tributary of the River Dee).
Andreas m German, Greek, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Welsh, Ancient Greek, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Ancient Greek and Latin form of Andrew. It is also the form used in Modern Greek, German and Welsh.
Aneirin m Old Welsh, Welsh
Old Welsh name, possibly from the Latin name Honorius. This was the name of a 6th-century Brythonic poet, also known as Neirin or Aneurin, who is said to be the author of the poem Y Gododdin.
Aneurin m Welsh
Modern form of Aneirin.
Angharad f Welsh, Old Welsh (Modernized), Welsh Mythology
From an Old Welsh name recorded in various forms such as Acgarat and Ancarat. It means "much loved", from the intensive prefix an- combined with a mutated form of caru "to love". In the medieval Welsh romance Peredur son of Efrawg, Angharad Golden-Hand is the lover of the knight Peredur.
Anwen f Welsh
Means "very beautiful" in Welsh, from the intensive prefix an- combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed".
Arwel m Welsh
Old Welsh name of unknown meaning.
Arwyn m Welsh
From the Welsh intensifying prefix ar- and gwyn meaning "white, fair".
Awstin m Welsh
Welsh form of Austin.
Berwyn m Welsh
Means "white top" from the Welsh elements barr "top, head" and gwyn "white, fair". This is the name of a mountain range in Wales.
Bethan f Welsh
Welsh diminutive of Elizabeth.
Betrys f Welsh
Welsh form of Beatrice.
Bleddyn m Welsh
From Welsh blaidd "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an 11th-century king of Gwynedd and Powys.
Blodeuyn f Welsh (Rare)
Means "flower" in Welsh.
Blodwen f Welsh
Means "white flowers" from Welsh blodau "flowers" combined with gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is the name of an 1878 Welsh opera by Joseph Parry.
Branwen f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Old Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". According to the Second Branch of the Mabinogi she was the daughter of Llŷr. After she was mistreated by her husband Matholwch, the king of Ireland, she managed to get a message to her brother Brân, the king of Britain. Brân launched a costly invasion to rescue her, but she died of grief shortly after her return.
Briallen f Welsh (Rare)
Derived from Welsh briallu meaning "primrose". This is a modern Welsh name.
Bron f Welsh
Short form of Bronwen.
Bronwen f Welsh
Seemingly derived from Welsh bron "breast" and gwen "white, fair, blessed", though it has sometimes occurred as a variant spelling of the legendary name Branwen. It has been used as a given name in Wales since the 19th century. It is borne by a character in Richard Llewellyn's 1939 novel How Green Was My Valley, as well as the 1941 movie adaptation.
Bryn m & f Welsh, English (Modern)
Means "hill, mound" in Welsh. In Wales it is almost always a masculine name, though elsewhere in the English-speaking world it can be unisex (see Brynn).
Brynmor m Welsh
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
Cadell m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catell, derived from cat "battle" and a diminutive suffix. This was the name of two early kings of Powys in Wales.
Cadeyrn m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catigirn meaning "battle king", derived from cat "battle" and tigirn "king, monarch". This was the name of a 5th-century king of Powys in Wales, the son of Vortigern.
Cadfael m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catmail meaning "battle prince", from cat "battle" and mael "prince". This was apparently the birth name of Saint Cadoc. It was used by the British author Ellis Peters for the main character in her books The Cadfael Chronicles, first released in 1977.
Cadi f Welsh
Short form of Catrin.
Cadogan m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cadwgan.
Cadwalader m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cadwaladr.
Cadwaladr m Welsh
From Old Welsh Catgualatr (also recorded in many other spellings) meaning "leader of the battle", from cat "battle" and gwaladr "leader". This was the name of a 7th-century king of Gwynedd. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth he was the last king of all of the Britons. This name was also borne by a 7th-century Welsh saint.
Cadwgan m Welsh (Rare)
From Old Welsh Catguocaun (and many other spellings) meaning "glory in battle", from cat "battle" and guocaun "glory, honour". It appears briefly in the medieval Welsh tale The Dream of Rhonabwy.
Caerwyn m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements caer "fortress" and gwyn "white, fair".
Caradog m Welsh, Arthurian Romance
From the Old Welsh name Caratauc, a Welsh form of Caratācos. This is the name of several figures in Welsh history and legend, including an 8th-century king of Gwynedd, a 12th-century saint, and a son of Brân the Blessed. In Arthurian romance Caradog is a Knight of the Round Table. He first appears in Welsh poems, with his story expanded by French authors such as Chrétien de Troyes.
Caron f & m Welsh
From the name of places near the town of Tregaron in Ceredigion, Wales.
Carwyn m Welsh
Means "blessed love" from Welsh caru "to love" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This name was created in the 20th century.
Carys f Welsh
Derived from Welsh caru meaning "love". This is a relatively modern Welsh name, in common use only since the middle of the 20th century.
Catrin f Welsh, German
Welsh form of Katherine, as well as a German short form of Katharina.
Cefin m Welsh
Welsh form of Kevin.
Ceinwen f Welsh
Derived from Welsh cain "good, lovely" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This was the name of a 5th-century Welsh saint also known as Cain or Keyne.
Celyn m & f Welsh
Means "holly" in Welsh. It appears briefly in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen, belonging to son of Caw, but was not typically used as a given name until the 20th century.
Ceri f & m Welsh
Meaning uncertain. It could come from the name of the Ceri River in Ceredigion, Wales; it could be a short form of Ceridwen; it could be derived from Welsh caru meaning "to love".
Ceridwen f Welsh
Possibly from cyrrid "bent, crooked" (a derivative of Old Welsh cwrr "corner") combined with ben "woman" or gwen "white, fair, blessed". According to the medieval Welsh legend the Tale of Taliesin (recorded by Elis Gruffyd in the 16th century) this was the name of a sorceress who created a potion that would grant wisdom to her son Morfan. The potion was instead consumed by her servant Gwion Bach, who was subsequently reborn as the renowned bard Taliesin.... [more]
Cerridwen f Welsh
Variant of Ceridwen.
Cerys f Welsh
Variant of Carys.
Cledwyn m Welsh
Possibly derived from Welsh caled "rough, hard" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This is the name of a small river (Cledwen) in Conwy, Wales.
Colwyn m Welsh
From the name of a bay and seaside town in Conwy, Wales.
Cystennin m Welsh
Welsh form of Constantine.
Dafydd m Welsh
Welsh form of David. This name was borne by Dafydd ap Gruffydd, a 13th-century Welsh ruler, and Dafydd ap Gwilym, a 14th-century poet.
Dai m Welsh
Welsh diminutive of Dafydd.
David m English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
Deiniol m Welsh
Welsh form of Daniel.
Delwyn m Welsh
From Welsh del "pretty" combined with gwyn "fair, white, blessed". It has been used as a given name since the start of the 20th century.
Delyth f Welsh
From an elaboration of Welsh del "pretty". This is a recently created name.
Deryn f & m Welsh
Possibly from the Welsh word deryn, a variant of aderyn meaning "bird".
Dewi 1 m Welsh
Possibly from Dewydd, an Old Welsh form of David. Saint Dewi, the patron saint of Wales, was a 6th-century bishop of Mynyw. A later Welsh form of David was Dafydd, which was more common in the medieval period. Dewi was revived in the 19th century.
Dilwen f Welsh
Feminine form of Dilwyn.
Dilwyn m Welsh
From Welsh dilys "genuine" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". It has been used since the late 19th century.
Dilys f Welsh
Means "genuine" in Welsh. It has been used since the late 19th century.
Drystan m Welsh
Welsh form of Tristan.
Dylan m Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
From the Welsh prefix dy meaning "to, toward" and llanw meaning "tide, flow". According to the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Dylan was a son of Arianrhod and the twin brother of Lleu Llaw Gyffes. Immediately after he was baptized he took to the sea, where he could swim as well as a fish. He was slain accidentally by his uncle Gofannon. According to some theories the character might be rooted in an earlier and otherwise unattested Celtic god of the sea.... [more]
Dylis f Welsh
Variant of Dilys.
Efa f Welsh
Welsh form of Eva.
Eifion m Welsh
From an Old Welsh given name of unknown meaning, the source of the place name Eifionydd (also called Eifion) in northwestern Wales. This name was revived in the 19th century, probably via the place name.
Eiluned f Welsh
Variant of Eluned.
Eilwen f Welsh
Perhaps means "white brow", derived from Welsh ael "brow" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This is a recently created Welsh name.
Einion m Welsh
From the Old Welsh name Enniaun, probably from the Latin name Ennianus, a derivative of Ennius (see Ennio). It is also a modern Welsh word meaning "anvil". This was the name of a few early Welsh rulers including Einion Frenin (5th century), who is considered a saint in some Christian traditions.
Eira 1 f Welsh
Means "snow" in Welsh. This is a recently created name.
Eirian f & m Welsh
Means "bright, beautiful" in Welsh.
Eirlys f Welsh
Means "snowdrop (flower)" in Welsh, a compound of eira "snow" and llys "plant".
Eirwen f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh elements eira "snow" and gwen "white, blessed". This name was created in the early 20th century.
Eirwyn m Welsh
Masculine form of Eirwen.
Elain f Welsh
Means "fawn" in Welsh. This name was created in the 19th century.
Elen f Welsh, Armenian, Czech
Welsh and modern Armenian form of Helen, as well as a Czech variant form. This was the name of a 4th-century Welsh saint, traditionally said to be the wife of the Roman emperor Magnus Maximus. According to the Welsh legend The Dream of Macsen Wledig (Macsen Wledig being the Welsh form of Magnus Maximus), she convinced her husband to build the roads in Wales.
Eleri f Welsh
From the name of a Welsh river, also called the Leri, of unknown meaning. This was also the name of a 7th-century Welsh saint (masculine).
Elin f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh
Scandinavian and Welsh form of Helen.
Ellis m & f English, Welsh
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Elis, a medieval vernacular form of Elias. This name has also functioned as an Anglicized form of Welsh Elisedd.
Eluned f Welsh
Derived from Welsh eilun meaning "image, likeness, idol". This was the name of a legendary 5th-century Welsh saint, also known as Eiliwedd, one of the supposed daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog.
Emlyn m Welsh
From the name of an ancient region of southwestern Wales, its name meaning "around the valley" from Welsh am "around" and glyn "valley". It has also been suggested that this name is a Welsh form of Latin Aemilianus (see Emiliano), though this appears to be unfounded.
Emrys m Welsh
Welsh form of Ambrose. Emrys Wledig (or Ambrosius Aurelianus) was a Romano-British military leader who fought against the invading Anglo-Saxons in the 5th century. Tales of his life were used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth to help shape the early character of Merlin, whom he called Merlinus Ambrosius in Latin.
Emyr m Welsh
Means "king, lord" in Welsh.
Enfys f Welsh
Means "rainbow" in Welsh. This name was first used in the 19th century.
Enid f Welsh, English, Arthurian Romance
Probably derived from Welsh enaid meaning "soul, spirit, life". In Arthurian tales she first appears in the 12th-century French poem Erec and Enide by Chrétien de Troyes, where she is the wife of Erec. In later adaptations she is typically the wife of Geraint. The name became more commonly used after the publication of Alfred Tennyson's Arthurian poem Enid in 1859, and it was fairly popular in Britain in the first half of the 20th century.
Ercwlff m Welsh (Rare)
Welsh form of Hercules.
Esyllt f Welsh
Welsh form of Iseult.
Eurig m Welsh
Derived from Welsh aur meaning "gold" combined with a diminutive suffix.
Eurwen f Welsh
Derived from Welsh aur "gold" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
Evan m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Ifan, a Welsh form of John.
Ffion f Welsh
Means "foxglove" in Welsh (species Digitalis purpurea). This is a recently created Welsh name.
Fflur f Welsh
Welsh form of Flora.
Ffraid f Welsh
Welsh form of Bridget.
Ffransis m Welsh
Welsh form of Francis.
Gaenor f Welsh
Welsh variant of Gaynor.
Gareth m Welsh, English (British), Arthurian Romance
Meaning uncertain. It appears in this form in Thomas Malory's 15th-century compilation of Arthurian legends Le Morte d'Arthur, in which the knight Gareth (also named Beaumains) is a brother of Gawain. He goes with Lynet to rescue her sister Lyonesse from the Red Knight. Malory based the name on Gaheriet or Guerrehet, which was the name of a similar character in French sources. It may ultimately have a Welsh origin, possibly from the name Gwrhyd meaning "valour" (found in the tale Culhwch and Olwen) or Gwairydd meaning "hay lord" (found in the chronicle Brut y Brenhinedd).
Geraint m Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Meaning unknown, possibly a Welsh form of Gerontius. This was the name of a figure in various Welsh legends. He was also incorporated into Arthurian tales (the romance Geraint and Enid) as one of the Knights of the Round Table and the husband of Enid.
Gerallt m Welsh
Welsh form of Gerald.
Gethin m Welsh
Means "dark-skinned, swarthy" in Welsh.
Gladys f Welsh, English, French, Spanish
From the Old Welsh name Gwladus, probably derived from gwlad meaning "country". Alternatively, it may have been adopted as a Welsh form of Claudia. Saint Gwladus or Gwladys was the mother of Saint Cadoc. She was one of the daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog. This name became popular outside of Wales after it was used in Ouida's novel Puck (1870).
Glendower m Welsh
Anglicized form of Glyndwr.
Glenice f Welsh
Anglicized form of Glenys.
Glennis f Welsh
Anglicized form of Glenys.
Glenys f Welsh
Probably an elaboration of the Welsh word glân "pure, clean, holy" or glyn "valley". This name was created in the late 19th century.
Glyn m Welsh
Means "valley" in Welsh.
Glyndwr m Welsh
Given in honour of Owain Glyndwr (or Glyn Dŵr, Anglicized as Glendower), a 14th-century Welsh patriot who led a revolt against England. His byname means "valley water", and was probably inspired by the name of his estate at Glyndyfrdwy (meaning "valley of the River Dee").
Glynis f Welsh
Variant of Glenys.
Glynn m Welsh
Variant of Glyn.
Goronwy m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of Gronw. This form appears in the Book of Taliesin. It was borne by the Welsh poet Goronwy Owen (1723-1769).
Griffith m Welsh
Anglicized form of Gruffudd.
Gruffudd m Welsh
From the Old Welsh name Grifud, the second element deriving from Old Welsh iudd "lord, prince" but the first element being of uncertain meaning (possibly cryf "strong"). This was a common name among medieval Welsh royalty. Gruffudd (or Gruffydd) ap Llywelyn was an 11th-century Welsh ruler who fought against England.
Gruffydd m Welsh
Variant of Gruffudd.
Guto m Welsh
Diminutive of Gruffudd.
Gwallter m Welsh
Welsh form of Walter.
Gwawr f Welsh
Means "dawn" in Welsh.
Gwen f Welsh, English
From Welsh gwen, the feminine form of gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed". It can also be a short form of Gwendolen, Gwenllian and other names beginning with Gwen.
Gwenda f Welsh, English
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and da meaning "good". This name was created in the 19th century.
Gwendolen f Welsh
Possibly means "white ring", derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This name appears in Geoffrey of Monmouth's 12th-century chronicles, written in the Latin form Guendoloena, where it belongs to an ancient queen of the Britons who defeats her ex-husband in battle. Geoffrey later used it in Vita Merlini for the wife of the prophet Merlin. An alternate theory claims that the name arose from a misreading of the masculine name Guendoleu by Geoffrey.... [more]
Gweneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenfrewi f Welsh (Rare)
Derived from Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with another element of uncertain meaning. It could possibly be Welsh ffreu meaning "stream, flow" or the obscure word ffrewi meaning "pacify, quell, reconcile". This may be the original form of Winifred. In any case, it is the Welsh name for the saint.
Gwenith f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth, influenced by the Welsh word gwenith meaning "wheat".
Gwenllian f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and possibly lliain meaning "flaxen, made of linen" or lliant meaning "flow, flood". This name was used by medieval Welsh royalty, notably by a 12th-century princess of Deheubarth who died in battle with the Normans. It was also borne by the 13th-century daughter of Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the last prince of Gwynedd.
Gwenneth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwenyth f Welsh
Variant of Gwyneth.
Gwil m Welsh
Welsh short form of Gwilym.
Gwilim m Welsh
Welsh variant of Gwilym.
Gwillym m Welsh
Welsh variant of Gwilym.
Gwilym m Welsh
Welsh form of William.
Gwladys f Welsh
Variant of Gladys.
Gwydion m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Probably means "born of trees" from Old Welsh guid "trees" and the suffix gen "born of". In the Fourth Branch of the Mabinogi, Gwydion is the nephew of King Math of Gwynedd, and like him a powerful magician. In an elaborate plot to give his brother a chance to rape his uncle's footbearer, he arranged a war between Gwynedd and the neighbouring kingdom of Dyfed. Gwydion himself killed King Pryderi of Dyfed at the end of the war. In punishment for the rape, Math transformed Gwydion and his brother into different animals over the course of three years. Gwydion was the uncle of Lleu Llaw Gyffes, whom he fostered. Math and Gwydion fashioned Lleu a wife, Blodeuwedd, out of flowers and they later aided him after her betrayal. Gwydion also appears in older Welsh poetry such as the Book of Taliesin.
Gwyn m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "white, fair, blessed" in Welsh. In Welsh legend Gwyn was a king of the Otherworld and the leader of the Wild Hunt. He appears in the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen, where he is one of the many who help Culhwch hunt the monstrous boar Trwyth. The story also tells of his rivalry with Gwythyr for the beautiful Creiddylad.
Gwynedd f & m Welsh
From the name of the kingdom of Gwynedd, which was located in northern Wales from the 5th century. It is now the name of a Welsh county. The name may be related to Old Irish Féni meaning "Irish people", itself possibly related to the Celtic root *wēnā meaning "band of warriors".
Gwyneira f Welsh
Means "white snow" from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with eira meaning "snow". This is a recently created Welsh name.
Gwyneth f Welsh, English
Probably a variant of Gwynedd. It has been common in Wales since the 19th century, perhaps after the Welsh novelist Gwyneth Vaughan (1852-1910), whose real name was Ann Harriet Hughes. A modern famous bearer is the American actress Gwyneth Paltrow (1972-).
Gwynfor m Welsh
Derived from the Welsh element gwyn meaning "white, fair, blessed" combined with maur meaning "great, large". This name was created in the 19th century.
Gwynn m Welsh
Variant of Gwyn.
Haf f Welsh
Means "summer" in Welsh.
Harri m Finnish, Estonian, Welsh
Finnish, Estonian and Welsh form of Harry.
Haul m Welsh (Rare)
Means "sun" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Heddwyn m Welsh
Derived from Welsh hedd "peace" and gwyn "white, fair, blessed". This name has been given in honour of the poet Ellis Humphrey Evans (1887-1917), who used Hedd Wyn as his bardic name.
Hefin m Welsh
Means "summer" in Welsh, a poetic form of Haf.
Hefina f Welsh
Feminine form of Hefin.
Heledd f Welsh
Meaning unknown. This is the narrator of the medieval poem Canu Heledd, which laments the loss of her family, including her brother Prince Cynddylan, and the destruction of the kingdom of Powys in the 7th century.
Heulwen f Welsh
Means "sunshine" in Welsh (a compound of haul "sun" and gwen "white, fair, blessed").
Howell m Welsh
Anglicized form of Hywel.
Huw m Welsh
Welsh form of Hugh.
Hywel m Welsh
From Old Welsh Higuel meaning "eminent, prominent" (literally "well-seen"). This was the name of a few Welsh kings, including the 10th-century Hywel the Good who was known for establishing laws.
Iago m Welsh, Galician, Portuguese
Welsh and Galician form of Iacobus (see James). This was the name of two early Welsh kings of Gwynedd. It is also the name of the villain in Shakespeare's tragedy Othello (1603).
Ianto m Welsh
Diminutive of Ifan.
Idris 2 m Welsh
Means "ardent lord" from Old Welsh iudd "lord" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic". This name was borne by Idris the Giant, a 7th-century king of Meirionnydd.
Idwal m Welsh
From the Old Welsh name Iudgual derived from iudd "lord" combined with gual "ruler, leader".
Iefan m Welsh (Rare)
Older Welsh form of Ifan.
Iestyn m Welsh
Welsh form of Justin. This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint.
Ieuan m Welsh
Medieval Welsh form of Iohannes (see John), revived in the 19th century.
Ifan m Welsh
Modern form of Ieuan, a medieval Welsh form of Iohannes (see John).
Ifor m Welsh
Welsh form of Ivor.
Ilar m Welsh
Welsh form of Hilarius. This is the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint.
Illtyd m Welsh
From Old Welsh Eltut, derived from the intensive prefix el combined with tut "people, country". This was the name of a 6th-century Welsh saint who founded the abbey of Llanilltud in Glamorgan.
Ioan m Romanian, Welsh, Bulgarian
Romanian and Welsh form of John. This is also an alternate transcription of Bulgarian Йоан (see Yoan 2).
Iolo m Welsh
Diminutive of Iorwerth, used independently.
Iolyn m Welsh (Rare)
Diminutive of Iorwerth.
Iorwerth m Welsh, Old Welsh
Means "worthy lord" from Old Welsh ior "lord" and gwerth "value, worth". This name was used by medieval Welsh royalty, including the prince Iorwerth Goch of Powys, who is mentioned in the tale the Dream of Rhonabwy. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Edward.
Islwyn m Welsh
From the name of a mountain in Wales that means "below the forest" from Welsh is "below" and llwyn "forest, grove".
Ithel m Welsh
From the Old Welsh name Iudhail, cognate of Old Breton Iudicael (see Judicaël).
Ivor m Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland (Irish Íomhar), Scotland (Scottish Gaelic Iomhar) and Wales (Welsh Ifor).
Iwan m Welsh, Polish
Modern Welsh form of Ieuan, a medieval Welsh form of Iohannes (see John). It is also a Polish form of Ivan.
Leolin m Welsh
Anglicized form of Llywelyn influenced by Latin leo "lion".
Lleucu f Welsh
Meaning unknown, possibly derived from Lleu. This name appears in the 14th-century poem Marwnad Lleucu Llwyd, written by Llywelyn Goch ap Meurig Hen for his deceased lover Lleucu Llwyd.
Llew m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Variant of Lleu. It can also be a short form of Llewelyn. It coincides with the Welsh word llew meaning "lion".
Llewela f Welsh
Variant of Llewella.
Llewella f Welsh
Feminine form of Llywelyn.
Llewellyn m Welsh
Variant of Llewelyn.
Llewelyn m Welsh
Variant of Llywelyn influenced by the Welsh word llew "lion".
Llinos f Welsh
Means "linnet, finch" in Welsh. The linnet (species Linaria cannabina) is a small European bird in the finch family.
Llywelyn m Welsh
Probably a Welsh form of an unattested old Celtic name *Lugubelinos, a combination of the names of the gods Lugus and Belenus, or a compound of Lugus and a Celtic root meaning "strong". Alternatively it may be derived from Welsh llyw "leader". This was the name of several Welsh rulers, notably the 13th-century Llywelyn the Great who fought against the English.
Lowri f Welsh
Welsh form of Laura.
Luc m French, Welsh
French and Welsh form of Lucas (see Luke).
Luned f Welsh, Arthurian Romance
Form of Lunete used in the Welsh tale Owain, or the Lady of the Fountain (which was based on Chrétien's poem).
Madoc m Welsh (Rare)
From the Old Welsh name Matauc, derived from mad meaning "good, fortunate" combined with a diminutive suffix. This is the name of a warrior mentioned in the 7th-century Welsh poem Y Gododdin. It was also borne by several medieval rulers, including the 12th-century Madoc ap Maredudd, the last prince of Powys. Another bearer, according to later folklore, was a son of the 12th-century Owain the Great who sailed to the Americas.
Madog m Welsh (Rare)
Variant of Madoc.
Mair f Welsh
Welsh form of Maria (see Mary).
Mairwen f Welsh
Combination of Mair and Welsh gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".
Maldwyn m Welsh
From Maldwyn, another name for the old Welsh county of Montgomeryshire. It is so called from Trefaldwyn, the Welsh name for the county town of Montgomery, misinterpreting it as if meaning "town of Maldwyn". In fact it means "town of Baldwin" (in Welsh both m and b mutate to f).
Mallt f Welsh
Welsh form of Matilda.
Marc m French, Catalan, Welsh
French, Catalan and Welsh form of Marcus (see Mark).
Mared f Welsh
Welsh form of Margaret.
Marged f Welsh
Welsh form of Margaret.
Mari 1 f Estonian, Finnish, Welsh, Breton, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Georgian, Armenian
Estonian, Finnish, Welsh and Breton form of Maria, as well as a Hungarian diminutive of Mária. It is also a Scandinavian, Georgian and Armenian form of the French name Marie.
Martyn m Welsh, Manx, Ukrainian
Welsh, Manx and Ukrainian form of Martin.
Maxen m Welsh
Anglicized form of Macsen.
Megan f Welsh, English
Welsh diminutive of Margaret. In the English-speaking world outside of Wales it has only been regularly used since the middle of the 20th century.
Meical m Welsh
Welsh form of Michael.
Meinir f Welsh
Means "tall and slender, beautiful maiden" in Welsh (a compound of main "slender" and hir "tall").
Meinwen f Welsh
Means "slender and beautiful maiden" from a Welsh compound of main "slender" and gwen "white, fair, blessed".
Meirion m Welsh
From the name of the Welsh county of Meirionnydd, formerly a part of the kingdom of Gwynedd. It is probably derived from the Roman name Marianus.
Meiriona f Welsh
Feminine form of Meirion.
Meredith m & f Welsh, English
From the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd, from Old Welsh forms such as Margetud, possibly from mawredd "greatness, magnificence" combined with iudd "lord". The Welsh forms of this name were well used through the Middle Ages. Since the mid-1920s it has been used more often for girls than for boys in English-speaking countries, though it is still a masculine name in Wales. A famous bearer of this name as surname was the English novelist and poet George Meredith (1828-1909).
Meredydd m Welsh
Welsh form of Meredith.
Mererid f Welsh
Means "pearl, gem" in Welsh, derived from Latin margarita.
Merfyn m Welsh
From an Old Welsh name (recorded variously as Mermin, Merhin or Merwin), of uncertain meaning. It is possibly from mer "bone marrow" or mor "sea" with the second element possibly mynawg "eminent, noble", mynnu "wish, desire" or myn "young goat, kid". This was the name of a 9th-century king of Gwynedd, Merfyn Frych.
Mervyn m Welsh, English
Welsh variant of Merfyn, as well as the usual Anglicized form.
Meuric m Welsh
Variant of Meurig.
Meurig m Welsh
From Old Welsh Mouric, possibly a Welsh form of the Latin name Mauritius (see Maurice). This was the name of a few early Welsh kings (such as the 5th-century Meurig ap Tewdrig).
Mihangel m Welsh (Rare)
Welsh name of the archangel Michael, formed from a contraction of Michael and angel.
Morgan 1 m & f Welsh, English, French
From the Old Welsh masculine name Morcant, which was possibly derived from Welsh mor "sea" and cant "circle". Since the 1980s in America Morgan has been more common for girls than boys, perhaps due to stories of Morgan le Fay or the fame of actress Morgan Fairchild (1950-).
Morwenna f Cornish, Welsh
From Old Cornish moroin meaning "maiden, girl" (related to the Welsh word morwyn). This was the name of a 6th-century Cornish saint, said to be one of the daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog.
Mostyn m Welsh
From the name of a town in northern Wales, which is probably derived from Old English elements meaning "moss town".
Myf f Welsh
Short form of Myfanwy.
Myfanwy f Welsh
From the Welsh prefix my meaning "my, belonging to me" (an older form of fy) combined with either manwy meaning "fine, delicate" or banwy meaning "woman" (a variant of banw). This was the name of an 1875 Welsh song composed by Joseph Parry.
Myrddin m Welsh Mythology, Welsh
Original Welsh form of Merlin. It is probably ultimately from the name of the Romano-British settlement Moridunum, derived from Celtic *mori "sea" and *dūnom "rampart, hill fort". Prefixed with Welsh caer "fort", this town has been called Caerfyrddin (Carmarthen in English) from medieval times. It is thought that Caerfyrddin may have mistakenly been interpreted as meaning "fort of Myrddin", as if Myrddin were a personal name instead of a later development of Moridunum.... [more]
Neifion m Welsh (Rare)
Welsh form of Neptune.
Nerys f Welsh
Probably a feminized form of Welsh nêr meaning "lord".
Nest f Welsh
Medieval Welsh diminutive of Agnes.
Nesta f Welsh
Medieval Welsh diminutive of Agnes.
Nia 1 f Welsh
Welsh form of Niamh. The Welsh poet T. Gwynn Jones used it in his long poem Tir na n-Óg (1916), referring to the lover of Oisín.
Non f Welsh
Possibly derived from Latin nonna meaning "nun". According to tradition, this was the name of the mother of Saint David.
Nye m Welsh
Diminutive of Aneirin.
Ofydd m Welsh (Rare)
Welsh form of Ovid.
Olwen f Welsh, Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Means "white footprint" from Welsh ol "footprint, track" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". In the Welsh tale Culhwch and Olwen she was a beautiful maiden, the lover of Culhwch and the daughter of the giant Yspaddaden. Her father insisted that Culhwch complete several seemingly impossible tasks before he would allow them to marry.
Olwin f Welsh (Rare)
Variant of Olwen.
Olwyn f Welsh
Variant of Olwen.
Owain m Welsh, Arthurian Romance
From an Old Welsh name (Ougein, Eugein and other spellings), which was possibly from the Latin name Eugenius. Other theories connect it to the Celtic roots *owi- "sheep", *wesu- "good" or *awi- "desire" combined with the Old Welsh suffix gen "born of". This is the name of several figures from British history, including Owain mab Urien, a 6th-century prince of Rheged who fought against the Angles. The 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes adapted him into Yvain for his Arthurian romance Yvain, the Knight of the Lion. Regarded as one of the Knights of the Round Table, Yvain or Owain has since appeared in many other Arthurian tales, typically being the son of King Urien of Gore, and the errant husband of Laudine, the Lady of the Fountain.... [more]
Owen 1 m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Owain.
Owena f Welsh
Feminine form of Owen 1.
Padrig m Welsh, Breton
Welsh and Breton form of Patrick.
Pedr m Welsh
Welsh form of Peter.
Pryce m Welsh
Variant of Price.
Pryderi m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
From Welsh pryder meaning "care, worry" (or perhaps from a derivative word *pryderi meaning "loss"). Appearing in Welsh legend in all four branches of the Mabinogi, Pryderi was the son of Pwyll and Rhiannon, eventually succeeding his father as the king of Dyfed. He was one of only seven warriors to return from Brân's tragic invasion of Ireland, and later had several adventures with Manawydan. He was ultimately killed in single combat with Gwydion during the war between Dyfed and Gwynedd.
Reece m Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Rhys.
Rees m Welsh
Anglicized form of Rhys.
Reese m & f Welsh, English
Anglicized form of Rhys. It is also used as a feminine name, popularized by the American actress Reese Witherspoon (1976-).
Rheinallt m Welsh
Welsh form of Reynold.
Rhian f Welsh
Derived from Welsh rhiain meaning "maiden, young woman".
Rhiannon f Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from an unattested Celtic name *Rīgantonā meaning "great queen" (Celtic *rīganī "queen" and the divine or augmentative suffix -on). It is speculated that Rigantona was an old Celtic goddess, perhaps associated with fertility and horses like the Gaulish Epona. As Rhiannon, she appears in Welsh legend in the Mabinogi as a beautiful magical woman who rides a white horse. She was betrothed against her will to Gwawl, but cunningly broke off that engagement and married Pwyll instead. Their son was Pryderi.... [more]
Rhianon f Welsh
Variant of Rhiannon.
Rhisiart m Welsh
Welsh form of Richard.
Rhodri m Welsh
From the Old Welsh name Rotri, derived from rod "wheel" and ri "king". This name was borne by several medieval Welsh rulers, including Rhodri the Great, a 9th-century king of Gwynedd.
Rhonwen f Welsh
Welsh form of Rowena, appearing in medieval Welsh poems and stories as a personification of the English people.
Rhosyn f Welsh (Rare)
Means "rose" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Rhydderch m Welsh (Rare)
From the Old Welsh name Riderch, probably derived from ri "king" combined with derch "exalted". Rhydderch Hael was a 6th-century king of Strathclyde. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Roderick.
Rhys m Welsh, English
From Old Welsh Ris, probably meaning "ardour, enthusiasm". Several Welsh rulers have borne this name, including the 12th-century Rhys ap Gruffydd who fought against the invading Normans.
Roderick m English, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous ruler" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Walter Scott's 1811 poem The Vision of Don Roderick.... [more]
Sawyl m Welsh
Welsh form of Samuel.
Seren f Welsh
Means "star" in Welsh. This is a recently created Welsh name.
Shan f Welsh
Anglicized form of Siân.
Siân f Welsh
Welsh form of Jane.
Siana f Welsh
Diminutive of Siân.
Siani f Welsh
Diminutive of Siân.
Siarl m Welsh
Welsh form of Charles.
Sieffre m Welsh
Welsh form of Geoffrey.
Siôn m Welsh
Welsh form of John.
Sioned f Welsh
Welsh form of Janet.
Siôr m Welsh
Welsh form of George.
Siors m Welsh
Welsh form of George.
Siorus m Welsh
Welsh form of George.
Siwan f Welsh
Welsh form of Joan 1.
Steffan m Welsh
Welsh form of Stephen.
Taffy m Welsh
Anglicized form of Dafydd. It has been used as a slang term for a Welshman.
Talfryn m Welsh
From a Welsh place name meaning "front hill", derived from Welsh tal "front, extremity" and bryn "hill".
Taliesin m Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "shining brow", derived from Welsh tal "brow, head" and iesin "shining, radiant". This was the name of a semi-legendary 6th-century Welsh poet and bard, supposedly the author of the collection of poems the Book of Taliesin. He appears briefly in the Welsh legend Culhwch and Olwen and the Second Branch of the Mabinogi. He is the central character in the Tale of Taliesin, a medieval legend recorded in the 16th century, which tells how Ceridwen's servant Gwion Bach was reborn to her as Taliesin; how he becomes the bard for Elffin; and how Taliesin defends Elffin from the machinations of the king Maelgwn Gwynedd.
Tegan f Welsh, English (Modern)
Means "darling" in Welsh, derived from a diminutive of Welsh teg "fair, pretty". It was somewhat common in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Canada in the 1980s and 90s. It was borne by an Australian character on the television series Doctor Who from 1981 to 1984.
Tegid m Welsh
Possibly derived from Welsh teg "fair", or possibly from the Roman name Tacitus. This is the name of a lake in Wales, called Bala Lake in English. It also occurs in medieval Welsh legends as the husband of Ceridwen.
Tegwen f Welsh
Derived from the Welsh elements teg "fair" and gwen "white, fair, blessed". This name was created in the 19th century.
Tesni f Welsh
Means "warmth" in Welsh.
Tomi m Finnish, Hungarian, Welsh
Finnish, Hungarian and Welsh diminutive of Thomas.
Tomos m Welsh
Welsh form of Thomas.
Trefor m Welsh
Welsh form of Trevor.
Trev m Welsh, English
Short form of Trevor.
Trevor m Welsh, English
From a Welsh surname, originally taken from the name of towns in Wales meaning "big village", derived from Middle Welsh tref "village" and maur "large". As a given name it became popular in the United Kingdom in the middle of the 20th century, then caught on in the United States in the 1960s.
Trystan m Welsh
Variant of Tristan.
Tudful f Welsh (Rare)
Welsh form of Tydfil.
Tudor 1 m Welsh
Anglicized form of the medieval Welsh name Tudur, possibly from a hypothetical Celtic name *Toutorīxs meaning "ruler of the people" (cognate with Theodoric). As a surname it was borne by five monarchs of England beginning with Henry VII in the 15th century. These monarchs were descended from Owain ap Maredudd ap Tudur, a Welsh nobleman.
Tudwal m Welsh (Rare)
From the Old Welsh and Breton name Tutgual, derived from tut "people, country" and gual "ruler, leader". This was the name of a 6th-century Breton saint.
Twm m Welsh
Welsh short form of Tomos.
Tydfil f Welsh
Anglicized form of Welsh Tudful, of unknown meaning. This was the name of a (probably legendary) saint who is supposedly buried in the town of Merthyr Tydfil in Wales. It is possible the saint was named after the town. She is said to have been one of the daughters of Brychan Brycheiniog.
Vaughan m Welsh, English
From a Welsh surname that was derived from bychan (mutated to fychan) meaning "little".
Winifred f English, Welsh
From Latin Winifreda, possibly from a Welsh name Gwenfrewi (maybe influenced by the Old English masculine name Winfred). Saint Winifred was a 7th-century Welsh martyr, probably legendary. According to the story, she was decapitated by a prince after she spurned his advances. Where her head fell there arose a healing spring, which has been a pilgrimage site since medieval times. Her story was recorded in the 12th century by Robert of Shrewsbury, and she has been historically more widely venerated in England than in Wales. The name has been used in England since at least the 16th century.
Wyn m Welsh
Derived from Welsh gwyn meaning "blessed, white, fair".
Wynn m Welsh
Variant of Wyn.
Wynne 1 m & f Welsh
Variant of Wyn, sometimes used as a feminine form.
Yorath m Welsh (Rare)
Anglicized form of Iorwerth.