Irish Names

Irish names are used on the island of Ireland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Irish diaspora. See also about Irish names.
gender
usage
Ádhamh m Irish
Irish form of Adam.
Africa 2 f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Aifric.
Aidan m Irish, English (Modern)
Anglicized form of Aodhán. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it shares a sound with such names as Braden and Hayden. It peaked ranked 39th for boys in 2003.
Aideen f Irish
Anglicized form of Éadaoin.
Aifric f Irish
From Old Irish Affraic, possibly from Afraicc, the Old Irish name of the continent of Africa (see Africa 1). Alternatively, it could be from *Aithbrecc, an unattested earlier form of Aithbhreac. This was the name of two abbesses of Kildare in the 8th and 9th centuries. It was also borne by a 12th-century daughter of the king of the Isle of Mann who married the Anglo-Norman knight John de Courcy.
Aignéis f Irish
Irish form of Agnes.
Ailbhe f & m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Ailbe, possibly derived from the old Celtic root *albiyo- "world, light, white" or Old Irish ail "rock". In Irish legend this was the name of a female warrior of the Fianna. It was also the name of a 6th-century masculine saint, the founder of a monastery at Emly.
Ailís f Irish
Irish form of Alice.
Ailish f Irish
Anglicized form of Ailís.
Aindréas m Irish
Irish form of Andrew.
Aindriú m Irish
Irish form of Andrew.
Áine f Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "radiance, brilliance" in Irish. This was the name of a goddess of love and fertility in Irish legend, thought to dwell at the hill of Cnoc Áine in Limerick. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Anne.
Aingeal f Irish
Irish cognate of Angela.
Aisling f Irish
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Aislinn f Irish
Variant of Aisling.
Aithne f Irish (Rare)
Possibly a variant of Eithne.
Alannah f Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of Alana. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".
Alaois m Irish (Rare)
Irish form of Aloysius.
Alastar m Irish
Irish form of Alexander.
Alastríona f Irish
Feminine form of Alastar.
Alby m Irish
Anglicized masculine form of Ailbhe.
Amhlaoibh m Irish (Rare)
Irish form of Olaf.
Angus m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of Aonghus.
Anraí m Irish
Irish form of Henry.
Aodh m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
Aodhagán m Irish
Diminutive of Aodh (actually double diminutive).
Aodhán m Irish
From the Old Irish name Áedán meaning "little fire", a diminutive of Áed (see Aodh). This name was borne by a 6th-century king of Dál Riata. It was also the name of a few early Irish saints, including a 6th-century bishop of Ferns and a 7th-century bishop of Lindisfarne.
Aoibhe f Irish
Variant of Aoife.
Aoibheann f Irish
From Old Irish Oébfinn or Aíbinn, derived from oíb meaning "beauty, appearance, form" and finn meaning "fair, white". This was the name of the mother of Saint Énna of Aran. It was also borne by the daughter of the 10th-century Irish high king Donnchad Donn.
Aoibhín f Irish
Variant of Aoibheann.
Aoibhinn f Irish
Variant of Aoibheann. It also coincides with the related Irish word aoibhinn meaning "delightful, pleasant".
Aoife f Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Aífe, derived from oíph meaning "beauty" (modern Irish aoibh). This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a woman at war with Scáthach (her sister in some versions). She was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn, who spared her life on the condition that she bear him a child (Connla). Another legendary figure by this name appears in the Children of Lir as the jealous third wife of Lir.... [more]
Aonghus m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Óengus, possibly meaning "one strength" from óen "one" and guss "force, strength". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was an Irish god of love and youth, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He was the son of Dagda and Boann. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king, several Irish kings, and a few saints, including a 9th-century bishop of Tallaght.
Aran 1 m & f Irish
From the name of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland.
Ardal m Irish
Anglicized form of Ardghal.
Ardghal m Irish (Rare)
Means "high valour", derived from the Old Irish elements ard "high" and gal "valour".
Ashling f Irish
Anglicized form of Aisling.
Assumpta f Irish
Latinate form of Asunción, used especially in Ireland.
Báirbre f Irish
Irish form of Barbara.
Bairre m Irish
Diminutive of Finbar or Bairrfhionn.
Bairrfhionn m Irish (Rare)
Means "fair hair", derived from Old Irish barr "top, head" and finn "white, fair".
Barra m Irish
Diminutive of Finbar or Bairrfhionn.
Barry m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Barra.
Bearach m Irish (Rare)
Modern Irish form of Berach.
Bébhinn f Irish (Rare)
Modern form of Bébinn.
Bedelia f Irish
Irish diminutive of Bridget.
Bevin f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Bébinn.
Biddy f Irish, English
Diminutive of Bridget.
Bidelia f Irish
Diminutive of Bridget.
Bláithín f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Bláthíne.
Blanid f Irish
Anglicized form of Bláthnat.
Bláthnaid f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Bláthnat.
Bran 1 m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran mac Febail was a mariner who was involved in several adventures on his quest to find the Otherworld.
Breandán m Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Brendan.
Breda 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Bríd.
Brendan m Irish, English, Breton
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Old Irish name Bréanainn, which was derived from Old Welsh breenhin meaning "king, prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
Brian m English, Irish, Old Irish
Meaning uncertain, possibly related to the old Celtic root *brixs "hill, high" (Old Irish brií) or the related *brigā "might, power" (Old Irish briíg). It was borne by the Irish king Brian Boru, who thwarted Viking attempts to conquer Ireland in the 11th century. He was slain in the Battle of Clontarf, though his forces were decisively victorious. This name was common in Ireland after his time, and it was introduced to northern England by Norse-Gael settlers. It was also used in Brittany, and was brought to England by Bretons in the wake of the Norman Conquest. Though it eventually became rare in the English-speaking world, it was strongly revived in the 20th century, becoming a top-ten name for boys in most regions.
Bríd f Irish
Modern Irish form of Brighid.
Bride f Irish
Anglicized form of Bríd.
Bridget f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid, Old Irish Brigit, from old Celtic *Brigantī meaning "the exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
Bridie f Irish
Anglicized diminutive of Bríd.
Brighid f Irish, Irish Mythology
Newer Irish form of Brigit (see Bridget). Since the 1948 spelling reform, this name is spelled Bríd.
Brigid f Irish, Irish Mythology
Irish variant of Brighid (see Bridget).
Brogán m Irish (Rare)
From the Old Irish name Broccán, derived from bróc "shoe, sandal, greave" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several Irish saints, including Saint Patrick's scribe.
Brónach f Irish
Means "sad", derived from Irish brón meaning "sorrow". Saint Brónach was a 6th-century Irish mystic.
Bronagh f Irish
Anglicized form of Brónach.
Cahal m Irish
Anglicized form of Cathal.
Cahir m Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Cathaoir, possibly meaning "battle man" from Old Irish cath "battle" and fer "man".
Cairbre m Irish
Means "charioteer" in Irish. This was the name of two semi-legendary high kings of Ireland.
Cáit f Irish
Short form of Caitríona.
Caitlín f Irish
Irish form of Cateline, the Old French form of Katherine.
Caitlin f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Caitlín.
Caitria f Irish (Rare)
Possibly a form of Caitríona.
Caitríona f Irish
Irish form of Katherine.
Caoilfhionn f Irish
Derived from the Old Irish elements cáel "slender" and finn "fair, white". This was the name of several Irish saints.
Caoimhe f Irish
Derived from Irish caomh meaning "dear, beloved, gentle".
Caoimhín m Irish
Irish form of Kevin.
Caolán m Irish
From Irish caol meaning "slender" combined with the diminutive suffix án.
Caomh m Irish (Rare)
Means "dear, beloved, gentle" in Irish.
Caomhán m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Cóemán, derived from cóem "dear, beloved, gentle" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early Irish saints.
Carbrey m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cairbre.
Carbry m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Cairbre.
Carroll m Irish
Anglicized form of Cearbhall. A famous bearer of the surname was Lewis Carroll (1832-1898), whose real name was Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, the author of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
Cathair m Irish
Variant of Cathaoir.
Cathal m Irish, Old Irish
Derived from Old Irish cath "battle" and fal "rule". This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint. It was also borne by several Irish kings. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Charles.
Cathaoir m Irish (Rare)
Irish Gaelic form of Cahir.
Catriona f Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Caitríona (Irish) or Caitrìona (Scottish Gaelic).
Ceallach m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Cellach, of uncertain origin, traditionally said to mean "bright-headed". Alternatively it could be derived from Old Irish cellach "war, strife" or cell "church". This name was borne by several early Irish kings and by a 12th-century saint, an Archbishop of Armagh.
Cearbhall m Irish
From Old Irish Cerball, probably from cerb meaning "pointed, sharp, cutting". This was the name of a few medieval Irish kings.
Christy f & m English, Irish
Diminutive of Christine, Christina, Christopher and other names beginning with Christ. In Ireland this name is typically masculine, though elsewhere in the English-speaking world it is more often feminine (especially the United States and Canada).
Cian m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "ancient, enduring" in Irish. In Irish mythology this was the name of the father of Lugh Lámfada. It was also borne by the mythical ancestor of the Ciannachta and by a son-in-law of Brian Boru.
Cianán m Irish, Old Irish
Diminutive of Cian. This was the name of a 5th-century Irish saint.
Ciannait f Irish
Feminine form of Cian.
Ciar m & f Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Derived from Irish ciar meaning "black". In Irish legend Ciar was a son of Fergus mac Róich and Medb, and the ancestor of the tribe of the Ciarraige (after whom County Kerry is named). As a feminine name, it was borne by an Irish nun (also called Ciara) who established a monastery in Tipperary in the 7th century.
Ciara 1 f Irish
Feminine form of Ciar. This is another name for Saint Ciar.
Ciarán m Irish, Old Irish
Diminutive of Ciar. This was the name of two 6th-century Irish saints: Ciarán the Elder, the founder of the monastery at Saighir, and Ciarán the Younger, the founder of the monastery at Clonmacnoise.
Cillian m Irish
Probably from Old Irish cell meaning "church" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint who evangelized in Franconia. He was martyred in Würzburg.
Cillín m Irish
Variant of Cillian.
Cionaodh m Irish (Rare)
Modern Irish form of Cináed.
Clíodhna f Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Irish legend this was the name of a beautiful goddess. She fell in love with a mortal named Ciabhán and left the Land of Promise with him, but when she arrived on the other shore she was swept to sea by a great wave.
Clíona f Irish
Variant of Clíodhna.
Clodagh f Irish
From the Clodiagh, a small river in County Waterford, Ireland. It was first used as a given name by Clodagh Beresford (1879-1957), daughter of the Marquess of Waterford.
Coleman m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Colmán.
Colm m Irish
Variant of Colum.
Colmán m Irish, Old Irish
Diminutive of Colm (see Colum). This was the name of a large number of Irish saints.
Colum m Irish, Old Irish
Irish form of Columba. The Old Irish word columb or colum also means "dove", derived from Latin columba.
Comgán m Irish (Rare)
Old Irish form of Comhghán.
Comhghall m Irish (Rare)
Means "fellow hostage" from Old Irish com "with, together" and gíall "hostage". This was the name of a 6th-century saint, the founder of a monastery at Bangor, Ireland.
Comhghán m Irish (Rare)
Means "born together" from Old Irish com "with, together" and gan "born". Saint Comgán was the founder of a monastery at Killeshin in the 6th or 7th century.
Conall m Irish, Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "rule of a wolf", from Old Irish "hound, dog, wolf" (genitive con) and fal "rule". This is the name of several characters in Irish legend including the hero Conall Cernach ("Conall of the victories"), a member of the Red Branch of Ulster, who avenged Cúchulainn's death by killing Lugaid.
Conán m Irish, Old Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Conan.
Conan m Irish
Means "little wolf" or "little hound" from Irish "wolf, hound" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of several early saints, including a 7th-century bishop of the Isle of Man. It appears in Irish legend as a companion Fionn mac Cumhaill. A famous bearer of it as a middle name was Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930), the author of the Sherlock Holmes mystery stories. It is also the name of the hero of the Conan the Barbarian series of books, comics and movies, debuting 1932.
Concepta f Irish
Latinate form of Concepción, used especially in Ireland.
Conchúr m Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Conchobar.
Conleth m Irish
Anglicized form of the Old Irish name Conláed, possibly meaning "constant fire" from cunnail "prudent, constant" and áed "fire". Saint Conláed was a 5th-century bishop of Kildare.
Conley m Irish
Anglicized form of Conleth.
Conn m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Perhaps from Old Irish conn meaning "sense, reason" or cenn meaning "head, chief". This was the name of a legendary high king of Ireland, Conn of the Hundred Battles.
Connor m Irish, English (Modern)
Variant of Conor, based on the usual spelling of the surname that is derived from the name. This is currently the most common way of spelling it in the English-speaking world, apart from Ireland.
Conor m Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of Conchobar (or the Modern Irish form Conchúr).
Cormac m Irish Mythology, Irish
From Old Irish Cormacc or Corbmac, of uncertain meaning, possibly from corb "chariot, wagon" or corbbad "defilement, corruption" combined with macc "son". This is the name of several characters from Irish legend, including the semi-legendary high king Cormac mac Airt who supposedly ruled in the 3rd century, during the adventures of the hero Fionn mac Cumhaill. This name was also borne by a few early saints.
Cowal m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Comhghall.
Críostóir m Irish
Irish form of Christopher.
Croía f Irish (Modern)
From Irish croí meaning "heart". This name was used by Irish martial artist Conor McGregor for his daughter born 2019.
Dáibhí m Irish
Irish form of David.
Dáire m Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "fruitful, fertile" in Irish. This name is borne by many figures in Irish legend, including the Ulster chief Dáire mac Fiachna who reneged on his promise to loan the Brown Bull of Cooley to Medb, starting the war between Connacht and Ulster as told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Dáirine f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly derived from Dáire. This was the name of the daughter of the legendary Irish king Túathal Techtmar.
Dáithí m Irish
Means "swiftness, nimbleness" in Irish. This was the name of a semi-legendary high king of Ireland, also called Nathí. It is sometimes Anglicized as David.
Daithí m Irish
Variant of Dáithí.
Damhán m Irish
From Old Irish Damán meaning "calf, fawn", derived from dam "ox, deer" and a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an early Irish saint, a brother of Saint Abbán.
Damhnait f Irish
From Old Irish Damnat meaning "calf, fawn", a combination of dam "ox, deer" and a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by a 6th-century saint from Monaghan, as well as the 7th-century saint commonly called Dymphna.
Dara 1 m Irish
Anglicized form of Dáire.
Darach m Irish
Means "of oak" in Irish, from the genitive case of dair.
Daragh m Irish
Anglicized form of Dáire or Darach.
Darina 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Dáirine.
Darragh m Irish
Anglicized form of Dáire or Darach.
Deaglán m Irish
Irish form of Declan.
Dearbháil f Irish
From Old Irish Derbáil meaning "daughter of Fál", derived from the prefix der meaning "daughter" and Fál, a legendary name for Ireland.
Deasún m Irish
Irish shortened form of Deasmhumhain (see Desmond).
Declan m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Irish Deaglán, Old Irish Declán, which is of unknown meaning. Saint Declan was a 5th-century missionary to the Déisi peoples of Ireland and the founder of the monastery at Ardmore.... [more]
Deirbhile f Irish
Means "daughter of a poet" from Old Irish der "daughter" and fili "poet" (genitive filed). This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint, also called Dervla.
Deirdre f English, Irish, Irish Mythology
From the Old Irish name Derdriu, meaning unknown, possibly derived from der meaning "daughter". This was the name of a tragic character in Irish legend who died of a broken heart after Conchobar, the king of Ulster, forced her to be his bride and killed her lover Naoise.... [more]
Dermot m Irish
Anglicized form of Diarmaid.
Derry m Irish
Diminutive of Dermot.
Derval f Irish
Anglicized form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile.
Dervila f Irish
Anglicized form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile.
Dervla f Irish
Anglicized form of Dearbháil or Deirbhile.
Desmond m English, Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Deasmhumhain meaning "south Munster", referring to the region of Desmond in southern Ireland, formerly a kingdom. It can also come from the related surname (an Anglicized form of Ó Deasmhumhnaigh), which indicated a person who came from that region. A famous bearer is the South African archbishop and activist Desmond Tutu (1931-2021).
Devnet f Irish
Anglicized form of Damhnait.
Diarmaid m Irish, Irish Mythology
Meaning unknown, though it has been suggested that it means "without envy" in Irish. In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior who became the lover of Gráinne. It was also the name of several ancient Irish kings.
Doireann f Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from the Old Irish prefix der "daughter" and finn "white, fair". Alternatively it may be derived from Irish doireann meaning "sullen, tempestuous". This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a daughter of Bodb Derg who poisoned Fionn mac Cumhaill after he spurned her advances.
Domhnall m Irish
Irish form of Donald.
Donagh m Irish
Anglicized form of Donnchadh (see Duncan).
Dónal m Irish
Irish variant of Domhnall (see Donald).
Donal m Irish
Anglicized form of Domhnall (see Donald).
Donnacha m Irish
Irish variant of Donnchadh (see Duncan).
Donncha m Irish
Irish variant of Donnchadh (see Duncan).
Donnchadh m Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Duncan.
Dubhán m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Dubán meaning "little dark one", derived from dub "dark, black" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a few early saints.
Dymphna f History (Ecclesiastical), Irish
Form of Damhnait. According to legend, Saint Dymphna was a young 7th-century woman from Ireland who was martyred by her father in the Belgian town of Geel. She is the patron saint of the mentally ill.
Éabha f Irish
Irish form of Eve.
Éadaoin f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Étaín.
Eadbhárd m Irish
Irish form of Edward.
Éamon m Irish
Variant of Éamonn. This name was borne by American-born Irish president Éamon de Valera (1882-1975), whose birth name was Edward.
Eamon m Irish
Variant of Éamonn.
Éamonn m Irish
Irish form of Edmund.
Éanna m Irish
Modern Irish form of Énna.
Eavan f Irish
Anglicized form of Aoibheann.
Eibhlín f Irish
Irish form of Aveline.
Eileen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Eibhlín. It is also sometimes considered an Irish form of Helen. It first became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland near the end of the 19th century.
Eilís f Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Elizabeth (or sometimes of Alice).
Eilish f Irish
Anglicized form of Eilís.
Eimear f Irish
Variant of Éimhear.
Éimhear f Irish, Irish Mythology
Modern Irish form of Emer.
Éimhín m Irish
From Old Irish éim meaning "swift, prompt". This was the name of a 7th-century saint, the founder of a monastery in Kildare.
Einrí m Irish
Irish form of Henry.
Eireann f Irish (Rare)
From Éireann, the genitive case of Irish Gaelic Éire, meaning "Ireland". It is commonly Anglicized as Erin.
Eireen f Irish
Irish form of Irene.
Eithne f Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Possibly from Old Irish etne meaning "kernel, grain". In Irish mythology Eithne or Ethniu was a Fomorian and the mother of Lugh Lámfada. It was borne by several other legendary and historical figures, including a few early saints.
Elva 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Ailbhe.
Ena 1 f Irish
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Enda m Irish
Anglicized form of Éanna.
Enya f Irish
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Eoghan m Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly means "born from the yew tree", from Old Irish "yew" and the suffix gan "born". Alternatively, it might be derived from the Latin name Eugenius. It was borne by several legendary or semi-legendary Irish figures, including a son of the king Niall of the Nine Hostages.
Eoin m Irish
Irish form of Iohannes (see John) used in the Bible.
Erin f English, Irish
Anglicized form of Eireann. It was initially used by people of Irish heritage in America, Canada and Australia. It was rare until the mid-1950s.
Étaín f Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Possibly derived from Old Irish ét meaning "jealousy, passion". In Irish legend she is the subject of the 9th-century tale The Wooing of Étaín. She was the wife of Midir, but his jealous first wife Fuamnach transformed her into a fly. She was accidentally swallowed, and then reborn to the woman who swallowed her. After she grew again to adulthood she married the Irish high king Eochaid Airem, having no memory of Midir. Midir and Étaín were eventually reunited after Midir defeated Eochaid in a game of chess.
Ethna f Irish
Anglicized form of Eithne.
Fachtna m Irish, Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Possibly from Old Irish facht meaning "malice". This was the name of a legendary high king of Ireland, said in some traditions to be the husband of Neasa and the father of Conchobar.
Faolán m Irish (Rare)
Means "little wolf", derived from Old Irish fáel "wolf" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint who did missionary work in Scotland.
Feardorcha m Irish (Rare)
Means "dark man" from Old Irish fer "man" and dorchae "dark".
Fearghal m Irish
Modern Irish Gaelic form of Fergal.
Fearghas m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Fergus.
Fearghus m Irish
Irish form of Fergus.
Feidhlim m Irish
Modern Irish Gaelic form of Feidlimid.
Feidhlimidh m Irish (Rare)
Modern Irish Gaelic form of Feidlimid.
Feilim m Irish
Modern Irish Gaelic form of Feidlimid.
Felim m Irish
Anglicized form of Feidhlim.
Fergal m Irish, Old Irish
Means "man of valour", derived from the Old Irish elements fer "man" and gal "valour". This was the name of an 8th-century king of Ireland. As well as the Old Irish form of the name, this is the usual Anglicization of the Modern Irish form Fearghal.
Fergus m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Old Irish elements fer "man" and guss "vigour, strength, force". This was the name of several early rulers of Ireland and Dál Riata, as well as many characters from Irish legend. Notably it was borne by the hero Fergus mac Róich, who was tricked into giving up the kingship of Ulster to Conchobar. However, he remained loyal to the new king until Conchobar betrayed Deirdre and Naoise, at which point he defected to Connacht in anger. The name was also borne by an 8th-century saint, a missionary to Scotland.... [more]
Fiachra m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Fiachrae, possibly from fiach "raven" or fích "battle" combined with "king". This was the name of several legendary figures, including one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners: a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France, usually called Saint Fiacre.
Fiadh f Irish (Modern)
Means "wild, untamed" (modern Irish fia) or "respect" in Irish.
Fianna f Irish (Modern)
From Irish fiann meaning "band of warriors".
Fidelma f Irish
Latinized form of Fedelm.
Fillin m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Faolán.
Finbar m Irish
Anglicized form of Irish Fionnbharr, Old Irish Finnbarr, derived from finn "white, fair" and barr "top, head". Saint Finbar of Cork was a 6th-century bishop who supposedly performed miraculous cures. The Isle of Barra off Scotland was (probably) named for him.
Finbarr m Irish
Variant of Finbar.
Finn 1 m Irish Mythology, Old Irish, Irish, English, Dutch, German
Old Irish form of Fionn, as well as the usual Anglicized spelling of the name. As a surname it is borne by Huckleberry Finn, a character in Mark Twain's novels.
Finnian m Irish
Derived from Old Irish finn "white". This was the name of several Irish saints, including the founders of monasteries at Clonard and Movilla (both 6th century).
Finnuala f Irish
Variant of Fionnuala.
Finola f Irish
Anglicized form of Fionnuala.
Fintan m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Possibly means either "white fire" or "white ancient" in Irish. According to legend this was the name of the only Irish person to survive the great flood. This name was also borne by many Irish saints.
Fíona f Irish
Derived from Irish fíon meaning "wine".
Fionn m Irish, Irish Mythology
From the Old Irish name Finn, derived from finn meaning "fair, white". It occurs frequently in Irish history and legends, the most noteworthy bearer being Fionn mac Cumhaill, the central character of one of the four main cycles of Irish mythology, the Fenian Cycle. Fionn was born as Deimne, and acquired his nickname because of his fair hair. He grew all-wise by eating an enchanted salmon, and later became the leader of the Fianna after defeating the fire-breathing demon Áillen. He was the father of Oisín and grandfather of Oscar.
Fionnán m Irish
Diminutive of Fionn. This was the name of an early Irish saint.
Fionnbharr m Irish (Rare)
Modern Irish Gaelic form of Finbar.
Fionntan m Irish
Modern Irish Gaelic form of Fintan.
Fionnuala f Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "white shoulder" from Old Irish finn "white, fair" and gúala "shoulder". In Irish legend Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir who were transformed into swans for a period of 900 years.
Fionola f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Fionnuala.
Flann m & f Irish, Old Irish
Means "blood red" in Irish. This was the name of a 9th-century high king of Ireland.
Flannán m Irish, Old Irish
Diminutive of Flann. This was the name of a 7th-century saint.
Garbhán m Irish
From Old Irish Garbán meaning "little rough one", derived from garb "rough" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of a 7th-century Irish saint.
Garvan m Irish
Anglicized form of Garbhán.
Gearalt m Irish (Rare)
Irish form of Gerald.
Gearóid m Irish
Irish form of Gerard or Gerald.
Gobán m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Gobbán, derived from gobae "smith" and a diminutive suffix. It could also be a derivative of the name of the Irish smith god Goibniu (from the same root). This was the name of a few early saints, such as a 7th-century abbot of Killamery. In later folklore, the smith god and the saints seem to have conflated into the legendary figure Gobán Saor ("Gobán the builder"), a master architect and builder of churches.
Gobnait f Irish
Feminine form of Gobán. This was the name of a 6th-century Irish saint, the founder of a monastery at Ballyvourney.
Gobnet f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Gobnait.
Gofraidh m Irish
Irish form of Guðfriðr.
Gráinne f Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Possibly derived from Old Irish grán meaning "grain" or gráin meaning "hatred, fear". In the Irish legend The Pursuit of Diarmaid and Gráinne she escaped from her arranged marriage to Fionn mac Cumhaill by fleeing with her lover Diarmaid. Another famous bearer was the powerful 16th-century Irish landowner and seafarer Gráinne Ní Mháille (known in English as Grace O'Malley), who was sometimes portrayed as a pirate queen in later tales.
Grania f Irish
Latinized form of Gráinne.
Gréagóir m Irish
Irish form of Gregory.
Honora f Irish, English
Variant of Honoria. It was brought to England and Ireland by the Normans.
Íde f Irish
From Old Irish Íte, possibly derived from ítu meaning "thirst". This was the name of a 6th-century Irish nun, the patron saint of Killeedy.
Íomhar m Irish
Irish form of Ivor.
Ionatán m Irish
Irish form of Jonathan.
Isibéal f Irish
Irish form of Isabel.
Ita f Irish
Anglicized form of Íde.
Iúile f Irish
Irish form of Julia.
Ivor m Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland (Irish Íomhar), Scotland (Scottish Gaelic Iomhar) and Wales (Welsh Ifor).
Jarlath m Irish
Anglicized form of Iarlaithe.
Kathleen f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Caitlín.
Keavy f Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Caoimhe.
Keelan m Irish
Anglicized form of Caolán.
Keelin f Irish
Anglicized form of Caoilfhionn.
Keenan m Irish
Anglicized form of Cianán.
Keeva f Irish
Anglicized form of Caoimhe.
Kelly m & f Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name Ceallach or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).... [more]
Kennedy f & m English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Irish Gaelic Ó Cinnéidigh, itself derived from the given name Cennétig. The name has sometimes been given in honour of assassinated American president John F. Kennedy (1917-1963). It was popularized as a name for girls by Lisa Kennedy Montgomery (1972-), known simply as Kennedy, the host of the television program Alternative Nation on MTV from 1992 to 1997.
Kevin m English, Irish, French (Modern), Spanish (Modern), German (Modern), Dutch (Modern), Swedish (Modern), Norwegian (Modern), Danish (Modern)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Caoimhín meaning "beloved birth", derived from Old Irish Cóemgein, composed of cóem "dear, beloved, gentle" and gein "birth". Saint Caoimhín established a monastery in Glendalough, Ireland in the 6th century and is the patron saint of Dublin. It became popular in the English-speaking world outside of Ireland in the middle of the 20th century, and elsewhere in Europe in the late 20th century.
Kiera f Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciara 1.
Kieran m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Kieron m Irish, English
Anglicized form of Ciarán.
Kilian m German, Spanish, Irish, French
German and Spanish form of Cillian, as well as an Irish and French variant.
Killian m Irish, French
Anglicized form of Cillian, also used in France.
Kyran m Irish
Variant of Kieran.
Labhrás m Irish
Irish form of Laurence 1.
Lachtna m Irish (Rare)
From Old Irish Lachtnae meaning "milk-coloured", from lacht "milk" (borrowed from Latin). This was the name of a great-grandfather of the Irish king Brian Boru.
Laoghaire m Irish
Modern Irish form of Lóegaire.
Laoise f Irish
Possibly a newer form of Luigsech, or from the name of the county of Laois in central Ireland. It is also used as an Irish form of Lucy or Louise.
Léan f Irish
Irish form of Helen.
Leary m Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Laoghaire.
Líadain f Irish
Variant of Líadan.
Líadan f Irish (Rare)
Possibly from Old Irish líath meaning "grey". According to an Irish tale this was the name of a poet who became a nun, but then missed her lover Cuirithir so much that she died of grief. The name was also borne by a 5th-century saint, the mother of Saint Ciarán the Elder.
Liam m Irish, English, French (Modern), Dutch (Modern), German (Modern), Swedish (Modern)
Irish short form of William. It became popular in the United Kingdom in the 1980s, and elsewhere in Europe and the Americas after that. It was the top ranked name for boys in the United States beginning in 2017. Famous bearers include British actor Liam Neeson (1952-), British musician Liam Gallagher (1972-), and Australian actor Liam Hemsworth (1990-).
Lile f Irish (Rare)
Irish form of Lily.
Lochlainn m Irish, Old Irish
Means "Viking, Scandinavian" from Old Irish Lochlann, a name for Scandinavia. It means "land of the lakes", derived from loch "lake".
Lochlann m Irish
Variant of Lochlainn.
Lomán m Irish
Variant of Lommán.
Lonán m Irish, Old Irish
Means "little blackbird", derived from Old Irish lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by several early saints.
Lorcán m Irish
Means "little fierce one", derived from Old Irish lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Lorcán was a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.
Lúcás m Irish
Irish form of Lucas (see Luke).
Macdara m Irish, Old Irish
Means "son of oak" in Irish. This was the name of a 6th-century saint from Connemara.
Madailéin f Irish
Irish form of Magdalene.
Maeve f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Irish name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. She and her husband Ailill fought against the Ulster king Conchobar and the hero Cúchulainn, as told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Mághnus m Irish
Irish form of Magnus.
Mahon m Irish
Anglicized form of Mathúin.
Máighréad f Irish
Irish form of Margaret.
Mainchín m Irish
Means "little monk", derived from Old Irish manach "monk" combined with a diminutive suffix. This name was borne by two early saints.