Scottish Names

Scottish names are used in the country of Scotland as well as elsewhere in the Western World as a result of the Scottish diaspora. See also about Scottish names.
gender
usage
Ailean m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Alan.
Aileas f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Alice.
Ailis f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Alice.
Ailpean m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Alpin.
Ailsa f Scottish
From Ailsa Craig, the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland, which is of uncertain derivation.
Aindrea m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Andrew.
Ainsley f & m Scottish, English (Modern)
From an English surname that was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".... [more]
Alan m English, Scottish, Breton, French
The meaning of this name is not known for certain. It was used in Brittany at least as early as the 6th century, and it possibly means either "little rock" or "handsome" in Breton. Alternatively, it may derive from the tribal name of the Alans, an Iranian people who migrated into Europe in the 4th and 5th centuries.... [more]
Alasdair m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Alexander.
Alastair m Scottish
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alistair m Scottish
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Alister m Scottish
Anglicized form of Alasdair.
Allan m English, Scottish, Danish, Swedish, Estonian
Variant of Alan. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
Ally 2 m Scottish
Diminutive of Alistair.
Alpin m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic name Ailpean, possibly derived from a Pictish word meaning "white". This was the name of two kings of Dál Riata and two kings of the Picts in the 8th and 9th centuries.
Amhlaidh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Olaf.
Angus m Scottish, Irish, English
Anglicized form of Aonghus.
Anna f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Armenian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Scottish Gaelic, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see Hannah) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
Annag f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic diminutive of Anna.
Aodh m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
Aonghas m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Aonghus.
Aonghus m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Óengus, possibly meaning "one strength" from óen "one" and guss "force, strength". Aonghus (sometimes surnamed Mac Og meaning "young son") was an Irish god of love and youth, one of the Tuatha Dé Danann. He was the son of Dagda and Boann. The name was also borne by an 8th-century Pictish king, several Irish kings, and a few saints, including a 9th-century bishop of Tallaght.
Archibald m Scottish, English
Derived from the Germanic elements ercan "genuine" and bald "bold". The first element was altered due to the influence of Greek names beginning with the element ἀρχός (archos) meaning "master". The Normans brought this name to England. It first became common in Scotland in the Middle Ages (sometimes used to Anglicize the Gaelic name Gilleasbuig, for unknown reasons).
Archie m Scottish, English
Diminutive of Archibald. This name is borne by Archie Andrews, an American comic-book character created in 1941. It was also used by Prince Harry and Meghan Markle for the name of their son born 2019.
Arran m Scottish
From the name of an island off the west coast of Scotland in the Firth of Clyde.
Artair m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Arthur.
Athol m & f Scottish
From Atholl, the name of a district in Scotland, from Scottish Gaelic Athall, possibly derived from Old Irish ath Fhotla "new Ireland".
Aulay m Scottish
Anglicized form of Amhlaidh.
Barabal f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Barbara.
Beathag f Scottish Gaelic
Feminine form of Beathan.
Beathan m Scottish Gaelic
Derived from a diminutive of Scottish Gaelic beatha meaning "life".
Beitris f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Beatrice.
Bhaltair m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Walter.
Bhàtair m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Walter.
Blair m & f Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic blàr meaning "plain, field, battlefield". In Scotland this name is typically masculine.... [more]
Bruce m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, of Norman origin, which probably originally referred to the town of Brix in France. The surname was borne by Robert the Bruce, a Scottish hero of the 14th century who achieved independence from England and became the king of Scotland. It has been in use as a given name in the English-speaking world since the 19th century, becoming especially popular in the 1940s and 50s. Notable bearers include Chinese-American actor Bruce Lee (1940-1973), American musician Bruce Springsteen (1949-), and American actor Bruce Willis (1955-).
Cailean m Scottish Gaelic
Means "whelp, young dog" in Scottish Gaelic. This name was borne by Cailean Mór, a 13th-century Scottish lord and ancestor of Clan Campbell.
Cairistìona f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Christina.
Caitrìona f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Katherine.
Callum m Scottish
Variant of Calum.
Calum m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Columba.
Catrina f Scottish
Anglicized form of Caitrìona.
Catriona f Irish, Scottish
Anglicized form of Caitríona (Irish) or Caitrìona (Scottish Gaelic).
Ciorstaidh f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Kirsty.
Coinneach m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of the Old Irish name Cainnech, derived from caín meaning "handsome, fair". It is often Anglicized as Kenneth. It is also used as a modern Scottish Gaelic form of the unrelated name Cináed.
Colin 1 m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Scottish Cailean.
Craig m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was derived from Gaelic creag meaning "crag, rocks, outcrop", originally indicating a person who lived near a crag.
Dàibhidh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of David.
Daividh m Scottish (Rare)
Partially Anglicized variant of Dàibhidh.
Dand m Scots
Scots diminutive of Andrew.
David m English, Hebrew, French, Scottish, Welsh, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Slovene, Russian, Croatian, Serbian, Macedonian, Romanian, Biblical, Biblical Latin
From the Hebrew name דָּוִד (Dawid), which was derived from Hebrew דּוֹד (dod) meaning "beloved" or "uncle". David was the second and greatest of the kings of Israel, ruling in the 10th century BC. Several stories about him are told in the Old Testament, including his defeat of Goliath, a giant Philistine. According to the New Testament, Jesus was descended from him.... [more]
Davie m English, Scottish
Diminutive of David.
Deòiridh f Scottish Gaelic
Means "pilgrim" in Scottish Gaelic.
Deòrsa m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of George.
Dermid m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Diarmad.
Dòmhnall m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Donald.
Donald m Scottish, English
From the Scottish Gaelic name Dòmhnall meaning "ruler of the world", composed of the Old Irish elements domun "world" and fal "rule". This was the name of two 9th-century kings of the Scots and Picts. It has traditionally been very popular in Scotland, and during the 20th century it became common in the rest of the English-speaking world. This is the name of one of Walt Disney's most popular cartoon characters, Donald Duck, introduced 1931. It was also borne by Australian cricket player Donald Bradman (1908-2001) and former American president Donald Trump (1946-).
Donalda f Scottish
Feminine form of Donald.
Donaldina f Scottish
Feminine form of Donald.
Donella f Scottish
Feminine form of Donald.
Donnchadh m Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Duncan.
Dougal m Scottish
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic name Dubhghall meaning "dark stranger", from Old Irish dub "dark" and gall "stranger". This name was borne by a few medieval Scottish chiefs.
Douglas m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was from the name of a town in Lanarkshire, itself named after a tributary of the River Clyde called the Douglas Water. It means "dark river", derived from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river" (an archaic word related to glas "grey, green"). This was a Scottish Lowland clan, the leaders of which were powerful earls in the medieval period. The Gaelic form is Dùghlas or Dùbhghlas. It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
Dugald m Scottish
Scottish variant of Dougal.
Duncan m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of the Scottish Gaelic name Donnchadh, derived from Old Irish donn "brown" and cath "battle". This was the name of two kings of Scotland, including the one who was featured in Shakespeare's play Macbeth (1606).
Eachann m Scottish Gaelic
From the Old Irish name Echdonn meaning "brown horse", from ech "horse" and donn "brown". This name was historically common among the chiefs of Clan MacLean. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Hector.
Ealar m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Hilary.
Ealasaid f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Elizabeth.
Eanraig m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Henry.
Effie f English, Scottish
Diminutive of Euphemia. In Scotland it has been used as an Anglicized form of Oighrig.
Èibhlin f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Aveline.
Eideard m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Edward.
Eilidh f Scottish Gaelic
Diminutive of Eilionoir, also taken to be a Gaelic form of Helen.
Eilionoir f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Eleanor.
Eimhir f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Emer.
Ellar m Scottish
Anglicized form of Ealar.
Elspet f Scottish
Scottish form of Elizabeth.
Elspeth f Scottish
Scottish form of Elizabeth.
Eòghann m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Eoghan.
Eòin m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Iohannes (see John) used in the Bible.
Euan m Scottish
Anglicized form of Eòghann.
Evander 2 m Scottish
Anglicized form of Iomhar.
Ewan m Scottish
Anglicized form of Eòghann.
Ewen m Scottish
Anglicized form of Eòghann.
Farquhar m Scottish
Anglicized form of Fearchar.
Fearchar m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of the Old Irish name Ferchar, from fer "man" and carae "friend". This was the name of early kings of Dál Riata (sometimes as Ferchar).
Fearghas m Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Fergus.
Fenella f Scottish
Form of Fionnuala used by Walter Scott for a character in his novel Peveril of the Peak (1823).
Fergie m Scottish
Diminutive form of Fergus.
Fergus m Irish, Scottish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "man of vigour", derived from the Old Irish elements fer "man" and guss "vigour, strength, force". This was the name of several early rulers of Ireland and Dál Riata, as well as many characters from Irish legend. Notably it was borne by the hero Fergus mac Róich, who was tricked into giving up the kingship of Ulster to Conchobar. However, he remained loyal to the new king until Conchobar betrayed Deirdre and Naoise, at which point he defected to Connacht in anger. The name was also borne by an 8th-century saint, a missionary to Scotland.... [more]
Fife m Scottish (Rare)
From a Scottish place name that was formerly the name of a kingdom in Scotland. It is said to be named for a Pictish kingdom called Fib.
Filib m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Philip.
Findlay m Scottish
Anglicized form of Fionnlagh.
Finella f Scottish
Variant of Fenella.
Finlay m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Fionnlagh. This spelling is more common in Scotland, though in England and Wales the variant Finley has been more popular since 2007.
Fiona f Scottish, English
Feminine form of Fionn. This name was (first?) used by the Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem Fingal (1761), in which it is spelled as Fióna.
Fionnghal f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Fionnuala. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Flora.
Fionnlagh m Scottish Gaelic
Means "white warrior", derived from Old Irish finn "white, fair" and láech "warrior". An earlier form was Findláech — this was the name of the father of the 11th-century Scottish king Macbeth.
Forbes m Scottish
From a Scottish surname that was originally taken from the name of a village in Aberdeenshire, which means "field, area of land" in Gaelic.
Frang m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Francis.
Frangag f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic feminine form of Francis.
Fraser m Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname, originally Norman French de Fresel, possibly from a lost place name in France.
Gavin m English, Scottish
Medieval form of Gawain. Though it died out in England, it was reintroduced from Scotland in the 20th century.
Gilchrist m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of the medieval Gaelic name Gille Críst, or from the surname that was derived from it.
Gilleasbuig m Scottish Gaelic
Means "servant of the bishop", from Scottish Gaelic gille "servant" and easbuig "bishop", from Greek ἐπίσκοπος (episkopos). It was often Anglicized as Gillespie or Archibald (with which it has no obvious connection).
Goraidh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Godfrey.
Gordon m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from a place in Berwickshire, itself derived from Brythonic elements meaning "spacious fort". It was originally used in honour of Charles George Gordon (1833-1885), a British general who died defending the city of Khartoum in Sudan.... [more]
Graeme m Scottish, English
From a surname that was a variant of Graham. This particular spelling for the given name has been most common in Scotland, New Zealand and Australia.
Graham m Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname, originally derived from the English place name Grantham, which probably meant "gravelly homestead" in Old English. The surname was first taken to Scotland in the 12th century by the Norman baron William de Graham. A famous bearer of the surname was Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor who devised the telephone. A famous bearer of the given name was the British author Graham Greene (1904-1991).... [more]
Grahame m Scottish, English
From a surname that was a variant of Graham.
Grant m English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname that was derived from Norman French grand meaning "great, large". A famous bearer of the surname was Ulysses Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War who later served as president. In America the name has often been given in his honour.
Gregor m German, Scottish, Slovak, Slovene
German, Scottish, Slovak and Slovene form of Gregorius (see Gregory). A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
Greig m Scottish
Short form of Gregory.
Griogair m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Gregory.
Grizel f Scots
Scots form of Griselda.
Hamish m Scottish
Anglicized form of a Sheumais, the vocative case of Seumas.
Heck m Scottish
Scottish short form of Hector.
Heckie m Scottish
Scottish diminutive of Hector.
Hendry m Scots
Scots form of Henry.
Iagan m Scottish Gaelic
Possibly a regional (Hebridean) diminutive of Iain.
Iain m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Iohannes (see John).
Ian m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Iain, itself from Latin Iohannes (see John). It became popular in the United Kingdom outside of Scotland in the first half of the 20th century, but did not begin catching on in America until the 1960s.
Innes m Scottish
Anglicized form of Aonghas.
Iomhar m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ivor.
Iona 1 f English, Scottish
From the name of the island off Scotland where Saint Columba founded a monastery. The name of the island is Old Norse in origin, and apparently derives simply from ey meaning "island".
Irvine m English, Scottish
From a surname that was a variant of Irving.
Iseabail f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Isabel.
Ishbel f Scottish
Anglicized form of Iseabail.
Isla f Scottish, English
Variant of Islay, typically used as a feminine name. It also coincides with the Spanish word isla meaning "island".
Islay f & m Scottish
From the name of the island of Islay, which lies off of the west coast of Scotland.
Isobel f Scottish
Anglicized form of Iseabail.
Ivor m Irish, Scottish, Welsh, English (British)
From the Old Norse name Ívarr, which was derived from the elements yr "yew, bow" and arr "warrior". During the Middle Ages it was brought to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders, and it was adopted in Ireland (Irish Íomhar), Scotland (Scottish Gaelic Iomhar) and Wales (Welsh Ifor).
Jamesina f Scottish
Feminine form of James.
Jamie m & f Scottish, English
Originally a Lowland Scots diminutive of James. Since the late 19th century it has also been used as a feminine form.
Jean 2 f English, Scottish
Medieval English variant of Jehanne (see Jane). It was common in England and Scotland during the Middle Ages, but eventually became rare in England. It was reintroduced to the English-speaking world from Scotland in the 19th century.
Jessie 1 f Scottish, English
Originally a Scots diminutive of Jean 2. In modern times it is also used as a diminutive of Jessica.
Jock m Scottish
Scots form of Jack. Among the English, this is a slang term for a Scotsman.
Jockie m Scottish
Scots diminutive of Jack.
Jocky m Scottish
Scots diminutive of Jack.
Katrina f Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Caitrìona.
Keir m Scottish
From a surname that was a variant of Kerr.
Keith m English, Scottish
From a Scottish surname that was originally derived from the name of a place in East Lothian, itself possibly derived from the Celtic root *kayto- meaning "wood". This was the surname of a long line of Scottish nobles. It has been used as a given name since the 19th century, becoming fairly common throughout the English-speaking world in the 20th century.
Kenina f Scottish
Feminine form of Kenneth.
Kenna f Scottish
Feminine form of Kenneth.
Kenneth m Scottish, English, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian
Anglicized form of both Coinneach and Cináed. This name was borne by the Scottish king Kenneth (Cináed) mac Alpin, who united the Scots and Picts in the 9th century. It was popularized outside of Scotland by Walter Scott, who used it for the hero in his 1825 novel The Talisman. A famous bearer was the British novelist Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932), who wrote The Wind in the Willows.
Kenny m Scottish, English
Diminutive of Kenneth.
Kerr m Scottish
From a Scots surname that was derived from a word meaning "thicket, marsh", ultimately from Old Norse kjarr.
Kirsteen f Scottish
Scottish form of Christina.
Kirstie f Scottish
Diminutive of Kirsteen or Kirstin.
Kirstin f Scottish
Scottish form of Christina.
Kirsty f Scottish
Diminutive of Kirsteen or Kirstin.
Labhrann m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Laurence 1.
Lachie m Scottish
Diminutive of Lachlan.
Lachlan m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Lachlann, the Scottish Gaelic form of Lochlainn. In the English-speaking world, this name was especially popular in Australia towards the end of the 20th century.
Lachlann m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Lochlainn.
Lileas f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic of Lillian.
Lilias f Scottish
Form of Lillian found in Scotland from about the 16th century.
Lillias f Scottish
Variant of Lilias.
Liùsaidh f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Lucia or Louisa.
Maighread f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Margaret.
Mairead f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Margaret.
Màiri f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Maria (see Mary). The form Moire is used to refer to the Virgin Mary.
Maisie f Scottish, English
Scottish diminutive of Mairead. It was long used in the United Kingdom and Australia, becoming popular at the end of the 20th century. In the United States it was brought to public attention by the British actress Maisie Williams (1997-), who played Arya Stark on the television series Game of Thrones beginning 2011. Her birth name is Margaret.
Malcolm m Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Máel Coluim, which means "disciple of Saint Columba". This was the name of four kings of Scotland starting in the 10th century, including Malcolm III, who became king after killing Macbeth, the usurper who had murdered his father. The character Malcolm in Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth (1606) is based on him. Another famous bearer was Malcolm X (1925-1965), an American civil rights leader.
Malina 1 f Scottish
Feminine form of Malcolm.
Maoilios m Scottish Gaelic
Means "servant of Jesus" in Scottish Gaelic.
Maol Chaluim m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Malcolm.
Marcas m Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Marcus (see Mark).
Marsaili f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Marcella, now also associated with Marjorie.
Mhairi f Scottish
Anglicized form of a Mhàiri, the vocative case of Màiri.
Mìcheal m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Michael.
Mìcheil m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic variant of Mìcheal.
Moira f Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Máire. It also coincides with Greek Μοῖρα (Moira) meaning "fate, destiny", the singular of Μοῖραι, the Greek name for the Fates. They were the three female personifications of destiny in Greek mythology.
Moire f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Maria (see Mary), typically only used to refer to the Virgin Mary. The form Màiri is used as a given name.
Mòr f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Mór 1. It is sometimes translated into English as Sarah or Marion.
Mòrag f Scottish Gaelic
Diminutive of Mòr.
Moray m Scottish
From the name of the area of Moray in Scotland or the surname derived from it (see Moray).
Morna f Scottish
Anglicized form of Muirne used by James Macpherson in his poem Fingal (1761), in which it is borne by the mother of the hero Fingal.
Morven f Scottish
From the name of a region in western Scotland, also called Morvern or in Gaelic A' Mhorbhairne, meaning "the big gap". This is the location of Fingal's kingdom in James Macpherson's 18th-century poems.
Moyra f Irish, Scottish
Variant of Moira.
Muir m Scottish
From a Scottish surname, derived from Scots muir meaning "moor, fen". This name could also be inspired by Scottish Gaelic muir meaning "sea".
Muireadhach m Medieval Irish, Scottish Gaelic
From Old Irish Muiredach meaning "lord, master". This was the name of several legendary and historical kings of Ireland.
Muireall f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Muirgel.
Mungo m Scottish
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a Brythonic phrase meaning "my dear". This was a nickname of the 6th-century Saint Kentigern.
Murchadh m Medieval Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Means "sea battle", derived from Old Irish muir "sea" and cath "battle". This name was borne by several medieval Irish chieftains and kings. It is Anglicized as Murdo in Scotland.
Murdag f Scottish Gaelic
Feminine form of Murdo.
Murdo m Scottish
Anglicized form of Murchadh.
Murdoch m Scottish
Anglicized form of Muireadhach.
Muriel f English, French, Irish, Scottish, Medieval Breton (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Irish Muirgel and Scottish Muireall. A form of this name was also used in Brittany, and it was first introduced to medieval England by Breton settlers in the wake of the Norman Conquest. In the modern era it was popularized by a character from Dinah Craik's novel John Halifax, Gentleman (1856).
Murray m Scottish, English
From a surname, which is either Scottish or Irish in origin (see Murray 1 and Murray 2).
Nandag f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic diminutive of Anna.
Neacel m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Nicholas.
Neil m Irish, Scottish, English
From the Irish name Niall, which is of disputed origin, possibly connected to the old Celtic root *nītu- "fury, passion" or the (possibly related) Old Irish word nia "hero". A derivation from Old Irish nél "cloud" has also been suggested. This was the name of a few early Irish kings, notably Niall of the Nine Hostages, a semi-legendary high king of the 4th or 5th century.... [more]
Neilina f Scottish
Feminine form of Neil.
Nicol 1 m Medieval English, Scottish
Medieval English and Scottish form of Nicholas. This was the middle name of a character in the novel Rob Roy (1817) by Walter Scott.
Ninian m Scottish
From the name of a 5th-century British saint, known as the Apostle to the Picts, who was apparently responsible for many miracles and cures. He first appears briefly in the 8th-century Latin writings of the historian Bede, though his name is only written in the ablative case Nynia. This may represent a Brythonic name *Ninniau.
Niven m Scottish
Anglicized form of Naomhán.
Oighrig f Scottish Gaelic
From the older Gaelic name Aithbhreac, derived from the intensive prefix ath- and breac "speckled". It has been Anglicized as Effie, Euphemia and Affrica.
Pàdraig m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Patrick.
Pàl m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Paul.
Peadar m Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Peter.
Peigi f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Peggy.
Pòl m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Paul.
Rab m Scots
Scots short form of Robert.
Rabbie m Scots
Scots diminutive of Robert. This is the familar name of the Scottish poet Robert Burns (1759-1796).
Raghnaid f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ragnhild.
Raghnall m Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Irish and Scottish Gaelic form of Ragnvaldr.
Raibeart m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Robert.
Ramsay m Scottish
From a surname that was a variant of Ramsey.
Ranald m Scottish
Anglicized form of Raghnall.
Rhona f Scottish
Possibly derived from the name of either of the two Hebridean islands called Rona, which means "rough island" in Old Norse.
Roddy m English, Scottish
Diminutive of Roderick or Rodney.
Roderick m English, Scottish, Welsh
Means "famous ruler" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ric "ruler, mighty". This name was in use among the Visigoths; it was borne by their last king (also known as Rodrigo), who died fighting the Muslim invaders of Spain in the 8th century. It also had cognates in Old Norse and West Germanic, and Scandinavian settlers and Normans introduced it to England, though it died out after the Middle Ages. It was revived in the English-speaking world by Walter Scott's 1811 poem The Vision of Don Roderick.... [more]
Rodina f Scottish
Scottish feminine form of Roderick.
Ronald m Scottish, English, Dutch, German
Scottish form of Ragnvaldr, a name introduced to Britain by Scandinavian settlers and invaders. It became popular outside Scotland during the 20th century. A famous bearer was the American actor and president Ronald Reagan (1911-2004). It is also associated with Ronald McDonald, the clown mascot for the McDonald's chain of restaurants, first appearing in 1963.
Ronalda f Scottish
Feminine form of Ronald.
Rory m & f Irish, Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Ruaidhrí. Typically a masculine name, it gained some popularity for girls in the United States after it was used on the television series Gilmore Girls (2000-2007), in this case as a nickname for Lorelai. Despite this, the name has grown more common for boys in America, especially after 2011, perhaps due to Northern Irish golfer Rory McIlroy (1989-).
Ross m Scottish, English
From a Scottish and English surname that originally indicated a person from a place called Ross (such as the region of Ross in northern Scotland), derived from Gaelic ros meaning "promontory, headland". A famous bearer of the surname was Sir James Clark Ross (1800-1862), an Antarctic explorer.
Roy m Scottish, English, Dutch
Anglicized form of Ruadh. A notable bearer was the Scottish outlaw and folk hero Rob Roy (1671-1734). It is often associated with French roi "king".
Ruairi m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ruaidhrí.
Ruairidh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ruaidhrí.
Ruaraidh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ruaidhrí.
Ruaridh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Ruaidhrí.
Sachairi m Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Scottish Gaelic form of Zechariah.
Sawney m Scots
Scots diminutive of Alexander.
Scot m English, Scottish
Variant form of Scott.
Scott m English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname that referred to a person from Scotland or a person who spoke Scottish Gaelic. It is derived from Latin Scoti meaning "Gael, Gaelic speaker", with the ultimate origin uncertain.
Seaghdh m Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Scottish Gaelic form of Séaghdha.
Senga f Scottish
Sometimes explained as an anagram of Agnes, but more likely derived from Gaelic seang "slender".
Seoc m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Jack.
Seona f Scottish
Partially Anglicized form of Seònaid or Seonag.
Seonag f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Joan 1.
Seònaid f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Janet.
Seòras m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of George.
Seòsaidh m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Josey.
Seumas m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of James.
Sheena f Scottish, English
Anglicized form of Sìne. This name was popularized outside of Scotland in the 1980s by the singer Sheena Easton (1959-).
Sheenagh f Scottish
Variant of Sheena.
Sheona f Scottish
Variant of Shona.
Sholto m Scottish
Probably an Anglicized form of Gaelic sìoltaich meaning "sower, propagator". It has occasionally been used in the Douglas family since the 17th century, after David Hume of Godscroft claimed it was the name of the 7th-century founder of the clan.
Shona f Scottish
Anglicized form of Seonag or Seònaid. Though unconnected, this is also the name of an ethnic group who live in southern Africa, mainly Zimbabwe.
Shug m Scots
Scots diminutive of Hugh.
Sìleas f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Cecilia.
Sìne f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Jeanne or Jane.
Sìneag f Scottish Gaelic
Diminutive of Sìne.
Slàine f Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Scottish Gaelic form of Sláine.
Somhairle m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Sumarliði (see Somerled).
Sorcha f Irish, Scottish Gaelic
Means "radiant, bright" in Irish. It has been in use since late medieval times. It is sometimes Anglicized as Sarah (in Ireland) and Clara (in Scotland).
Sorley m Scottish
Anglicized form of Somhairle.
Steaphan m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Stephen.
Steenie m Scots
Scots diminutive of Stephen.
Stewart m English, Scottish
From a surname that was a variant Stuart.
Stuart m English, Scottish
From a Scottish occupational surname originally belonging to a person who was a steward. It is ultimately derived from Old English stig "house" and weard "guard". As a given name, it arose in 19th-century Scotland in honour of the Stuart royal family, which produced several kings and queens of Scotland and Britain between the 14th and 18th centuries.
Tam 1 m Scottish
Scots short form of Thomas.
Tàmhas m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Thomas.
Tasgall m Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Variant of Asgall, Scottish Gaelic form of Ásketill. It is used by the MacAskill family of the Hebrides.
Taskill m Scottish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Tasgall.
Tavish m Scottish
Anglicized form of a Thàmhais, vocative case of Tàmhas. Alternatively it could be taken from the Scottish surname McTavish, Anglicized form of Mac Tàmhais, meaning "son of Tàmhas".
Teàrlach m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Toirdhealbhach. It is sometimes Anglicized as Charles.
Teàrlag f Scottish Gaelic
Feminine form of Teàrlach. It is sometimes Anglicized as Charlotte.
Teasag f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Jessie 1.
Tòmas m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Thomas.
Torcall m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of the Norse name Þórketill (see Torkel).
Torquil m Scottish
Anglicized form of Torcall.
Ualan m Scottish Gaelic (Rare)
Scottish Gaelic form of Valentine 1.
Uilleam m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of William.
Ùisdean m Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of the Old Norse name Eysteinn.
Ùna f Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic form of Úna.
Wallace m English, Scottish
From a Scottish and English surname that was derived from Norman French waleis meaning "foreigner, Celt, Welshman" (of Germanic origin). It was first used as a given name in honour of Sir William Wallace, a Scottish hero who led the fight against the English in the 13th century.