Estonian Names

Estonian names are used in the country of Estonia in northern Europe.
gender
usage
AARNE m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of ARNE (1).
AGE (2) f Estonian
Estonian form of AGNES.
AGNES f English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Ἁγνή (Hagne), derived from Greek ἁγνός (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe.... [more]
AHTI m Finnish, Estonian, Finnish Mythology
Meaning unknown. This is the name of the Finnish god of the ocean, rivers and fishing.
AIN m Estonian
Possibly an Estonian short form of HENDRIK.
AINO f Finnish, Estonian, Finnish Mythology
Means "the only one" in Finnish. In the Finnish epic the Kalevala this is the name of a girl who drowns herself when she finds out she must marry the old man Väinämöinen.
AIVAR m Estonian
Estonian form of IVAR.
ALEKSANDER m Polish, Slovene, Estonian, Norwegian, Danish
Form of ALEXANDER in several languages.
ALLAN m English, Scottish, Danish, Swedish, Estonian
Variant of ALAN. The American author Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) got his middle name from the surname of the parents who adopted him.
ALVAR m Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and arr "warrior".
ANDRA (1) f Latvian, Estonian
Feminine form of ANDREJS (Latvian) or ANDRES (Estonian).
ANDRES m Estonian
Estonian form of ANDREW.
ANDRUS m Estonian
Estonian form of ANDREW.
ANNA f English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.... [more]
ANNE (1) f French, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, German, Dutch, Basque
French form of ANNA. It was imported to England in the 13th century, but it did not become popular until three centuries later. The spelling variant Ann was also commonly found from this period, and is still used to this day.... [more]
ANNELI f Finnish, Estonian, Swedish, German
Finnish, Estonian and Swedish form of ANNELIE, as well as a German variant.
ANTI m Estonian
Estonian form of ANDREW.
ANTS m Estonian
Estonian form of HANS.
ANU (1) f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian diminutive of ANNA.
ARVO m Finnish, Estonian
Means "value, worth" in Finnish and Estonian.
AVE f Estonian
Possibly from the name of the prayer Ave Maria, in which Ave is Latin meaning "greetings, salutations".
BIRGIT f Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Scandinavian variant of BIRGITTA.
DIANA f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, German, Dutch, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Roman Mythology
Probably derived from an old Indo-European root meaning "heavenly, divine", related to dyeus (see ZEUS). Diana was a Roman goddess of the moon, hunting, forests, and childbirth, often identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.... [more]
EDVIN m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Scandinavian, Finnish, Estonian and Hungarian form of EDWIN.
EERIK m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of ERIC.
EERO m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of ERIC. A famous bearer was the architect Eero Saarinen (1910-1961).
EEVA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of EVA.
EEVI f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of EVA.
EHA f Estonian
Means "dusk" in Estonian.
EINAR m Norwegian, Icelandic, Swedish, Danish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Einarr, derived from the elements ein "one, alone" and arr "warrior". This name shares the same roots as einherjar, the word for the slain warriors in Valhalla.
ELENA f Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Slovak, Lithuanian, Estonian, Russian, Greek, German, English, Medieval Slavic
Form of HELEN used in various languages, as well as an alternate transcription of Russian Елена (see YELENA).
ELIISABET f Estonian
Estonian form of ELIZABETH.
ELINA f Finnish, Estonian, Swedish
Finnish, Estonian and Swedish form of HELEN.
ELO f Estonian
Short form of names beginning with El, such as ELIISABET. It could also be from Estonian elu meaning "life".
ELVIIRA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of ELVIRA.
ENDEL m Estonian
Masculine form of ENDLA.
ENDLA f Estonian
From the name of an Estonian lake, which often appears in folk poetry. The lake's name is ultimately derived from the medieval personal name Ent or Endo.
ENE f Estonian
Possibly a form of ANU (1), ANNE (1) or HENRIKA.
ENN m Estonian
Estonian short form of HENDRIK.
ERIK m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, German, Dutch, English
Scandinavian form of ERIC. This was the name of kings of Sweden, Denmark and Norway. King Erik IX of Sweden (12th century) is the patron saint of that country.
ERIKA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, German, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, English, Italian
Feminine form of ERIK. It also coincides with the word for "heather" in some languages.
EVA f Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, English, Czech, Slovak, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, Danish, Icelandic, Faroese, Greek, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin
Form of EVE used in various languages. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. The name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.... [more]
EVELIN f German, Estonian, Hungarian
German, Estonian and Hungarian form of EVELINA.
GEORG m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian
Form of GEORGE in several languages. This name was borne by the German idealist philosopher Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770-1831).
HEIKI m Estonian
Estonian form of Heinrich (see HENRY).
HEINO m German, Dutch, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German form of Haimo (see HAMO).
HELEN f English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
English form of the Greek Ἑλένη (Helene), probably from Greek ἑλένη (helene) meaning "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σελήνη (selene) meaning "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.... [more]
HELVE f Estonian
Means "flake, snowflake" in Estonian.
HENDRIK m Dutch, German, Estonian
Dutch and Estonian cognate of Heinrich (see HENRY).
HILJA f Finnish, Estonian
Means "silent, quiet" in Finnish and Estonian (a rare poetic word).
HILLAR m Estonian
Estonian form of HILARIUS.
ILJA m Czech, Estonian, Lithuanian, Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Илья (see ILYA), as well as the usual form in several other languages.
ILMAR m Estonian
Estonian form of ILMARINEN.
ILME f Estonian
Estonian form of ILMA (1).
ILONA f Hungarian, German, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech
Meaning uncertain, possibly a Hungarian form of HELEN. In Finland it is associated with the word ilona, a derivative of ilo "joy".
IMBI f Estonian
Estonian cognate of IMPI.
INDREK m Estonian
Estonian form of Heinrich (see HENRY).
INGE f & m Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch, Estonian
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god ING. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
INGRID f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).
IVAR m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian
Scandinavian form of IVOR.
JAAGUP m Estonian
Estonian form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAAK m Estonian, Flemish
Estonian form of JACOB or JAMES, and a Flemish short form of JACOB.
JAAKOB m Finnish (Rare), Estonian (Rare)
Finnish and Estonian form of JACOB (or JAMES).
JAAN m Estonian
Estonian form of JOHN.
JAANA (2) f Estonian
Feminine form of JAAN.
JANEK m Estonian, Polish, Czech
Estonian, Polish and Czech diminutive of JAAN or JAN (1).
JANIKA f Estonian, Finnish
Feminine form of JAAN (Estonian) or JANI (Finnish).
JANNE (2) f Danish, Norwegian, Estonian
Danish, Norwegian and Estonian diminutive of JOHANNE or JOHANNA.
JELENA f Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Estonian, Lithuanian
Form of YELENA in several languages. In Serbia, Croatia and Slovenia it is also associated with the South Slavic words jelen meaning "deer, stag" and jela meaning "fir tree".
JOHANNA f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Hungarian, Finnish, Estonian, English, Late Roman
Latinate form of Greek Ioanna (see JOANNA).
JOHANNES m German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Late Roman
Latin form of Greek Ioannes (see JOHN). Notable bearers include the inventor of the printing press Johannes Gutenberg (1398-1468), astronomer Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) and composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
JOONAS m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of JONAS (2).
JOOSEP m Estonian
Estonian form of JOSEPH.
JUHAN m Estonian
Estonian form of Iohannes (see JOHN).
JÜRI m Estonian
Estonian form of GEORGE.
JUTA f Estonian, Latvian
Estonian and Latvian form of JUTTA. This is the name of a character in the Estonian legend Lake Endla and Juta (1852) by Friedrich Robert Faehlmann.
KAAREL m Estonian
Estonian form of CHARLES.
KADI f Estonian
Short form of KATARIINA.
KADRI f Estonian
Estonian form of KATHERINE.
KAI (2) f Estonian
Short form of KAIA.
KAIDI f Estonian
Short form of KATARIINA.
KAISA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian diminutive of KATHERINE.
KAJA (1) f Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, Estonian, Slovene
Scandinavian diminutive of KATARINA.
KAJA (3) f Estonian
Means "echo" in Estonian.
KALEV (1) m Estonian
Estonian form of KALEVA. This was the name of a hero in Estonian mythology.
KALJU m Estonian
Means "rock, boulder" in Estonian.
KALLE m Swedish, Finnish, Estonian
Swedish diminutive of KARL. It is used in Finland and Estonia as a full name.
KARL m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Estonian, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of CHARLES. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
KARMEN f Slovene, Croatian, Estonian
Slovene, Croatian and Estonian form of CARMEN.
KAROLIINA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian feminine form of CAROLUS.
KÄRT f Estonian
Short form of KERTU.
KASPAR m German, Estonian
German and Estonian form of JASPER.
KATARIINA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of KATHERINE.
KATI f Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian
Finnish and Estonian diminutive of KATARIINA and a Hungarian diminutive of KATALIN.
KATRIN f German, Swedish, Estonian
German, Swedish and Estonian short form of KATHERINE.
KERTU f Estonian
Estonian form of GERTRUDE.
KOIT m Estonian
Means "dawn" in Estonian.
KRISTI f English, Estonian
Diminutive of CHRISTINA or CHRISTINE (English) or KRISTIINA (Estonian).
KRISTIINA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of CHRISTINA.
KRISTINA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, German, Slovene, Czech, Lithuanian, Serbian, Croatian, Faroese, English, Bulgarian
Form of CHRISTINA in several languages. It is also an English variant of CHRISTINA and a Bulgarian variant of HRISTINA.
KRISTJAN m Estonian, Slovene
Estonian and Slovene form of CHRISTIAN.
KRISTO m Albanian, Estonian
Short form of KRISTOFOR (Albanian) or KRISTJAN (Estonian). Saint Kristo the Gardiner (also called Christos) was an Albanian martyred in Constantinople in 1748.
KÜLLI f Estonian
Originally a short form of KÜLLIKI, now used independently.
KÜLLIKE f Estonian
Estonian form of KYLLIKKI.
KÜLLIKI f Estonian
Estonian form of KYLLIKKI.
LAGLE f Estonian
Means "goose" in Estonian.
LAINE f Estonian
Means "wave" in Estonian.
LAURA f English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Catalan, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.... [more]
LAURI m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of Laurentius (see LAURENCE (1)).
LEELO f Estonian
Means "folk song" in Estonian.
LEENA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian short form of HELENA or MATLEENA.
LEIDA f Estonian
Meaning unknown. It was popularized by a character in Estonian writer Andres Saal's historical stories Vambola (1889) and Aita (1891). Saal associated it with Estonian leidma "to find".
LEILI f Estonian
Probably from LAILA (2), but also associated with Estonian leil meaning "vapour, steam". It became popular due to Andres Saal's novel Leili (1892).
LIIDIA f Estonian
Estonian form of LYDIA.
LIINA f Estonian, Finnish
Short form of KAROLIINA.
LIIS f Estonian
Estonian short form of ELIISABET.
LIISA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian short form of ELISABET or ELIISABET.
LIISI f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian diminutive of ELISABET or ELIISABET.
LIISU f Estonian
Estonian diminutive of ELIISABET.
LINDA f English, German, Dutch, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, French, Latvian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Czech, Slovak, Ancient Germanic
Originally a medieval short form of Germanic names containing the element lind meaning "flexible, soft, mild". It also coincides with the Spanish and Portuguese word linda meaning "beautiful". In the English-speaking world this name experienced a spike in popularity beginning in the 1930s, peaking in the late 1940s, and declining shortly after that. It was the most popular name for girls in the United States from 1947 to 1952.
LOVIISE f Estonian
Estonian feminine form of LOUIS.
LUULE f Estonian
Means "poetry" in Estonian.
MAARIKA f Estonian, Finnish
Diminutive of MAARJA (Estonian) or MAARIA (Finnish).
MAARJA f Estonian
Estonian form of MARIA.
MADIS m Estonian
Short form of MATTIAS.
MAI (3) f Estonian, Norwegian, Danish
Diminutive of MARIA. This is also the Estonian and Norwegian name for the month of May.
MAIA (3) f Estonian, Basque
Estonian and Basque form of MARIA.
MAIE f Estonian
Variant of MAIA (3).
MAIMU f Estonian
Means "little" in Estonian. This is the name of a girl in the story Maimu (1889) by the Estonian writer August Kitzberg.
MAIRE f Finnish, Estonian
Derived from Finnish mairea meaning "gushing, sugary".
MALLE f Estonian, Medieval English
Estonian diminutive of MARIA or MAARJA, now used independently. This was also a medieval English diminutive of MARY.
MARE f Estonian, Slovene, Macedonian, Croatian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with Mar.
MAREK m Polish, Czech, Slovak, Estonian
Polish, Czech and Slovak form of MARK.
MARET f Estonian
Estonian form of MARGARET.
MARGAREETA f Finnish (Rare), Estonian (Rare)
Finnish and Estonian variant form of MARGARET.
MARGE f English, Estonian
Diminutive of MARGARET (English) or MARGAREETA (Estonian).
MARGIT f Hungarian, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Estonian, German
Hungarian and Scandinavian form of MARGARET.
MARGUS m Estonian
Estonian form of Marcus (see MARK).
MARI (1) f Welsh, Breton, Estonian, Finnish, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Welsh, Breton, Estonian and Finnish form of MARIA, as well as a Hungarian diminutive of MÁRIA. It is also a Scandinavian form of MARIE.
MARIA f & m Italian, Portuguese, Catalan, Occitan, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Faroese, Dutch, Frisian, Greek, Polish, Romanian, English, Finnish, Estonian, Corsican, Sardinian, Basque, Russian, Bulgarian, Ukrainian, Biblical Greek, Biblical Latin, Old Church Slavic
Latin form of Greek Μαρία, from Hebrew מִרְיָם (see MARY). Maria is the usual form of the name in many European languages, as well as a secondary form in other languages such as English (where the common spelling is Mary). In some countries, for example Germany, Poland and Italy, Maria is occasionally used as a masculine middle name.... [more]
MARIKA f Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Greek, Finnish, Estonian, Swedish, Georgian, Italian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with Mari.
MARJE (2) f Estonian, Finnish
Variant of MAARJA (Estonian) or MARJA (Finnish).
MARJU f Estonian
Estonian variant of MAARJA.
MARKUS m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian
German, Scandinavian, Finnish and Estonian form of Marcus (see MARK).
MART m Estonian, Dutch
Short form of MARTIN.
MARTIN m English, French, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Russian, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Finnish
From the Roman name Martinus, which was derived from Martis, the genitive case of the name of the Roman god MARS. Saint Martin of Tours was a 4th-century bishop who is the patron saint of France. According to legend, he came across a cold beggar in the middle of winter so he ripped his cloak in two and gave half of it to the beggar. He was a favourite saint during the Middle Ages, and his name has become common throughout the Christian world.... [more]
MATI m Estonian
Estonian form of MATTHEW.
MATTIAS m Swedish, Estonian
Swedish and Estonian form of MATTHIAS.
MEELI f Estonian
Feminine form of MEELIS.
MEELIS m Estonian
From Estonian meel meaning "mind, mood".
MERIKE f Estonian
From Estonian meri "sea" with a diminutive suffix.
MERIT (2) f Estonian, Swedish (Rare)
Variant of MARET (Estonian) or MARIT (Swedish).
MIHKEL m Estonian
Estonian form of MICHAEL.
MILVI f Estonian
Coined by Estonian writer Mats Tõnisson in 1914, of uncertain meaning.
MIRJAM f Dutch, German, Finnish, Estonian, Slovene
Form of MIRIAM in several languages.
MOONIKA f Estonian
Estonian form of MONIKA.
NELE f German, Dutch, Estonian
Diminutive of CORNELIA.
NIGUL m Estonian
Estonian form of NICHOLAS.
ÕIE f Estonian
Derived from Estonian õis meaning "flower".
OLAVI m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of OLAF.
OLEV m Estonian
Estonian form of OLAF.
OLGA f Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Icelandic, Estonian, Latvian, Hungarian, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovene, Serbian, Bulgarian, Greek
Russian form of HELGA. The Varangians brought it from Scandinavia to Russia. The 10th-century Saint Olga was the wife of Igor I, grand prince of Kievan Rus (a state based around the city of Kiev). Following his death she ruled as regent for her son for 18 years. After she was baptized in Constantinople she attempted to convert her subjects to Christianity.
OLIVER m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Olivier, a Norman French form of a Germanic name such as ALFHER or an Old Norse name such as Áleifr (see OLAF). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
OTT m Estonian
Possibly an Estonian form of OTTO. It may also be inspired by an archaic Estonian word meaning "bear".
PAAVO m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of PAUL.
PAUL m English, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Romanian, Biblical
From the Roman family name Paulus, which meant "small" or "humble" in Latin. Paul was an important leader of the early Christian church. According to Acts in the New Testament, he was a Jewish Roman citizen who converted to Christianity after the resurrected Jesus appeared to him. After this he travelled the eastern Mediterranean as a missionary. His original Hebrew name was Saul. Many of the epistles in the New Testament were authored by him.... [more]
PEETER m Estonian
Estonian form of PETER.
PIIA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of PIA.
PILLE f Estonian
Possibly an 18th-century Estonian derivative of the German name SIBYLLE.
PILVI f Finnish, Estonian
Means "cloud" in Finnish and Estonian.
PIRET f Estonian
Estonian form of BIRGITTA.
PRIIDIK m Estonian
Estonian form of FREDERICK.
PRIIT m Estonian
Short form of PRIIDIK.
RAGNAR m Swedish, Norwegian, Icelandic, Estonian
Scandinavian cognate of RAYNER.
RAIMOND m Estonian
Estonian form of RAYMOND.
RAIN (2) m Estonian
Variant of REIN.
RAIVO m Estonian
Possibly a diminutive of RAIMOND. It could also be related to the Old Estonian word raivo meaning "fury, rage".
RASMUS m Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Finnish, Estonian
Scandinavian, Finnish and Estonian form of ERASMUS.
REET f Estonian
Estonian short form of MARGAREETA, used independently.
REGINA f English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Estonian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
REIN m Frisian, Dutch, Estonian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element ragin "advice, counsel".
RIIN f Estonian
Short form of KATARIINA.
RIINA f Finnish, Estonian
Short form of KATARIINA.
RISTO m Finnish, Estonian, Macedonian, Serbian
Finnish, Estonian, Macedonian and Serbian short form of CHRISTOPHER.
RITA f Italian, English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Hungarian, Spanish, Portuguese, Latvian, Lithuanian
Short form of MARGHERITA and other names ending in rita. A famous bearer was American actress Rita Hayworth (1918-1987).
ROBERT m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Finnish, Estonian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Catalan, Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been consistently among the most common English names from the 13th to 20th century. In the United States it was the most popular name for boys between 1924 and 1939 (and again in 1953).... [more]
ROMAN m Russian, Polish, Czech, Slovak, Ukrainian, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian, German, English
From the Late Latin name Romanus meaning "Roman". This name was borne by several early saints.
RUTT f Estonian
Estonian form of RUTH (1).
RUUBEN m Finnish (Rare), Estonian (Rare)
Finnish and Estonian form of REUBEN.
SAIMA (2) f Finnish, Estonian
From Saimaa, the name of the largest lake in Finland. The etymology of the lake's name is unknown.
SALME f Estonian
From Estonian salm meaning "poem, verse". This name appears in the Estonian national epic Kalevipoeg (1857) by Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald.
SANDER m Dutch, Estonian, Danish, Norwegian
Dutch, Estonian, Danish and Norwegian short form of ALEXANDER.
SIGRID f Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
SIIM m Estonian
Estonian form of SIMON (1), originally a short form but now used independently.
SIIRI f Estonian, Finnish
Estonian and Finnish diminutive of SIGRID.
SILJA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian diminutive of CECILIA.
SIRJE f Estonian
Possibly from Estonian sinisirje meaning "blue-feathered", a word associated with a magical bird in the Estonian national epic Kalevipoeg (1857) by Friedrich Reinhold Kreutzwald. Apparently this name was suggested by the linguist Julius Mägiste in the 1920s. It was subsequently used in the 1945 opera Tasuleegid by Eugen Kapp.
SVEN m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, German, Dutch
From the Old Norse byname Sveinn meaning "boy". This was the name of kings of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.
TAAVET m Estonian
Estonian form of DAVID.
TAAVI m Estonian, Finnish
Estonian and Finnish form of DAVID.
TAIMI f Finnish, Estonian
From Finnish taimi meaning "sapling, young tree" or Estonian taim meaning "plant" (words from a common origin).
TAIMO m Estonian
From Estonian taim meaning "plant".
TANEL m Estonian
Estonian form of DANIEL.
TARMO m Estonian, Finnish
Means "vigour, energy, drive" in Estonian and Finnish.
TAUNO m Finnish, Estonian
Means "peaceful, modest" in Karelian Finnish.
TERJE (2) f Estonian
Estonian form of TERHI.
TIIA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian short form of DOROTHEA.
TIINA f Finnish, Estonian
Short form of KRISTIINA.
TIIT m Estonian
Originally a short form of TIIDRIK, now used independently.
TIITUS m Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of TITUS.
TIIU f Estonian
Estonian variant of TIIA, possibly in part from an archaic dialectal form of the word tihane "titmouse".
TIMO (1) m Finnish, Estonian, German, Dutch
Finnish, Estonian, German and Dutch short form of Timotheus (see TIMOTHY).
TOIVO m Finnish, Estonian
Means "hope" in Finnish.
TÕNIS m Estonian
Estonian form of ANTHONY.
TÕNU m Estonian
Short form of TÕNIS, now used independently.
TOOMAS m Estonian
Estonian form of THOMAS.
TRIIN f Estonian
Diminutive of KATARIINA.
TRIINU f Estonian
Diminutive of KATARIINA.
TUULE f Estonian (Rare)
Estonian variant of TUULI.
TUULI f Finnish, Estonian
Means "wind" in Finnish and Estonian.
ÜLLE f Estonian
Feminine form of ÜLO.
ÜLO m Estonian
From the Livonian name Ilo or Ylo meaning "joy", a name appearing in the 13th-century Livonian Chronicle of Henry. It is now associated with the Estonian word ülev meaning "noble".
UNO m Swedish, Estonian
Meaning uncertain. It is possibly from the Old Norse name UNI. It could also come from Latin unus "one".
URMAS m Estonian
Possibly from the dialectal Estonian word urm meaning "frost" or "catkin".
URVE f Estonian
From Estonian urb meaning "catkin".
VAIKE f Estonian
From Estonian vaikus meaning "silence, calm". This name was coined by Andres Saal for a character in his story Vambola (1889).
VALTER m Italian, Swedish, Slovene, Croatian, Estonian
Form of WALTER used in several languages.
VEERA f Finnish, Estonian
Finnish and Estonian form of VERA (1).
VEIKO m Estonian
Estonian form of VEIKKO.
VELLO m Estonian
From a diminutive form of the Estonian word veli meaning "brother".
VIKTORIA f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Estonian, Greek, Russian, Ukrainian, Bulgarian, Belarusian
German, Scandinavian and Greek variant of VICTORIA. It is also an alternate transcription of Russian/Bulgarian Виктория or Ukrainian Вікторія (see VIKTORIYA) or Belarusian Вікторыя (see VIKTORYIA).
VILJAR (1) m Estonian
Estonian masculine form of VILJA.
VILLEM m Estonian
Estonian form of WILLIAM.
VIRVE f Estonian, Finnish
From Estonian virves meaning "sprout, shoot" or virve meaning "ripple, shimmer".