Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keywords dark or black or shadow or night.
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ABITAL   f   Biblical
Means "my father is the night dew" in Hebrew. She is the fifth wife of David in the Old Testament.
ANISHA   f   Indian, Hindi
Means "nightless, sleepless" in Sanskrit.
ASRA   f   Arabic
Means "travel at night" in Arabic. It is related to Isra.
BIBIGUL   f   Kazakh
Means "nightingale" in Kazakh.
BLAKE   m   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English blæc "black" or blac "pale". A famous bearer of the surname was the poet and artist William Blake (1757-1827).
CATAHECASSA   m   Native American, Shawnee
Means "black hoof" in Shawnee. This was the name of a Shawnee warrior and chief of the 18th century.
CHARNA   f   Yiddish
From a Slavic word meaning "black".
CHAUSIKU   f   Eastern African, Swahili
Means "born at night" in Swahili.
CHERNOBOG   m   Slavic Mythology
Means "the black god" from Slavic cherno "black" and bogu "god". Chernobog was the Slavic god of darkness, evil and grief.
CIAR   m   Irish
Derived from Irish ciar meaning "black".
CIARDHA   m   Irish
Derived from Irish ciar "black".
COLBY   m   English
From a surname, originally from various English place names, derived from the Old Norse nickname Koli (meaning "coal, dark") and býr "town".
DONNDUBHÁN   m   Ancient Irish
Composed of the Gaelic element donn "brown" combined with dubh "dark" and a diminutive suffix.
DOUGAL   m   Scottish, Irish
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Dubhghall, which meant "dark stranger" from dubh "dark" and gall "stranger".
DOUGLAS   m   Scottish, English
Anglicized form of the Scottish surname Dubhghlas, meaning "dark river" from Gaelic dubh "dark" and glais "water, river". Douglas was originally a place name (for example, a tributary of the River Clyde), which then became a Scottish clan name (belonging to a powerful line of Scottish earls). It has been used as a given name since the 16th century.
DUBHÁN   m   Irish
Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" combined with a diminutive suffix.
DUBHSHLÁINE   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" and either slán "defiance" or Sláine, the Gaelic name of the River Slaney.
DUBHTHACH   m   Ancient Irish
Old Irish name derived from dubh "dark, black" in combination with a second element of unknown meaning.
DUFF   m   Scottish
Derived from Gaelic dubh meaning "dark".
DUNSTAN   m   English (Rare), Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements dunn "dark" and stan "stone". This name was borne by a 10th-century saint, the archbishop of Canterbury. It was occasionally used in the Middle Ages, though it died out after the 16th century. It was revived by the Tractarian movement in the 19th century.
FEARDORCHA   m   Irish
Means "dark man" from Gaelic fear "man" and dorcha "dark".
FERRER   m   Various
From a surname which meant "blacksmith" in Catalan. This name is often given in honour of Saint Vicente Ferrer, a 14th-century missionary who is the patron saint of builders.
GARNET (1)   f   English
From the English word garnet for the precious stone, the birthstone of January. The word is derived from Middle English gernet meaning "dark red".
GETHIN   m   Welsh
Means "dark-skinned, swarthy" in Welsh.
ISRA   f   Arabic
Means "nocturnal journey", derived from Arabic سرى (sara) "to travel at night".
ITZAL   m   Basque
Means "shadow" in Basque.
KALI   f & m   Hinduism, Bengali, Tamil
Means "the black one" in Sanskrit. The Hindu goddess Kali is the fierce destructive form of the wife of Shiva. She is usually depicted with black skin and four arms, holding a severed head and brandishing a sword. As a personal name, it is generally masculine in India.
KARA (2)   m   Turkish
Means "black, dark" in Turkish.
KRISHNA   m   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Gujarati, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
Means "black, dark" in Sanskrit. This is the name of a Hindu god believed to be an incarnation of the god Vishnu. He was the youngest of King Vasudeva's eight children, six of whom were killed by King Kamsa because of a prophecy that a child of Vasudeva would kill Kamsa. Krishna however was saved and he eventually killed the king as well as performing many other great feats. In some Hindu traditions, Krishna is regarded as the supreme deity. He is usually depicted with blue skin.
LAMYA   f   Arabic
Means "having beautiful dark lips" in Arabic.
LAYLA   f   Arabic, English
Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.
LI (1)   f & m   Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "reason, logic", () meaning "stand, establish", () meaning "black, dawn", () meaning "power, capability, influence" (which is usually only masculine) or () meaning "beautiful" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
LILITH   f   Near Eastern Mythology, Judeo-Christian Legend
Derived from Akkadian lilitu meaning "of the night". This was the name of a demon in ancient Assyrian myths. In Jewish tradition she was Adam's first wife, sent out of Eden and replaced by Eve because she would not submit to him. The offspring of Adam (or Samael) and Lilith were the evil spirits of the world.
LONÁN   m   Irish
Means "little blackbird", derived from Irish Gaelic lon "blackbird" combined with a diminutive suffix.
MAKVALA   f   Georgian
Derived from Georgian მაყვალი (maqvali) meaning "blackberry".
MAURUS   m   Late Roman
Latin name which meant "dark skinned". This was the name of numerous early saints, most notably a follower of Saint Benedict.
MELAINA   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a nymph in Greek mythology.
MELANIE   f   English, German, Dutch
From Mélanie, the French form of the Latin name Melania, derived from Greek μελαινα (melaina) meaning "black, dark". This was the name of a Roman saint who gave all her wealth to charity in the 5th century. Her grandmother was also a saint with the same name.... [more]
MELANTHIOS   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek μελας (melas) "black, dark" and ανθος (anthos) "flower". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of an insolent goatherd killed by Odysseus.
MERLE   f & m   English
Variant of MERRILL or MURIEL. The spelling has been influenced by the word merle meaning "blackbird" (via French, from Latin merula).
MIYAKO   f   Japanese
From Japanese (mi) meaning "beautiful", (ya) meaning "night" and (ko) meaning "child". This name can be formed from other combinations of kanji as well.
NIGEL   m   English
From Nigellus, a medieval Latinized form of NEIL. It was commonly associated with Latin niger "black". It was revived in the 19th century, perhaps in part due to Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Fortunes of Nigel' (1822).
NILA   f   Tamil, Indian, Hindi
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.
NILAM   f & m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Means "dark blue, sapphire" in Sanskrit.
NILIMA   f   Indian, Marathi, Hindi, Telugu
Means "dark blue" in Sanskrit.
NISHA   f   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Kannada, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu, Gujarati, Bengali, Nepali
Means "night" in Sanskrit.
NISHANT   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati
Means "night's end, dawn" in Sanskrit.
NYX   f   Greek Mythology
Means "night" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of the night, the daughter of Khaos and the wife of Erebos.
ORPHEUS   m   Greek Mythology
Perhaps related to Greek ορφνη (orphne) meaning "the darkness of night". In Greek mythology Orpheus was a poet and musician who went to the underworld to retrieve his dead wife Eurydice. He succeeded in charming Hades with his lyre, and he was allowed to lead his wife out of the underworld on the condition that he not look back at her until they reached the surface. Unfortunately, just before they arrived his love for her overcame his will and he glanced back at her, causing her to be drawn back to Hades.
OTIENO   m   Eastern African, Luo
Means "born at night" in Luo.
PHILOMEL   f   Literature
From an English word meaning "nightingale" (ultimately from PHILOMELA). It has been used frequently in poetry to denote the bird.
PHOENIX   m & f   English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird which appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
RAJANI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Hindi, Nepali
Means "the dark one" in Sanskrit. This is another name of the Hindu goddess Kali or Durga.
RAJNISH   m   Indian, Hindi
Means "lord of the night" from Sanskrit रजनि (rajani) meaning "night" and ईश (isha) meaning "lord, ruler". This is another name for the moon in Hindu texts.
RATREE   f   Thai
From the name of a variety of jasmine flower, the night jasmine, ultimately from a poetic word meaning "night".
SABLE   f   English (Modern)
From the English word meaning "black", derived from the name of the black-furred mammal native to Northern Asia, ultimately of Slavic origin.
SAM (2)   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Means "dark" in Avestan. This is the name of a hero in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SAUDA   f   Eastern African, Swahili
Means "dark complexion" in Swahili.
SENKA   f   Serbian, Croatian
Means "shadow" in Serbian and Croatian.
SHYAMA   m & f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi
Derived from Sanskrit श्याम (shyama) meaning "dark, black, blue". This is a transcription of the masculine form श्याम, which is another name of the Hindu god Krishna, as well as the feminine form श्यामा, one of the many names of the wife of the god Shiva. It is also the name of a Jain goddess.
SHYAMAL   m   Bengali
From Sanskrit श्यामल (shyamala), a derivative of श्याम (shyama) meaning "dark, black, blue".
SIAVASH   m   Persian, Persian Mythology
Means "possessing black stallions" in Avestan. This is the name of a prince in the 11th-century Persian epic the 'Shahnameh'.
SMITH   m   English
From an English surname meaning "metal worker, blacksmith", derived from Old English smitan "to smite, to hit". It is the most common surname in most of the English-speaking world.
SULLIVAN   m   English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Súilleabháin meaning "descendant of Súilleabhán". The name Súilleabhán means "little dark eye" in Irish.
SUNIL   m   Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Bengali, Assamese, Gujarati, Punjabi, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Malayalam, Nepali
From Sanskrit सु (su) meaning "good, very" combined with नील (nila) meaning "dark blue".
TINUVIEL   f   Literature
Means "nightingale" in Sindarin. In the 'Silmarillion' (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tinuviel was the daughter of Thingol the elf king and the beloved of Beren, who with her help retrieved one of the Silmarils from the iron crown of Morgoth.
ZELOPHEHAD   m   Biblical
Possibly means either "first born" or "shadow from terror" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament, Zelophehad is a man who dies while the Israelites are wandering in the wilderness, leaving five daughters as heirs.
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