Jesussaves7193's Personal Name List

ADDY (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AD-ee

Diminutive of ADELAIDE

ADELAIDE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Portuguese

Pronounced: AD-ə-layd (English), ah-de-LIE-de (Italian), ə-də-LIED (Portuguese)

From the French form of the Germanic name Adalheidis, which was composed of the elements adal "noble" and heid "kind, sort, type". It was borne in the 10th century by Saint Adelaide, the wife of the Holy Roman Emperor Otto the Great. The name became common in Britain in the 19th century due to the popularity of the German-born wife of King William IV, for whom the city of Adelaide in Australia was named in 1836.

ALEXANDER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Hungarian, Slovak, Biblical, Ancient Greek (Latinized), Greek Mythology (Latinized)

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρος (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: al-əg-ZAN-dər (English), ah-lek-SAHN-der (German), ah-lək-SAHN-dər (Dutch)

Latinized form of the Greek name Αλεξανδρος (Alexandros), which meant "defending men" from Greek αλεξω (alexo) "to defend, help" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). In Greek mythology this was another name of the hero Paris, and it also belongs to several characters in the New Testament. However, the most famous bearer was Alexander the Great, King of Macedon. In the 4th century BC he built a huge empire out of Greece, Egypt, Persia, and parts of India. Due to his fame, and later medieval tales involving him, use of his name spread throughout Europe.

The name has been used by kings of Scotland, Poland and Yugoslavia, emperors of Russia, and eight popes. Other notable bearers include English poet Alexander Pope (1688-1744), American statesman Alexander Hamilton (1755-1804), Scottish-Canadian explorer Sir Alexander MacKenzie (1764-1820), Russian poet Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837), and Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922), the Scottish-Canadian-American inventor of the telephone.

ALLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-ee

Diminutive of ALISON, ALEXANDRA or other names beginning with the same sound.

AMANDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Portuguese, Italian, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Late Roman

Pronounced: ə-MAN-də (English), ah-MAHN-dah (Spanish, Italian, German)

In part this is a feminine form of AMANDUS. However, it was not used during the Middle Ages. In the 17th century it was recreated by authors and poets who based it directly on Latin amanda "lovable, worthy of love". Notably, the playwright Colley Cibber used it for a character in his play 'Love's Last Shift' (1696). It came into regular use during the 19th century.

ANGEL

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Ангел (Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: AYN-jəl (English)

From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word αγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.

ANNIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-ee

Diminutive of ANNE (1)

ANTONIO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Croatian

Pronounced: ahn-TO-nyo (Spanish, Italian)

Spanish and Italian form of Antonius (see ANTHONY). A famous bearer was the Renaissance painter Antonio Pisanello.

AUBREY

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWB-ree

Norman French form of the Germanic name ALBERICH. As an English masculine name it was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, probably because of its similarity to Audrey.

AUDREY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AWD-ree

Medieval diminutive of ÆÐELÞRYÐ. This was the name of a 7th-century saint, a princess of East Anglia who founded a monastery at Ely. It was also borne by a character in Shakespeare's comedy 'As You Like It' (1599). At the end of the Middle Ages the name became rare due to association with the word tawdry (which was derived from St. Audrey, the name of a fair where cheap lace was sold), but it was revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was British actress Audrey Hepburn (1929-1993).

AUTUMN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AW-təm

From the name of the season, ultimately from Latin autumnus. This name has been in general use since the 1960s.

BELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEL

Short form of ISABELLA or names ending in belle. It is also associated with the French word belle meaning "beautiful". A famous bearer was Belle Starr (1848-1889), an outlaw of the American west, whose real given name was Maybelle.

BRADLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BRAD-lee

From a surname which originally came from a place name that meant "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).

CAMRYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: KAM-rin

Feminine variant of CAMERON

CASPIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: KAS-pee-ən (English)

Used by author C. S. Lewis for a character in his 'Chronicles of Narnia' series, first appearing in 1950. Prince Caspian first appears in the fourth book, where he is the rightful king of Narnia driven into exile by his evil uncle Miraz. Lewis probably based the name on the Caspian Sea, which was named for the city of Qazvin, which was itself named for the ancient Cas tribe.

COCO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Pronounced: KO-ko

Diminutive of names beginning with Co, influenced by the word cocoa. However, this was not the case for French fashion designer Coco Chanel (real name Gabrielle), whose nickname came from the name of a song she performed while working as a cabaret singer.

CORI

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAWR-ee

Feminine form of COREY

DMITRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Дмитрий (Russian)

Pronounced: DMEE-tree

Variant transcription of DMITRIY

DYLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology

Pronounced: DUL-an (Welsh), DIL-ən (English)

From the Welsh elements dy "great" and llanw "tide, flow". In Welsh mythology Dylan was a god or hero associated with the sea. He was the son of Arianrhod and was accidentally slain by his uncle Govannon.

Famous bearers include the Welsh poet Dylan Thomas (1914-1953) and the American musician Bob Dylan (1941-), real name Robert Zimmerman, who took his stage surname from the poet's given name. Due to those two bearers, use of the name has spread outside of Wales in the last half of the 20th century. It received a further boost in popularity in the 1990s due to a character on the television series 'Beverly Hills 90210'.

ELLA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə

Norman form of the Germanic name Alia, which was a short form of names containing the Germanic element alja meaning "other". It was introduced to England by the Normans and used until the 14th century, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A famous bearer was the American singer Ella Fitzgerald (1917-1996).

ELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: EL

Diminutive of ELEANOR and other names beginning with El. This name can also be given in reference to the French pronoun elle meaning "she".

ELLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch

Pronounced: EL-ee (English), EL-lee (Dutch)

Dutch diminutive of ELISABETH or an English variant of ELLIE.

EMERALD

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: EM-ə-rəld

From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμαραγδος (smaragdos).

ENRIQUE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: en-REE-ke

Spanish form of HENRY

ÉOWYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: AY-ə-win (English)

Personal note: Wyn

Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.

ERIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: ER-in

Anglicized form of EIREANN. It has been used as a given name since the middle of the 20th century.

EVAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: EV-ən (English)

Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.

EVANGELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen

Means "good news" from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

EVELYN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English, German

Pronounced: EV-ə-lin (English), EV-lin (English)

From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.

FAITH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: FAYTH

Simply from the English word faith, ultimately from Latin fidere "to trust". This was one of the virtue names adopted by the Puritans in the 17th century.

FIONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: fee-O-nə

Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).

FRANCESCA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Catalan

Pronounced: frahn-CHES-kah (Italian)

Italian and Catalan feminine form of Franciscus (see FRANCIS).

GALADRIEL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Pronounced: gə-LAD-ree-əl (English)

Personal note: Elly

Means "maiden crowned with a radiant garland" in Sindarin. Galadriel was a Noldorin elf princess renowned for her beauty and wisdom in J. R. R. Tolkien's novels. The elements are galad "radiant" and riel "garlanded maiden". Alatáriel is the Quenya form of her name.

GENEVIEVE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JEN-ə-veev

Personal note: Veevee

English form of GENEVIÈVE

HEATHER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HE-dhər

From the English word heather for the variety of small shrubs with pink or white flowers which commonly grow in rocky areas. It is derived from Middle English hather. It was first used as a given name in the late 19th century, though it did not become popular until the last half of the 20th century.

HENRY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HEN-ree

From the Germanic name Heimirich which meant "home ruler", composed of the elements heim "home" and ric "power, ruler". It was later commonly spelled Heinrich, with the spelling altered due to the influence of other Germanic names like Haganrich, in which the first element is hagan "enclosure".

Heinrich was popular among continental royalty, being the name of seven German kings, starting with the 10th-century Henry I the Fowler, and four French kings. In France it was rendered Henri from the Latin form Henricus.

The Normans introduced this name to England, and it was subsequently used by eight kings, ending with the infamous Henry VIII in the 16th century. During the Middle Ages it was generally rendered as Harry or Herry in English pronunciation. Notable bearers include arctic naval explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611), British novelist Henry James (1843-1916), and American automobile manufacturer Henry Ford (1863-1947).

HERMIONE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: ‘Ερμιονη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: hər-MIE-ə-nee (English)

Personal note: Mione

Derived from the name of the Greek messenger god HERMES. In Greek myth Hermione was the daughter of Menelaus and Helen. This is also the name of the wife of Leontes in Shakespeare's play 'The Winter's Tale' (1610). It is now closely associated with the character Hermione Granger from the Harry Potter series of books, first released in 1997.

HOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HOP

From the English word hope, ultimately from Old English hopian. This name was first used by the Puritans in the 17th century.

ISIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Egyptian Mythology (Hellenized)

Other Scripts: Ισις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-sis (English)

Greek form of Egyptian Ist (reconstructed as Iset or Ueset), which possibly meant "the throne". In Egyptian mythology Isis was the goddess of the sky and nature, the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus. She was originally depicted wearing a throne-shaped headdress, but in later times she was conflated with the goddess Hathor and depicted having the horns of a cow on her head. She was also worshipped by people outside of Egypt, such as the Greeks and Romans.

JACK

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAK

Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of JOHN. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as 'Jack and the Beanstalk', 'Little Jack Horner', and 'Jack Sprat'. American writers Jack London (1876-1916) and Jack Kerouac (1922-1969) were two famous bearers of this name. It is also borne by American actor Jack Nicholson (1937-).

JAMISON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAY-mi-sən

Personal note: Jameson

From an English surname meaning "son of JAMES".

JANE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan. Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This was also the name of the central character in Charlotte Bronte's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847).

JOELLE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Feminine form of JOEL

JOHAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Low German, Dutch, Czech

Pronounced: YOO-ahn (Swedish), YO-hahn (German)

Scandinavian, Low German and Czech form of Iohannes (see JOHN).

JOY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOI

Simply from the English word joy, ultimately derived from Norman French joie, Latin gaudia. Is has been regularly used as a given name since the late 19th century.

JULIET

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JOO-lee-et, JOOL-yət

Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play 'Romeo and Juliet' (1596).

LEONARDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, History

Pronounced: le-o-NAHR-do (Italian, Spanish), lee-ə-NAHR-do (English)

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).

LILLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: LIL-ee (English)

English variant of LILY. It is also used in Scandinavia, as a form of LILY or a diminutive of ELISABETH.

LINCOLN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LING-kən

From a surname which was originally from the name of a city in England, derived from Brythonic lindo "lake, pool" and Latin colonia "colony". This name is usually given in honour of Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865), president of the United States during the American Civil War.

LOVE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LUV

Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.

LUCY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LOO-see

English form of LUCIA, in use since the Middle Ages.

LUNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Means "the moon" in Latin. Luna was the Roman goddess of the moon, frequently depicted driving a white chariot through the sky.

LYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIN

Variant of LYNN

MAXIMILIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish

Pronounced: mahk-see-MEE-lee-ahn (German), mak-si-MIL-ee-ən (English), mak-si-MIL-yən (English)

From the Roman name Maximilianus, which was derived from MAXIMUS. It was borne by a 3rd-century saint and martyr. In the 15th century the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III gave this name to his son and eventual heir. In this case it was a blend of the names of the Roman generals Fabius Maximus and Cornelius Scipio Aemilianus (see EMILIANO), who Frederick admired. It was subsequently borne by a second Holy Roman Emperor, two kings of Bavaria, and a short-lived Habsburg emperor of Mexico.

MELISSA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Dutch, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Μελισσα (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: mə-LIS-ə (English)

Means "bee" in Greek. This was the name of a nymph that cared for young Zeus in Greek mythology. It is also the name of the fairy who helps Rogero escape from the witch Alcina in Ludovico Ariosto's poem 'Orlando Furioso' (1516). As an English given name, Melissa has been used since the 18th century.

MIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: MEE-ah (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German), MEE-ə (English)

Scandinavian, Dutch and German diminutive of MARIA. It coincides with the Italian word mia meaning "mine".

MILEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MIE-lee

In the case of actress and singer Miley Cyrus (1992-), it is a shortened form of the nickname Smiley, given to her by her father because she often smiled. Although it was not at all common before she brought it to public attention, there are some examples of its use before her time, most likely as a diminutive of MILES.

MILLICENT

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIL-ə-sənt

From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.

MISTY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MIS-tee

From the English word misty, ultimately derived from Old English. The jazz song 'Misty' (1954) by Erroll Garner may have helped popularize the name.

NICHOLAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, French

Pronounced: NIK-ə-ləs (English), nee-ko-LAH (French)

From the Greek name Νικολαος (Nikolaos) which meant "victory of the people" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and λαος (laos) "people". Saint Nicholas was a 4th-century bishop from Anatolia who, according to legend, saved the daughters of a poor man from lives of prostitution. He is the patron saint of children, sailors and merchants, as well as Greece and Russia. He formed the basis for the figure known as Santa Claus (created in the 19th century from Dutch Sinterklaas), the bringer of Christmas presents.

Due to the renown of the saint, this name has been widely used in the Christian world. It has been common in England since the 12th century, though it became a bit less popular after the Protestant Reformation. The name has been borne by five popes and two czars of Russia.

NOËL

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: no-EL

Means "Christmas" in French. In the Middle Ages it was used for children born on the holiday. A famous bearer was the English playwright and composer Noël Coward (1899-1973).

PENELOPE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English

Other Scripts: Πηνελοπη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: pə-NEL-ə-pee (English)

Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.

PIPER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: PIEP-ər

From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.

RAIN

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: RAYN

Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.

RIVER

Gender: Feminine & Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: RIV-ər

From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".

RYAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: RIE-ən

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Riain meaning "descendent of Rían". The given name Rían probably means "little king" (from Irish "king" combined with a diminutive suffix).

RYLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: RIE-lən

Possibly a variant of the English surname Ryland, which was originally derived from a place name meaning "rye land" in Old English.

SAMANTHA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian, Dutch

Pronounced: sə-MAN-thə (English)

Perhaps intended to be a feminine form of SAMUEL, using the name suffix antha (possibly inspired by Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower"). It originated in America in the 18th century but was fairly uncommon until 1964, when it was popularized by the main character on the television show 'Bewitched'.

SHAWNA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SHAW-nə

Feminine form of SHAWN

SILVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SIL-vər

From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.

SOPHIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German, Dutch

Pronounced: so-FEE (French), SO-fee (English), ZO-fee (German)

French form of SOPHIA

STARR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: STAHR

Variant of STAR

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

STORM

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: STORM

From the English word storm, ultimately from Old English.

SYLVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, German

Pronounced: SIL-vee-ə (English), SUYL-vee-ah (Finnish)

Variant of SILVIA. This has been the most common English spelling since the 19th century.

TODD

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TAHD

From a surname meaning "fox", derived from Middle English todde.

TRINITY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TRIN-i-tee

From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.

WENDY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WEN-dee

In the case of the character from J. M. Barrie's play 'Peter Pan' (1904), it was created from the nickname fwendy "friend", given to the author by a young friend. However, the name was used prior to the play (rarely), in which case it could be related to the Welsh name GWENDOLEN and other names beginning with the element gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed".

WINTER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: WIN-tər

From the English word for the season, derived from Old English winter.

ZARA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: ZAHR-ə

English form of ZAÏRE. In England it came to public attention when Princess Anne gave it to her daughter in 1981. Use of the name may also be influenced by the trendy Spanish clothing retailer Zara.

ZOË

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Dutch, English

Pronounced: ZO-ee (English)

Dutch form and English variant of ZOE

ZORA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Serbian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Зора (Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

From a South and West Slavic word meaning "dawn, aurora".
Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.