Anglo-Saxon Submitted Names

Anglo-Saxon names were used by the Anglo-Saxons who inhabited ancient England. See also about Germanic names.
 more filters...
Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ÆGEN m Anglo-Saxon
Diminutive of names beginning with Ægen, such as Ægenbald and Ægenwulf.
ÆGENBALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æġen, āgan, "to own, possess, have" and beald "bold".
ÆGENWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æġen, āgan, "to own, possess, have" and wulf "wolf".
ǢLĀF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Olaf.
ÆLFHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Alfher.
ÆLFRÚN f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and rún "secret, hidden knowledge, mystery, dark mysterious statement" (also "a runic letter").
ÆLFWARU f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and waru (plural wara) "guard" (i.e., guardian of a particular place by profession).
ÆLFWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weald "leader, ruler".
ÆLFWYNN f Anglo-Saxon
Means "elf joy" from Old English ælf "elf" and wynn "joy". It was borne by a granddaughter of Alfred the Great.
ÆLLE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "all, universal" in Old English. It was borne by several Anglo-Saxon kings, including the legendary first king of the South Saxons.
AELYTH f Anglo-Saxon (Anglicized, Rare), Popular Culture
Of Anglo-Saxon origin, this soft name has several strong meanings, the Anglo-Saxon one being, “seasoned warrior.” It’s the medieval form of Æðelgyð, which means “noble war.” Aelythis also thought to be a variant spelling of the Scottish Gaelic Alyth, meaning “ascending, rising”... [more]
ÆSCHERE m Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Derived from the Old English elements æsc "ash tree" and here "army". This name occurs in the 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf' belonging to King Hroðgar's most trusted adviser; Æschere is killed by Grendel's mother in her attack on Heorot after Grendel's death.
ÆSCWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æsc "ash tree" and wine "friend".
ÆSCWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æsc "ash tree" and wulf "wolf".
ÆÐELBEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbald.
ÆÐELGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Means "noble spear" from Old English æðel "noble" and gar "spear". It is a cognate of Adalgar.
ÆÐELGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Means "noble gift", from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and giefu "gift".
ÆÐELGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and gyð "war". It is a cognate of Adalgund. This was the name of an Anglo-Saxon saint (Æthelgyth of Coldingham).
ÆÐELHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalhard.
ÆÐELHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and here "army".
ÆÐELHILD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and hild "battle".
ÆÐELMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalmund.
ÆTHELWALD m Anglo-Saxon, History
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwold. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwald Moll, an 8th-century king of Northumbria.
ÆTHELWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Variant spelling of Æþelweald, which itself is a variant form of Æðelweald, an Anglo-Saxon masculine name that is composed of Old English æðel meaning "noble" and Old English weald meaning "power, leader, ruler".... [more]
ÆTHELWIN m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æþelwine (see Æthelwine), which itself is a variant of Æðelwine.
ÆTHELWOLD m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwald. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwold of East Anglia, a 7th-century king of East Anglia.
ÆÐELWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalwolf (see Adolf).
ALCUIN m Anglo-Saxon (?), Ancient Germanic (Frankish, ?)
Old French name of Germanic origin, derived from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple" and win "friend" (compare Alawin). Alcuin was an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon scholar and theologian... [more]
ALFLED f Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Probably a variant of Ælfflæd. Also compare Æðelflæd (see Elfleda).
ALSIGE m Anglo-Saxon
Possibly a variant of Ælfsige.
ANLĀF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Olaf.
BEORHTGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Means "fair gift" from the Old English elements beorht "bright" and giefu "gift". It occurs in Goscelin's 'Life of Saint Edith' belonging to an Anglo-Saxon abbess of the convent at Wilton.
BEORMA m Anglo-Saxon
Beorma variously means, in Old English, "fermented," "head of beer," "yeasty" or "frothy." Beorma is the name most commonly given to the circa 7th-century Anglo-Saxon founder or later leader of the settlement now known as the English city of Birmingham before its first mention in 1086.
BEORNMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements beorn "warrior, man" and mund "protection".
BEORNWYNN f Anglo-Saxon
From Old English beorn "warrior" (literally "bear") and wynn "joy".
BERCHTUN m Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of Beorhthun. This was borne by an 8th-century English saint.
BERHTEL m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name containing the Germanic name element BERAHT "bright".
BLÆCSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Means "black stone" in Old English.
BLAECWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Combination of blæc "black" or blāc "pale" and wulf "wolf".
BOISIL m Anglo-Saxon (?)
Saint Boisil is a famous bearer. The Scottish village of St Boswells (Scots: Bosells, Scottish Gaelic: Cille Bhoisil) is named after him.
BOSA m Anglo-Saxon
Of unknown meaning.... [more]
BOTOLPH m Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Histoy
English form of Botolphus, which was a variant form of Botulphus (see Botulph, Botwulf). Saint Botolph was a 7th-century religious leader in East Anglia, patron of travellers and namesake of the town of Boston (originally Botolphston).
BOTWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Botulf. This was the name of a 7th-century religious leader in East Anglia who became the patron saint of travellers and namesake of the town of Boston (originally Botolphston).
BREGUSWIÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English bregu "ruler" (supposedly borrowed from Old Norse bragr "best, most splendid"; compare Bragi) and swiþ "strong". This was borne by the mother of the 7th-century English saint Hilda of Whitby.
BRICTEVA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Medieval English
Latinized form of the Old English name Brihtgifu, a metathesis of Beorhtgifu.
BRYNI m Anglo-Saxon
Meaning "fire".
BUDDA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of uncertain meaning, perhaps related to Brythonic boud "victory". It coincides with an Old English word meaning "beetle" (and could be a byname derived from it).
BURGHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements burg "fortress" and heard "brave, hardy". It is a cognate of Burkhard.
BYRHTFERTH m Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English name Byrhtferð, derived from Old English byrht, which is a variant of beorht "bright, clear", and an uncertain second element which may be derived from ferhð "spirit" or may be a West Saxon metathesis of Anglian frið "peace" (making this name a cognate of Beorhtfrith).
CEAWLIN m Anglo-Saxon, English (Rare)
Ceawlin (died ca. 593) was a King of Wessex.
CEDD m Anglo-Saxon (Rare, Archaic)
St. Cedd of Lastingham was Bishop of Essex in the seventh century.
CENFUS m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name, in which the first element is cene "bold, keen". This name was borne by a king of Wessex who ruled briefly, during 674; he was succeeded by his son Aescwine.
CEOL m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ceol "keel". Ceol (also known as Ceola or Ceolric) was King of Wessex from 592 to 597.
CEOLA m Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Ceol.
CEOLRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and ric "power, rule".
CEOLSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel" and stan "stone".
CEOLWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ceol "keel (of a ship)" and wulf "wolf".
CISSA m Anglo-Saxon, History
Meaning unknown. One source theorizes that the name might possibly be derived from Old English cisse meaning "gravelly place" or from Old English cís meaning "fastidious". Even Old Norse kyssa meaning "to kiss" was suggested by this source, but this seems unlikely, given that this name is Anglo-Saxon in origin.... [more]
COENWULF m Anglo-Saxon
A dithematic name formed from the name elements KUONI "keen, brave" and WULF "wolf".... [more]
CREDAN m Anglo-Saxon (?), Cornish (?)
Saint Credan of Evesham is a famous bearer, and was known as Credus or Credanus in Latin. Sancreed, in Cornwall, is named for another Saint Credan.
CREODA m Anglo-Saxon
First king of Mercia.
CUTHBALD m Anglo-Saxon
Means "famously bold", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English beald meaning "bold".
CUTHBURG f Anglo-Saxon
Means "famous fortress", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English burg meaning "fortress".
CUTHBURGA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of Cuthburg. Also compare Cuthburh.
CUTHBURH f Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Cuthburg. Also compare Wilburg versus Wilburh. This name was borne by the wife of the early 8th-century king Aldfrith of Northumbria.
CUTHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Means "famously brave", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English heard meaning "brave, hardy".... [more]
CUTHFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Means "famous beauty", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English flæd meaning "beauty".
CUTHFRITH m Anglo-Saxon
Means "famous peace", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English friþ meaning "peace".
CUTHHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "famous army", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English here meaning "army".
CUTHRED m Anglo-Saxon, History
Means "famous counsel", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English ræd meaning "counsel".... [more]
CUTHSWITH f Anglo-Saxon
Means "famously strong", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English swiþ meaning "strong".... [more]
CUTHWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "famous friend", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English wine meaning "friend".
CUTHWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Means "famous wolf", derived from Old English cuþ meaning "famous" (see Cuthbert) combined with Old English wulf meaning "wolf".... [more]
CWENBURH f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements cwen "woman, wife" and burg "fortress".
CWÉNHILD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements cwén "woman, wife" and hild "war, battle".
CWENÞRYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English elements cwen "woman, wife" and þryð "strength".
CYNESTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English cyne "royal" and stan "stone".
CYNESWIÐ f Anglo-Saxon
From Old English cyne "royal" and swiþ "strong". Saint Cyneswide was a younger sister of Saint Cyneburga.
CYNETHRYTH f Anglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English cyne meaning "royal" combined with Old English þryð meaning "strength".... [more]
CYNEWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Means "royal wolf" from Old English cyne "royal" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon poet as well as a king of Wessex.
CYNRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Old English younger form of Cyneric and Ceneric.
DEORSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and stan "stone".
DEORWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wulf "wolf".
DEORWYNN f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements deor "dear" and wynn "joy".
DOMBEORHT m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English dom meaning "judgement, law" combined with Old English beorht meaning "bright".
DOMHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English dom meaning "judgement, law" combined with Old English here meaning "army".... [more]
DOMWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English dom meaning "judgement, law" combined with Old English weald meaning "power, leader, ruler".... [more]
DRACA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname (and, less frequently, given name) meaning "snake" or "dragon", derived from Latin draco "snake, monster" (see Draco), applied to someone with a fierce or fiery temperament.
EADA m Anglo-Saxon (Rare)
From Old English ead "wealth, riches" or, by poetic extension, "prosperity, happiness". This name was used by the Anglo-Saxons, although it seems to have been rare.
EADBALD m Anglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English beald meaning "bold".... [more]
EADBURH f Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Eadburg. Also compare Wilburg versus Wilburh.... [more]
EADFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English flæd meaning "beauty". In other words, you could say that this name is the Anglo-Saxon cognate of Audofleda.... [more]
EADGIFU f Anglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English giefu meaning "gift" (see Godiva and Sunniva).... [more]
EADHELM m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English ead "rich, blessed" combined with Germanic helm "helmet, protection". This was the name of a 10th-century English bishop.
EADHILD f Anglo-Saxon, History
Derived from Old English ead meaning "wealth, fortune" combined with Old English hild meaning "battle". In other words, you could say that this name is the Anglo-Saxon cognate of Audhild.... [more]
EADHUN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead meaning "wealth, fortune" and hun meaning "bear cub". This name was borne by a 9th-century bishop of Winchester.
EADMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of Othmar.
EADMER m Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Eadmær. This was most notably borne by a 12th-century Benedictine monk and historian.
EADRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Means "rich counsel" from the Old English elements ead "rich, blessed" and ræd "counsel".
EÁDWEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English variant of Eadweard.
EALDHELM m Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Aldhelm. This name was borne by an Anglo-Saxon saint from the 8th century AD, who is nowadays mostly known under the name Aldhelm.
EALDWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Means "old wolf", derived from the Old English elements eald "old" and wulf "wolf".
EALHFRITH m Anglo-Saxon
Composed of the Old English elements ealh "temple" and frið "peace".
EALHMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Composed of the Old English elements ealh "temple" and mund "protection".
EALHSWIÞ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ealh "temple" combined with swiþ "strong". A famous bearer was Ealhswith of the Gaini (c.852-905), beloved queen of Alfred the Great.
EANBALD m Anglo-Saxon
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANBERHT m Anglo-Saxon
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANFRITH m Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Eanfrið. A known bearer of this name was king Eanfrith of Bernicia (7th century AD).
EANFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANHERE m Anglo-Saxon
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANMUND m Anglo-Saxon
The meaning of the first element of this name is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANRED m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English name Eanræd, of which the meaning of the first element is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EANSWITH f Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English feminine name Eanswið or Eanswiþ, of which the meaning of the first element is uncertain. It might possibly be derived from Old English eane meaning "lamb" or the Old English verb eanian meaning "to give birth" (usually of animals), which is etymologically related to the modern English verb to yean... [more]
EARNWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Arnulf.
ÉASTORHILD f Anglo-Saxon
Allegedly from the name of the Germanic fertility goddess Eostre combined with the Old English element hild "battle". It is a cognate of Austrahild.
EATA m Anglo-Saxon (?)
Bishop Eata of Lindisfarne is a famous bearer.
ECGFRITH m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and friþ "peace". This name was borne by a 7th-century king of the Northumbrians and an 8th-century king of Mercia.
ECGWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Means "sword wolf", from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and wulf. This name was borne by an 8th-century bishop of London.
EDRED m Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), English (Archaic)
Latinized form of Eadræd. This was the name of a 10th-century king of England.
ENGELGÝÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the Germanic element Angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and Old English gyð "battle".
EOFORHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate to EVERARD
EOMER m Anglo-Saxon, Popular Culture
Eomer was, according to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, the great-great-grandfather of Creoda of Mercia, the first King of Mercia. He is considered the ancestor to the Kings of Mercia.... [more]
EORMENTHRYTH f Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Ermendrud.
ERMENILDA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of Eormenhild, the Old English cognate of Erminhilt. This was borne by a 7th-century English saint.
FOLCBEORHT m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Fulbert.
FRIÐURIC m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Friduric.
FRIÐUWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Fridolf.
FRODA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Fróði.
GODGYFU f Anglo-Saxon
Original form of Godiva.
GODGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name derived from the elements god "god" and gyð "battle".
GODSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English god "god" and stan "stone".
GOLDA m Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Both an Old English byname derived from gold "gold" and a short form of various compound names beginning with the Old English element gold, such as Goldstan or Goldwine. This name persisted into the Middle Ages.
GOLDING m Medieval English, Anglo-Saxon
Late Old English personal name meaning "son of Golda" or "son of Golde", derived from Golda (or the feminine form Golde) and the Old English patronymic suffix -ing.
GOLDIVA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Medieval English
Latinized form of *Goldgifu, an unrecorded Old English name meaning "gold gift" from the elements gold and giefu "gift".
GRIM m Anglo-Saxon, Old Danish, Old Swedish, Swedish, Norwegian
Medieval form of Grímr meaning "mask, helmet", which remained popular in Anglo-Scandinavian areas well into the 12th century. This was used as another name for the Norse god Odin. Alternatively, as an Old Danish and Old Swedish name derived from Old Norse grimmr "cruel, grim", often used as a part of a name such as Tyrgrim or Grimulf.
GUTHLAC m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Guthleikr. This was the name of a popular Christian saint, Guthlac of Crowland (674-715), a Mercian hermit and wonderworker.
HAGUNA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English pet form of combinations containing the name element hago "hedge", "enclosure".
HEARDBEORHT m Anglo-Saxon
From Old English heard "brave, hardy" and beorht "bright". It is a cognate of Hardbert.
HENGEST m Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Hengist.
HEREFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements here "army" and frið "peace".
HYGEBALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements hyge "thought, mind" and beald "bold". This was the name of a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon saint, also known as Hybald.
ICEL m Anglo-Saxon
Icel of Mercia was a 6th-century Anglish king in Britain.
INGELD m Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Old English name, possibly derived from the Old English intensive prefix in- and geld, gield "payment, tribute". This was the name of a legendary prince of the Heathobards who appears in Anglo-Saxon tales, including the 8th-century epic poem Beowulf.
ISAMBARD m English, Anglo-Saxon
The name Isambard is derived from the Old German name Isanbert, which was already common in the south-west of Germany before the 8th century, and means "glittering iron". As Isanbert, it came to England with the Anglo-Saxons, but fell out of favour after the Norman Conquest... [more]
ISANBERT m Ancient Germanic, Anglo-Saxon
Means "bright iron" (perhaps "glittering iron") from the Old High German elements isan "iron" and beraht "bright". (Allegedly) by the 8th century this name was already common in the south-west of Germany... [more]
LEODMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leod "nation, people" and mær "famous". It is a cognate of Liutmar.
LEODSTAN m Anglo-Saxon
Formed from the name elements LEOD "people" and STAN "stone".
LÉOFCWÉN f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and cwen "woman, wife".
LEOFE f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English leof "dear, beloved".
LEOFFLEAD f Anglo-Saxon
Means "dear beauty" in Old English.
LEOFGEAT m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name meaning "dear Geat", composed of the element leof "dear, beloved" combined with Geat, which referred to a member of the Germanic tribe, the Geats. Perhaps it was an epithet of the hero Beowulf, a legendary Geat (which is cognate to Goth and Gaut).
LEOFGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name meaning "dear gift", from the elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and giefu "gift".
LEOFMAN m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element leof "dear, beloved" combined with mann "man, person".
LEOFNOTH m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" and noþ "courage". Leuca, Leofeca and Leofa are diminutives of Leofnoth.
LÉOFRÚN f Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English element leof "dear, agreeable, beloved" combined with rún "secret, mystery, whisper".
MEREWYN f Anglo-Saxon
From the Old English mǣr "famous" and wynn "joy".
MERWENNA f Anglo-Saxon
Modern form of Merewyn.
OERIC m Anglo-Saxon (German, Archaic)
Means "ash tree" in Old English. Oeric was the birth name of 'Oisc of Kent', a 5th-century king of Kent. Oisc (also Aesc or Esc) ruled for twenty-four years, from 488 to 516. He seems to have been the son or the grandson of Hengest, who led the initial Anglo-Saxon conquest and settlement of Kent... [more]
OFFA m Anglo-Saxon
A diminutive form of -ulf -wulf and -olf names. King Offa of Mercia was a famous bearer.
ORDGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Old English name meaning "spear-point", derived from Old English ord "point (especially of a weapon)" and gar "spear". It is a cognate of Old Norse Oddgeirr.
ORDRIC m Anglo-Saxon
Ordric was a monk at Abingdon who was elected Abbot of Abingdon in 1052 AD and died in 1066.
OSBALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English beald meaning "bold". This name was borne by an 8th-century king of Northumbria.
OSFRIÐ m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English friþ meaning "peace".
OSGYTH f Anglo-Saxon
Composed of the two name elements OS "god" and GYÐ "battle".
OSHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English here meaning "army".... [more]
OSLAC m Anglo-Saxon
King of Sussex
OSMAR m Anglo-Saxon, English (Rare), German (Rare)
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories include a variant of Ansmar and a variant of Osmær.... [more]
OSRED m Anglo-Saxon, History
Variant spelling of the Old English name Osræd, which was derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English ræd meaning "counsel".... [more]
OSRIC m Anglo-Saxon, English (Rare), Literature
Derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English ric meaning "power, rule". This name was borne by several Anglo-Saxon kings, one of the earliest being Osric of Deira (7th century AD).... [more]
OSTHRYTH f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English ōs "god" and þryð "strength", making it a cognate of Anstrud. This was borne by a 7th-century Mercian queen.
OSWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English os meaning "god" combined with Old English wulf meaning "wolf". This name was borne by an 8th-century king of Northumbria.
OSWY m Anglo-Saxon
"Oswiu, also known as Oswy or Oswig (Old English: Ōswīg) (c. 612 – 15 February 670), was King of Bernicia from 642 until his death. One of the sons of Æthelfrith of Bernicia, he became king following the death of his brother Oswald in 642... [more]
PEARTA m Anglo-Saxon
Meaning unknown.
PENDA m History, Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown origin. Penda was a 7th-century king of Mercia, the Anglo-Saxon kingdom in what is today the English Midlands.
PEOTLA m Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-saxon monothematic name. See Pelham.
PŒGA m & f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of unknown meaning. It relates to the name PEYTON.
PUTTA m Anglo-Saxon
Old English byname meaning "kite (bird of prey)", originally a nickname given to a fierce or rapacious person.
QUIMBURGA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Popular Culture
Quimburga is a latinisation of the Anglo-saxon name Cyneburga. Quimburga is the name of a notable cyclone in northern Germany in 1972.
RÆDGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Radgund.
RÆDMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Radmund.
RÆDWALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ræd "counsel" and weald "rule". It was borne by a king of East Anglia.
RÍCMÆG f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name of uncertain meaning. The first element, ríc may be identical with Germanic ric "power, rule", and mæg may be from mægden "maiden" or mean "kinsman" (compare Isemay, Sedemay)... [more]
SÆGIEFU f Anglo-Saxon
Means "sea gift", from the Old English elements "sea" and giefu "gift".
SÆÞRYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name meaning "sea strength" from the element "sea" combined with þryð "strength". Saint Saethryth was an Anglo-Saxon princess and nun of the 7th century.
SÆWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Possibly derived from Old English elements "sea" and wulf "wolf".
SEAXNĒAT m Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Old English cognate of Sahsnot, as the name consists of Old English seax meaning "knife, dagger, sword" combined with Old English nēad meaning "help, need".... [more]
SEXIVA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized, ?)
Latinized form of the hypothetical Old English name *Seaxgifu, derived from seax "knife" and giefu "gift".
SIGENOTH m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Sigenot.
SIGERÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English sige "victory" combined with Old English ræd "counsel". This name was borne by a King of Essex, as well as a King of Kent.
SWITHBERHT m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements swith "strong" and beorht "bright". Saint Swithberht (also known as Suitbert) was a missionary to and bishop in Frisia from 692/3 to ca. 713.
TYRGRIM m Ancient Scandinavian, Anglo-Saxon
Combination of the names Tyr and Grim.
UHTRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements uhta "pre-dawn" and ræd "counsel".
WALTHEOF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English weald "power" and þeof "thief". This was the name of a 12th-century English saint, a stepson of King David I of Scotland.
WATT m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Diminutive of Walter. This name was borne by a Sussex king that ruled possibly around 692 to 700 CE.
WEALDHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Walter.
WERBURG f Anglo-Saxon
Name of St. Werburg.
WERBURGA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of Wærburg (see Werburg). This was the name of a 7th-century English saint and the patroness of Chester. She was the daughter of King Wulfhere of Mercia and Saint Ermenilda.
WIFRUN f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wif "woman, wife" and run "whisper, secret, runic letter".
WIGBEORN m Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon cognate of Wigbern.
WIGLAF m Anglo-Saxon, German (Modern, Rare)
A Germanic dithematic name, combining wig (fight, battle, war etc.) and laf (what or who is left). In the context of a typical dithematic name, where the two elements may be as independent in meaning as separate names, "laf" should probably be read as "one who remains, one who survives or endures".... [more]
WILFRIDA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latin form of the Old English name Wulfþryð meaning "wolf strength". This was the name of the mother of Saint Eadgyð (Edith) by King Edgar the Peaceful.
WILLEHADUS m Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Willehad, composed of Old English wil meaning "will, desire" and Germanic hadu "battle, combat".
WINAMAN m Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Wineman, the Old English cognate of Winiman. This was the name of an 11th-century English saint who went to Sweden as a missionary, where he was martyred by local pagans.
WINTRA m & f English (Archaic), Anglo-Saxon, African American, English
Old English byname meaning "winter", originally given to a person with a frosty or gloomy temperament.... [more]
WITHBURGA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Old English name Wihtburg, which was composed of the elements wiht "person" and burg "fortress". This was borne by an 8th-century English saint, said to be the youngest daughter of King Anna of East Anglia.
WUFFA m Anglo-Saxon
Wuffa is recorded in the Anglo-Saxon genealogies as an early king of East Anglia. If historical, he would have flourished in the 6th century.
WULFFLÆD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and flæd "beauty".
WULFGÉAT m Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon name with the combination of wulf "wolf" and géat "Goth, Geat, from Gautland (= Götaland, Gothia in southern Sweden)".
WULFGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Original form of Wulviva.
WULFMÆR m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and mær "famous".
WULFTHRYTH f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf meaning "wolf" and þryð "strength". This was the name of a 9th-century queen of Wessex, the wife of King Æthelred. This was also borne by Saint Wulfthryth of Wilton, a 10th-century English abbess who was the mother of Saint Edith by King Edgar the Peaceful.
WULVIVA f Anglo-Saxon (Latinized), Medieval English
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and giefu "gift".
YMAR m Anglo-Saxon
Possibly an Old English name in which the second element is mær "famous". Saint Ymar was a 9th-century Benedictine monk at Reculver Abbey in Kent, England, who was killed by marauding Danes... [more]
YWI m Anglo-Saxon
Perhaps from the Old English elements íw "yew tree" and wig "war". Ywi (or Iwig) was an Anglo-Saxon saint venerated in the English county of Wiltshire in the Middle Ages, where his relics were enshrined (at the county town, Wilton, near Salisbury)... [more]