Medieval English Submitted Names

These names were used by medieval English peoples.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABBUD m Medieval English
Derived from Old English abbud meaning "abbot".
ACARD m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-saxon elements ac meaning "oak" and ard meaning "hard."
ACWULF m Medieval English
Name created with the elements ac "oak" and wulf 'wolf.'
ADBREI m Medieval English
Of debated origin and meaning.... [more]
ADCOCK m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
ADECOCK m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
ADELELM m Medieval English
Composed of elements Adel meaning "noble", and helm meaning "helmet." Variant of Adelhelm.
ADELIZA f Medieval English, Old Swedish
Medieval English and Old Swedish form of Adelais. The second wife of Henry I of England bore this name.
ADELO m Medieval English
Composed with the element Adel meaning "noble."
ADELUND m Medieval English
Created with the element adel meaning "noble."
ADIE m Medieval English
Medieval pet form of Adam.
ADKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
ADMIRAL m American (Rare), Medieval English
From the English word admiral meaning "a commander of a fleet or naval squadron, or a naval officer of very high rank".
ADMIRANDA f Medieval English
Derived from Latin admirare "to admire".
ÆFFIC m Medieval English
Diminutive of Afa.
AELDIET f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. It has been speculated, however, to be a corruption of Old English Ealdgyth.
AELESIA f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Alicia.
AELEVA f Medieval English
Younger form of Old English Ælfgifu created with the Germanic elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and ewa meaning "ever." Compare Aelfeva.
AELLIC m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and lic with the contested meaning of "like" or "body."
ÆLLING m Medieval English
Ælling is a masculine Old English name in which an uncompounded name (Ælla, Ælli, or Alla) has been combined with the suffix –ing.
AELOD m Medieval English, Welsh
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ael meaning "hall, temple" and Auð meaning "wealth, fortune."
ÆLRIC m Medieval English
Derived from Old English æl "hall, temple" and ric "power", making the name a cognate of Alberich.
ÆSCMAN m Medieval English
Name using the Germanic elements Æsc meaning "ash" and man meaning "man" probably originally a byname from æscman ‘seaman’ or ‘pirate’, i.e. one who sailed in an ash-wood boat.
AETHELMER m Medieval English
Name combining the Anglo-Saxon element Ædel meaning "noble" and maer meaning "fame."
AETHELSI m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon element aethel meaning "noble" and the unknown element si.
ÆTHELWIN m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æþelwine (see Æthelwine), which itself is a variant of Æðelwine.
ÆTHELWOLD m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwald. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwold of East Anglia, a 7th-century king of East Anglia.
AFFERY f Literature, Medieval English
Meaning uncertain, possibly of Old English origin. It may be related to Avery or Aphra. Affery Flintwinch is a character in Charles Dickens' novel 'Little Dorrit' (1855-7).
AGACIA f Medieval English
Variant of Agatha (compare medieval French Agace).
AGENET m Medieval English, Medieval French
Combination of Agen, a habitational name for people in Lot-et-Garonne and Aveyron and -et, from diminutive suffix Latin -ettu-.
AGENILDA f Medieval English
Medieval English cognate of Agenilde.
AGENWULF m Medieval English
Perhaps a variant of Atenulf.
AGNELI m Medieval English, Medieval Scandinavian
From the Nordic name elements ag meaning "edge of sword, blade" and nelli.
AICUSA f Medieval English
Of unknown origin and meaning.
AILBERN m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of unknown Germanic element ail and Germanic element bern meaning "bear."
AILDAG m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of unknown German element ail and contested German element dag possibly meaning "brightness" or "day."
AILEVA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Old English Æðelgifu.
AILOVA f Medieval English
Apparently from an unattested Old English name composed of the elements æðel "noble" and lufu "love".
AILWI m Medieval English
Coalescence of several Old English names: Æðelwig "noble battle", Ealdwig "ancient battle", and Ælfwig "elf battle".
AISTAN m Medieval English
Possibly from the gothic verb áistan "to reverence."
AIULF m Medieval Italian, Medieval English, Ancient Germanic
A Germanic name formed from the name elements AGIN "edge (of a sword)" and WULF "wolf".
AKILE m Medieval English
Possibly early transcription of Akhilleus.
ALBOLD m Medieval English
Combination of unknown Anglo-Saxon element al "noble" and bold meaning "house."
ALBRAY f Medieval English
Vernacular form of Albreda.
ALBREA f Medieval English (Latinized)
Feminization of both Albericus and, in early medieval times, of Alfred.
ALBREDA f Medieval German, Medieval English
Medieval German feminine form of Alberich.
ALCUDE m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements al "noble" and cude from the element cueth meaning "famous."
ALDCHURL m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements ald meaning "noble" and churl "man."
ALDEVA f Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of ald meaning "old" and eva meaning "ever."
ALDFRITH m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Aldfrid.
ALDHILD f Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of Germanic elements ald meaning "old" and hild meaning "war."
ALDRED m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of Germanic elements ald meaning "old" and ræð meaning "counsel, wisdom."
ALDSTAN m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of Germanic elements ald meaning "old" and stan meaning "stone."
ALDWIF f Medieval English
Derived from Old English ealdwif "old woman".
ALDWY m Medieval English
Combination of ald "old" and wy meaning "holy site, shrine."
ALEVA f Medieval English
Combination of al "noble" and eva meaning "ever."
ALFGAR m Medieval English
Anglo-Scandianvian form of Alfgeirr.
ALFGEAT m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of Germanic elements alf meaning "elf" and gyð meaning "battle, war."
ALFGRIM m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of elements alf meaning "elf" and grim meaning "helmet, mask."
ALFHELM m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of Germanic elements alf meaning "elf" and helm meaning "protection."
ALFHERE m Medieval English, Medieval German
Combination of Germanic elements alf "elf" and here "army."
ALFKIL m Medieval English
Old Danish form of Alfkæll.
ALFLED f Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Probably a variant of Ælfflæd. Also compare Æðelflæd (see Elfleda).
ALFWY m Medieval English
Medieval form of Ælfwig.
ALGEARD m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon elements al meaning "noble" and ger "spear."
ALICIE f Medieval English
Late medieval English variant of Alicia.
ALIOT m Medieval English
Diminutive of Ellis or Elias.
ALISAUNDER m Scots, Medieval English, Literature
Scots form and medieval English variant of Alexander. 'King Alisaunder' or 'Kyng Alisaunder', dating from the end of the 13th century or the early 14th century, is a Middle English romance or romantic epic telling the story of Alexander the Great's career from his youth, through his successful campaigns against the Persian king Darius and other adversaries, his discovery of the wonders of the East, and his untimely death.
ALISOUN f Medieval English, Literature
Variant of Alison. This is the name of the Wife of Bath in Geoffrey Chaucer's 'The Canterbury Tales'.
ALIVA f Medieval English
Derived from Old English æþel "noble" and gifu "gift".
ALNUAR m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon element al meaning "noble" and unknown element nuar.
ALRIC m Medieval English
Combination of elements al meaning "noble" and ric "power, ruler."
ALSABELL f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Isabel via the variant Assabell.
ALSI m Medieval English
Combination of Anglo-Saxon element al "noble" and si.
ALSTAN m Medieval English
Medieval form of any of the Old English names Æðelstan, Ælfstan, Ealdstan or Ealhstan.
ALULF m Medieval English
Combination of al "noble" and ulf "wolf."
ALVEVA f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Ælfgifu.
ALWARD m Medieval English
Combination of elements al "noble" and ward "guard."
ALWULF m Medieval English
Combination of elements al "noble" and wulf "wolf."
AMALGAR m Medieval English
Combination of elements amal and gar "spear."
AMBI m Medieval English, Norwegian
Old Norse short form of Arnbjǫrn.
AMERIA f Medieval English
Of uncertain origin and meaning. Current theories include a feminine form of Old French Amauri (see Amaury).
AMERIE f Medieval English, English (Rare)
Late medieval variant of Ameria. It was revived in the 1800s.... [more]
AMIA f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinization of Amy via the variant Amya.
AMPHELISE f Medieval English
Possibly a compound of Amice and Felice. The name begins appearing in the late 1100s (attested in 1198) with the formal Latin version of Amphelisia and the vernacular version of Anflis.
AMYA f Medieval English
Quasi-Latinization of Amy.
ANCHORET f Medieval English
Early Anglicization of Welsh Angharad.
ANDRET m Arthurian Romance, Medieval English
King Mark's nephew and hostile cousin to Tristan.
ANGER m Medieval English
Meaning, "a strong feeling of annoyance, displeasure, or hostility." Referring to the wrath of God.
ANILLA f Medieval English
Contracted form of Anabilla.
ANKARETTE f English (British, Archaic), Medieval English
Medieval English form of Welsh Angharad (compare Anchoretta).
ANNOT f Medieval English, Medieval French
Medieval diminutive of Ann a short form of Annes (see Annis), Annora, and Alianora. It was used by Sir Walter Scott for a character in his short novel 'A Legend of Montrose' (1819). This name was a precursor to Annette.
ANSGER m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Ansgar.
ANSTICE f English (British, Rare), Medieval English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval given name Anastase or Anastayse (from Latin Anastasius), or from its feminine equivalent Anastasie (from Latin Anastasia).
ANUND m Medieval English, Medieval Scandinavian, Old Swedish, Old Danish
Old Swedish and Old Danish and also younger form of Anundr.
APE m Medieval English, Finnish
Finnish pet forms of Abram, Abraham, Abel, Albin, Arne, Amos, and Aron.
APPOLINE f Medieval English
Used in reference to St. Appoline.
ARABEL f Scottish, English (British), Medieval English
A variation of Orabel, a Latin construction which suffixes orare "prayer" with ābilis "able," thus interpretable as 'given to prayer' or "able to pray."
ARCHEL m Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Arnketil.
ARETIUS m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Aretias.
ARGENTINA f Spanish, Medieval English
From Argentina, the name of a country in South America. It is derived from the Latin argentum (silver), which in turn comes from the Ancient Greek ἀργήντος (argēntos), from ἀργήεις (argēeis), "white, shining"... [more]
ARNBRAND m Medieval English, Old Danish, Norwegian
Possibly from the elements arn "eagle" and brand "fire, swordblade."
ARNGRIM m Medieval English, Norse Mythology
Anglo-Scandinavian variant of Arngrímr. This was the name of a berserker in Norse mythology; he figures in Hervarar saga, Gesta Danorum, Lay of Hyndla, a number of Faroese ballads, and Örvar-Odds saga.
ARNOALD m History (Archaic), Medieval English (Archaic)
Variant of Arnold. Arnoald (ca. 540/560 – ca 611) was a Bishop of Metz between 601 and 609 or 611.
ASLI m Medieval English, Norwegian
Old Norse short form of ÁslæifR.
ASULF m Medieval English, Old Swedish, Old Danish
Old Swedish and Old Danish form of Ásulfr.
ATHELSTON m Medieval English, English (Rare), Literature
Medieval variant of Æthelstan, which is still in use today. In literature, this is the name of the eponymous character of the Middle English verse romance Athelston (14th century), the author of which is unknown.... [more]
ATKIN m Medieval English
Diminutive of Adam.
AUTI m Medieval English
Old Danish form of Autir.
AVELIN m & f Medieval English, English (Anglicized)
Diminutive of the Ancient Germanic names Avo and Avi (compare also Ava, Aveline and Evelyn). Also an aglicization of Éibhleann.
AVELYN f English (Modern, Rare), Medieval English
Variant of Aveline first used in medieval England and eventually revived in the 20th century.
AVENEL m Medieval English
Originally derived from the same, highly uncertain, source as Avo and Ava, Avenel was first in use as a given name in the Middle Ages, and later went on to become a surname (which, in turn, was occasionally re-used as a given name from the 1500s onwards).
AVILINA f Medieval English
Medieval variant of Avelina.
AWDRY f Medieval English
Possible precursor to Audrey?
AYLWIN m Medieval English
The meaning behind Aylwin is "Old Friend", it's an old Medieval English name.
AZO m Medieval English
Possibly related to Azzo.
AZUR m Medieval English, Biblical
Son of Eliakim, mentioned briefly in the Genealogy of Jesus in Matthew 1:13-14.
BAB f Medieval English
Diminutive of Barbara.
BALKI m Medieval English, Norwegian
From Old Norse balkr meaning "ridge of land."
BARBARY f Manx, Medieval English, English (Archaic)
English vernacular form and Manx regular form of Barbara.
BARBATA f Neapolitan, Medieval English
Feminine form of the Latin cognomen Barbatus.
BARDOLPH m Theatre, Medieval English (?)
Possibly from a Germanic name derived from the elements bard, meaning "small axe" or "beard", and wulf "wolf". Shakespeare used it for minor characters in several plays.
BARK m Medieval English, Old Swedish
Old Swedish form of Bǫrkr.
BARN m Medieval English
From Old Norse barn meaning "child."
BARNI m Medieval English, Old Danish
Derived from Old Norse barn "child".
BARSABE f Medieval English
Medieval English form of Bathsheba.
BARTELOT m Medieval English, English (Puritan)
Diminutive of Bartholomew. Precursor to the surname Bartlett.
BARTLET m Medieval English
Medieval diminutive of Bartholomew.
BASILIA f Spanish (Latin American), German (Rare), Medieval English, Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of Basil (1) via its latinized form Basilius. This was borne by an obscure early saint. As an English name it has long been obsolete, but was much used in the Middle Ages; perhaps a reference to Saint Veronica as Basilia in the medieval 'Mors Pilati' ('Death of Pilate') was responsible for the name's popularity.
BAT m English, Medieval English, English (Puritan)
Diminutive of Bartholomew. A famous bearer was Bat Masterson, famed sheriff of Dodge City, Kansas.
BEARD m Medieval English
Possible anglicization of Barth.
BEGILDA f Medieval English (Latinized)
Latinized form of Old English Béaghild.
BER m Medieval English, Ancient Germanic
Possible diminutive of ber- names. Also the germanic word for "bear."
BEREWOLD m Medieval English
From words beofor, meaning "beaver" and wold meaning "forest."
BERNER m Medieval English, Old Norman
From the Old Norman personal names Bernier or Brenier, a derivative of bren, bran "bran", on which the dogs were fed.
BERNWULF m Medieval English
Variant of Berowulf. Since the 11th century, his name has appeared as Bernwelf. It may also be spelled Berowolf or Bernulf.
BEROWULF m Medieval English, Ancient Germanic
Variant of Bernwulf, from Germanic bero "bear" and wulf "wolf."
BERTULPH m Medieval English
The name of a king of Mercia.
BESI m Medieval English, Norwegian, Old Swedish
Old Norse diminuitive of Bjorn.
BETHIA f Biblical Latin, Scottish, English, Medieval English
Form of Bithiah used in some versions of the Old Testament. This name was popular in Scotland from the 17th century as an Anglicised form of Gaelic Beathag. It is occasionally used as a Latinized form of Beth and in medieval England was a diminutive of Elizabeth.
BETHIAS f Medieval English
Medieval English variant of Bethiah.
BETRICE f Medieval English
Contracted form of Beatrice.
BIARNI m Medieval English, Old Danish
Old Norse and Old Danish variant of Biǫrn as well as short form of names containing the element Björn.
BIL f & m Norse Mythology, Old Swedish, Norwegian, Medieval English
Means "instant" in Old Norse. In Norse Mythology, Bil and her brother Hjúki follow Máni across the heavens.
BLAEC m Medieval English
Meaning "clear water."
BLANCARD m Medieval English
Possibly a variant of Blanchard.
BLAZE f & m Medieval English
Name used in reference to St. Blaze.