Names Categorized "alcohol"

This is a list of names in which the categories include alcohol.
gender
usage
Ale 2 m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element adal meaning "noble".
Amethyst f English (Rare)
From the name of the purple semi-precious stone, which is derived from the Greek negative prefix (a) and μέθυστος (methystos) meaning "intoxicated, drunk", as it was believed to be a remedy against drunkenness.
Bailey m & f English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
Brandy f English
From the English word brandy for the alcoholic drink. It is ultimately from Dutch brandewijn "burnt wine". It has been in use as a given name since the 1960s.
Brigid f Irish, Irish Mythology
Irish variant of Brighid (see Bridget).
Bud m English
Short form of Buddy.
Burgundy f English (Rare)
This name can refer either to the region in France, the wine (which derives from the name of the region), or the colour (which derives from the name of the wine).
Calixta f Spanish, Portuguese (Rare)
Spanish and Portuguese feminine form of Calixtus.
Calixte m French
French form of Calixtus.
Calixto m Spanish, Portuguese (Rare)
Spanish and Portuguese form of Calixtus.
Calixtus m Late Roman
Variant of Callistus, the spelling perhaps influenced by Latin calix "wine cup". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callistus).
Callixtus m Late Roman
Variant of Callistus, the spelling perhaps influenced by Latin calix "wine cup". This was the name of three popes (also known as Callistus).
Corona f Late Roman, Italian (Rare), Spanish (Rare)
Means "crown" in Latin, as well as Italian and Spanish. This was the name of a 2nd-century saint who was martyred with her companion Victor.
Dionysos m Greek Mythology
From Greek Διός (Dios) meaning "of Zeus" combined with Nysa, the name of the region where young Dionysos was said to have been raised. In Greek mythology Dionysos was the god of wine, revelry, fertility and dance. He was the son of Zeus and Semele.
Dom m English
Short form of Dominic.
Fíona f Irish
Derived from Irish fíon meaning "wine".
Heilyn m Welsh
Means "winebearer" in Welsh.
Jack m English
Derived from Jackin (earlier Jankin), a medieval diminutive of John. There could be some early influence from the unrelated French name Jacques. It is often regarded as an independent name. During the Middle Ages it was very common, and it became a slang word meaning "man". It was frequently used in fairy tales and nursery rhymes, such as Jack and the Beanstalk, Little Jack Horner, and Jack Sprat.... [more]
Jameson m English
From an English surname meaning "son of James".
Maeve f Irish, Irish Mythology
Anglicized form of the Gaelic name Medb meaning "intoxicating". In Irish legend this was the name of a warrior queen of Connacht. Her fight against Ulster and the hero Cúchulainn is told in the Irish epic The Cattle Raid of Cooley.
Margarita f Spanish, Russian, Bulgarian, Lithuanian, Latvian, Greek, Late Roman
Latinate form of Margaret. This is also the Spanish word for the daisy flower (species Bellis perennis, Leucanthemum vulgare and others).
Margaux f French
Variant of Margot influenced by the name of the wine-producing French town. It was borne by Margaux Hemingway (1954-1996), granddaughter of author Ernest Hemingway, who had it changed from Margot.
Meade m & f English (Rare)
From an English surname that indicated one who lived on a meadow (from Middle English mede) or one who sold or made mead (an alcoholic drink made from fermented honey; from Old English meodu).
Oenone f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Οἰνώνη (Oinone), derived from οἶνος (oinos) meaning "wine". In Greek mythology Oenone was a mountain nymph who was married to Paris before he went after Helen.
Oinone f Greek Mythology
Greek form of Oenone.
Šárka f Czech
Meaning unknown. In Czech legend Šárka was a maiden who joined other women in declaring war upon men. She tricked the men by having herself tied to a tree, and, after they came to her rescue, offering them mead laced with a sleeping potion. After the men fell asleep the other women slew them.
Sherry f English
Before the 20th century this was probably from the Irish surname Ó Searraigh meaning "descendant of Searrach" (a name meaning "foal" in Gaelic). Later it may have been reinforced by the French word chérie meaning "darling", or the English word sherry, a type of fortified wine named from the Spanish town of Jerez. This name came into popular use during the 1920s, inspired by other similar-sounding names and by Collette's novels Chéri (1920, English translation 1929) and The Last of Chéri (1926, English translation 1932), in which it is a masculine name.
Stella 1 f English, Italian, Dutch, German
Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets Astrophel and Stella. It was a nickname of a lover of Jonathan Swift, real name Esther Johnson (1681-1728), though it was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play A Streetcar Named Desire (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.
Svetka f Russian
Diminutive of Svetlana.
Tito m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Titus.
Vin m English
Short form of Vincent.
Vinicio m Italian, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of the Roman family name Vinicius, which was possibly derived from Latin vinum "wine".
Wamalwa m Eastern African, Luhya
Means "born during the brewing season" in Luhya.
Wine m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from Old English wine "friend".