Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the gender is feminine; and the relationship is from surname.
There are 88 names matching your criteria.

ADDISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of ADAM". Its recent popularity as a feminine name stems from its similarity in sound to Madison.
AINSLEY   f & m   Scottish, English (Modern)
From a surname which was from a place name: either Annesley in Nottinghamshire or Ansley in Warwickshire. The place names themselves derive from Old English anne "alone, solitary" or ansetl "hermitage" and leah "woodland, clearing".
ASHLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from place names meaning "ash tree clearing", from a combination of Old English æsc and leah... [more]
ASTON   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
AVERILL   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was originally derived from the feminine given name EOFORHILD.
AVERY   m & f   English
From a surname which was itself derived from the Norman French form of the given names ALBERICH or ALFRED.
BAILEY   m & f   English
From a surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.
BEVERLY   f & m   English
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English city, itself meaning "beaver stream" in Old English. It came into use as a masculine given name in the 19th century, and it became common as an American feminine name after the publication of George Barr McCutcheon's novel 'Beverly of Graustark' (1904).
BLAIR   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname which is derived from Gaelic blár meaning "plain, field, battlefield".
BRETT   m & f   English
From a Middle English surname meaning "a Breton", referring to an inhabitant of Brittany. A famous bearer is the American football quarterback Brett Favre (1969-).
BROOK   m & f   English
From an English surname which denoted one who lived near a brook.
BROOKE   f   English
Variant of BROOK. The name came into use in the 1950s, probably influenced by American socialite Brooke Astor (1902-2007)... [more]
CAMERON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname meaning "crooked nose" from Gaelic cam "crooked" and sròn "nose".
CAREY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Ciardha meaning "descendant of CIARDHA".
CARSON   m & f   Scottish, English
From a Scottish surname of unknown meaning. A famous bearer of the surname was the American scout Kit Carson (1809-1868).
CARY   m & f   English
Variant of CAREY.
CASEY   m & f   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cathasaigh meaning "descendant of CATHASACH". This name can be given in honour of Casey Jones (1863-1900), a train engineer who sacrificed his life to save his passengers... [more]
CASSIDY   f & m   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Caiside meaning "descendant of CAISIDE".
COURTNEY   f & m   English
From an aristocratic English surname which was derived either from the French place name Courtenay (originally a derivative of the personal name Curtenus, itself derived from Latin curtus "short") or else from a Norman nickname meaning "short nose"... [more]
DARBY   m & f   English
From an English surname, which was derived from the name of the town of Derby, meaning "deer town" in Old Norse.
DELANEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).
DEVIN   m & f   English, Irish
From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).
EMERSON   m & f   English
From an English surname meaning "son of EMERY". The surname was borne by Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), an American writer and philosopher who wrote about transcendentalism.
EVELYN   f & m   English, German
From an English surname which was derived from the given name AVELINE. In the 17th century when it was first used as a given name it was more common for boys, but it is now regarded as mainly feminine due to association with the related name Evelina.
GARNET (2)   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname which referred either to a person who made hinges (Old French carne) or who sold pomegranates (Old French pome grenate).
GARNETT   m & f   English
Variant of GARNET (2).
GORETTI   f   Various
From the surname of Maria Goretti, a 20th-century Italian saint who forgave her murderer on her deathbed. Her surname was derived from the given name GREGORIO.
GREER   f & m   Scottish, English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname which was derived from the given name GREGOR.
HARLEY   m & f   English
From a surname which was from a place name, itself derived from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HARLOW   f & m   English
From a surname which was from a place name which was derived from Old English hær "rock" or here "army", combined with hlaw "hill".
HARPER   f & m   English
From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-2016), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
HAYDEN   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".
HAYLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally derived from the name of an English town (meaning "hay clearing" from Old English heg "hay" and leah "clearing")... [more]
HUNTER   m & f   English
From an occupational English surname for a hunter, derived from Old English hunta. A famous bearer was the eccentric American journalist Hunter S. Thompson (1937-2005).
JEWEL   f & m   English
In part from the English word jewel, a precious stone, derived from Old French jouel, which was possibly related to jeu "game". It is also in part from the surname Jewel or Jewell (a derivative of the Breton name JUDICAËL), which was sometimes used in honour of the 16th-century bishop of Salisbury John Jewel... [more]
JEWELL   f & m   English
Variant of JEWEL.
KAUR   f   Indian (Sikh)
Means "princess" in Punjabi. This name is used as a surname or a middle name by most female Sikhs.
KEIGHLEY   f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from an English place name, ultimately meaning "clearing belonging to Cyhha". The Old English given name Cyhha is of unknown meaning... [more]
KELLY   m & f   Irish, English
Anglicized form of the Irish given name CEALLACH or the surname derived from it Ó Ceallaigh. As a surname, it has been borne by actor and dancer Gene Kelly (1912-1996) and actress and princess Grace Kelly (1929-1982).
KELSEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which is derived from town names in Lincolnshire. It may mean "Cenel's island", from the Old English name Cenel "fierce" in combination with eg "island".
KENDAL   m & f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was a variant of KENDALL.
KENDALL   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from the name of the city of Kendale in northwest England meaning "valley on the river Kent".
KENNEDY   f & m   English, Irish
From an irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cinnéidigh meaning "descendant of CENNÉTIG"... [more]
KINLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was an Anglicized form of Mac Fhionnlaigh meaning "son of FIONNLAGH".
KINSLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was derived from the given name CYNESIGE.
LACEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LACY.
LACY   f & m   English
From a surname which was derived from Lassy, the name of a town in Normandy. The name of the town was Gaulish in origin, perhaps deriving from a personal name which was Latinized as Lascius.
LEE   m & f   English
From a surname which was derived from Old English leah meaning "clearing". The surname belonged to Robert E. Lee (1807-1870), commander of the Confederate forces during the American Civil War... [more]
LEIGH   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of LEE.
LESLEY   f & m   English
Variant of LESLIE.
LESLIE   f & m   English
From a Scottish surname which was derived from a Scottish place name, probably derived from Gaelic leas celyn meaning "garden of holly". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century... [more]
LINDSAY   f & m   English, Scottish
From an English and Scottish surname which was originally derived from the name of the region Lindsey, which means "LINCOLN island" in Old English... [more]
LOGAN   m & f   Scottish, English
From a surname which was originally derived from a Scottish place name meaning "little hollow" in Scottish Gaelic.
MACKENZIE   f & m   English
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel... [more]
MACY   f   English
From an English surname which was from various towns named Massy in France. The towns themselves were originally named from a Gallo-Roman personal name that was Latinized as Maccius... [more]
MADISON   f & m   English
From an English surname meaning "son of MAUD". It was not commonly used as a feminine name until after the movie 'Splash' (1984), in which the main character adopted it as her name after seeing a street sign for Madison Avenue in New York City... [more]
MARLEY   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was taken from a place name meaning either "pleasant wood", "boundary wood" or "marten wood" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the Jamaican musician Bob Marley (1945-1981).
MCKENNA   f   English (Modern)
From the Gaelic surname Mac Cionaodha, which means "son of CIONAODH".
MONET   f & m   Various
From a French surname which was derived from either HAMON or EDMOND. This was the surname of the French impressionist painter Claude Monet (1840-1926).
MURPHY   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Murchadha meaning "descendant of MURCHADH".
PAGET   f   English (Rare)
From a surname which meant "little page" (see PAIGE).
PAIGE   f   English
From an English surname meaning "servant, page" in Middle English. It is ultimately derived (via Old French and Italian) from Greek παιδιον (paidion) meaning "little boy".
PARKER   m & f   English
From an English occupational surname which meant "keeper of the park".
PARRIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which originally denoted a person who came from the French city of Paris (see PARIS (2)).
PAYTON   f & m   English (Modern)
Variant of PEYTON.
PEYTON   m & f   English
From an English surname, originally a place name meaning "PÆGA's town". A famous bearer was Peyton Randolph (1721-1775), the first president of the Continental Congress... [more]
PIPER   f   English (Modern)
From a surname which was originally given to a person who played on a pipe (a flute). It was popularized as a given name by a character from the television series 'Charmed', which debuted in 1998.
PRESLEY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "priest clearing" (Old English preost and leah). This surname was borne by musician Elvis Presley (1935-1977).
QUINN   m & f   Irish, English
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Cuinn meaning "descendant of CONN".
REAGAN   f & m   English, Irish
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ríagáin meaning "descendant of RIAGÁN"... [more]
REILLY   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname which was derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
RILEY   m & f   English
From a surname which comes from two distinct sources. As an Irish surname it is a variant of REILLY. As an English surname it is derived from a place name meaning "rye clearing" in Old English.
ROWAN   m & f   Irish, English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendant of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.
SCARLETT   f   English
From a surname which denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, ultimately derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat))... [more]
SELBY   m & f   English (Rare)
From an English surname which was from a place name meaning "willow farm" in Old Norse.
SHELBY   m & f   English
From a surname, which was possibly a variant of SELBY. Though previously in use as a rare masculine name, it was popularized as a feminine name by the main character in the movie 'The Woman in Red' (1935)... [more]
SIDNEY   m & f   English
From the English surname SIDNEY. It was first used as a given name in honour of executed politician Algernon Sidney (1622-1683)... [more]
SLOAN   f   English (Rare)
Variant of SLOANE.
SLOANE   f   English (Rare)
From an Irish surname which was derived from an Anglicized form of the given name SLUAGHADHÁN.
STACEY   f & m   English
Variant of STACY.
STACY   f & m   English
Either a diminutive of ANASTASIA, or else from a surname which was derived from Stace, a medieval form of EUSTACE... [more]
SYDNEY   f & m   English
From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788... [more]
TAYLOR   m & f   English
From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).
TEAGAN   m & f   English (Modern)
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Tadhgáin meaning "descendant of Tadhgán". The given name Tadhgán is a diminutive of TADHG.
TERRY (1)   m & f   English
From an English surname which was derived from the medieval name Thierry, a Norman French form of THEODORIC.
TIERNEY   m & f   Irish, English (Rare)
Anglicized form of TIGHEARNACH. In part, it is from a surname derived from the given name.
TRACY   f & m   English
From an English surname which was taken from a Norman French place name meaning "domain belonging to THRACIUS". Charles Dickens used it for a male character in his novel 'The Pickwick Papers' (1837)... [more]
WALLIS   m & f   English (Rare)
From a surname which was a variant of WALLACE. Wallis Simpson (1895-1986) was the divorced woman whom Edward VIII married, which forced him to abdicate the British throne.
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