Names Categorized "elven folk"

This is a list of names in which the categories include elven folk.
gender
usage
Aafje f Dutch
Short form of names beginning with the Old German element alb "elf".
Ælfflæd f Anglo-Saxon
Old English name composed of the elements ælf "elf" and flæd, possibly meaning "beauty".
Ælfgar m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Algar.
Ælfgifu f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and giefu "gift". This was the name of the first wife of the English king Æðelræd II.
Ælfheah m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
Ælfnoð m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with noð "boldness, daring".
Ælfric m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and ric "ruler, king" (making it a cognate of Alberich). This was the name of a 10th-century archbishop of Canterbury, sometimes considered a saint.
Ælfsige m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and sige "victory".
Ælfstan m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and stan "stone".
Ælfswiþ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English element ælf "elf" combined with swiþ "strong".
Ælfþryð f Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Elfreda.
Ælfthryth f Anglo-Saxon
Variant of Ælfþryð (see Elfreda).
Ælfweard m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weard "guardian".
Ælfwig m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wig "war, battle".
Ælfwine m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wine "friend". This name was not commonly used after the Norman Conquest.
Ælfwynn f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and wynn "joy". This name was borne by a daughter of Æðelflæd who ruled Mercia briefly in the 10th century.
Ailill m Old Irish, Irish Mythology
Means "elf" in Irish. This name was borne by several early Irish kings. It also occurs frequently in Irish legend, borne for example by the husband of Queen Medb.
Alba 1 f Italian, Spanish, Catalan
This name is derived from two distinct names, Alba 2 and Alba 3, with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.
Alba 3 f Germanic
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element alb meaning "elf" (Proto-Germanic *albaz).
Alberich m Germanic, Germanic Mythology
Derived from the Old German elements alb "elf" and rih "ruler, king". It was borne by two Lombard dukes of Spoleto in the 10th century. It was also the name of a 12th-century French saint who helped found the Cistercian Order.... [more]
Alberico m Italian
Italian form of Alberich.
Alboin m Germanic
From the Old German elements alb "elf" and wini "friend". It is a cognate of Ælfwine. This was the name of a 6th-century king of the Lombards who began the Lombard conquest of Italy.
Alf 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse alfr meaning "elf". In Norse legend this was the name of king, the suitor of a reluctant maiden named Alfhild. She avoided marrying him by disguising herself as a warrior, but when they fought she was so impressed by his strength that she changed her mind.
Alf 2 m English
Short form of Alfred.
Alfarr m Old Norse
Old Norse form of Alvar.
Alfbern m Germanic
Derived from the Old German elements alb "elf" and bern "bear".
Alfhard m Germanic
Old German name composed of the elements alb "elf" and hart "hard, firm, brave, hardy".
Alfher m Germanic
Old German name composed of the elements alb "elf" and heri "army" (making it a cognate of Alvar).
Alfhild f Norwegian, Swedish
From the Old Norse name Alfhildr, which was composed of the elements alfr "elf" and hildr "battle". In Scandinavian legend Alfhild was a maiden who disguised herself as a warrior in order to avoid marriage to King Alf. Her life was perhaps based on that of a 9th-century Viking pirate.
Alfhildr f Old Norse
Old Norse form of Alfhild.
Alfie m English
Diminutive of Alfred.
Alfr m Norse Mythology
Old Norse form of Alf 1.
Alfred m English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Polish, Dutch, Albanian
Means "elf counsel", derived from the Old English name Ælfræd, composed of the elements ælf "elf" and ræd "counsel, advice". Alfred the Great was a 9th-century king of Wessex who fought unceasingly against the Danes living in northeast England. He was also a scholar, and he translated many Latin books into Old English. His fame helped to ensure the usage of this name even after the Norman Conquest, when most Old English names were replaced by Norman ones. It became rare by the end of the Middle Ages, but was revived in the 18th century.... [more]
Alfredo m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of Alfred.
Alfvin m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and vinr "friend". It is a cognate of Ælfwine.
Alfwin m Germanic
Variant of Alboin.
Algar m English (Rare)
Means "elf spear" from Old English ælf "elf" and gar "spear". This Old English name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest, being absorbed by similar-sounding names and Norman and Scandinavian cognates. It was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Algautr m Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements alfr meaning "elf" and gautr meaning "Geat" (a North Germanic tribe).
Alger m English
From a surname that was derived from the given name Algar.
Algot m Swedish
Swedish form of Algautr.
Alphege m History (Ecclesiastical)
Middle English form of Ælfheah.
Alv m Norwegian
Variant of Alf 1.
Alva 1 f Swedish, Norwegian
Feminine form of Alf 1.
Alvar m Swedish, Estonian
From the Old Norse name Alfarr, formed of the elements alfr "elf" and herr "army, warrior".
Alvena f English
Feminine form of Alvin.
Alvilda f Danish (Rare)
Danish form of Alfhild.
Alvilde f Norwegian (Rare)
Norwegian form of Alfhild.
Alvin m English, Swedish
From a medieval form of any of the Old English names Ælfwine, Æðelwine or Ealdwine. It was revived in the 19th century, in part from a surname that was derived from the Old English names. As a Scandinavian name it is derived from Alfvin, an Old Norse cognate of Ælfwine.
Alvina f English
Feminine form of Alvin.
Alwin m German, Dutch, Germanic
Contracted form of Adalwin.
Alwine f German (Rare)
Feminine form of Alwin.
Arwen f Literature
Means "noble maiden" in the fictional language Sindarin. In The Lord of the Rings (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.
Auberon m Literature
From a diminutive form of Auberi, an Old French form of Alberich. It is the name of the fairy king in the 13th-century epic Huon de Bordeaux.
Aubrey m & f English
From Auberi, an Old French form of Alberich brought to England by the Normans. It was common in the Middle Ages, and was revived in the 19th century. Since the mid-1970s it has more frequently been given to girls, due to Bread's 1972 song Aubrey along with its similarity to the established feminine name Audrey.
Elba f Spanish
Possibly a Spanish variant form of Alba 3.
Elfa f Icelandic
Feminine form of Alf 1.
Elfleda f English (Archaic)
Middle English form of both the Old English names Æðelflæd and Ælfflæd. These names became rare after the Norman Conquest, but Elfleda was briefly revived in the 19th century.
Elfreda f English
Middle English form of the Old English name Ælfþryð meaning "elf strength", derived from the element ælf "elf" combined with þryþ "strength". Ælfþryð was common amongst Anglo-Saxon nobility, being borne for example by the mother of King Æðelræd the Unready. This name was rare after the Norman Conquest, but it was revived in the 19th century.
Elfrieda f English
Variant of Elfreda.
Elfriede f German
German form of Elfreda.
Ellington f & m English (Rare)
Derived from the English surname Ellington.
Elric m Medieval English
Middle English form of either of the Old English names Ælfric or Æðelric. Both were rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
Elva 2 f Danish, Icelandic
Feminine form of Alf 1.
Elvar m Icelandic
Icelandic form of Alvar.
Elvin 1 m English
Variant of Alvin.
Elvina f English
Variant of Alvina.
Elvis m English
Meaning unknown. It could possibly be a derivative of Alvis or Elwin. More likely, it is from the rare surname Elvis, a variant of Elwes, which is ultimately derived from the given name Eloise. The name was brought to public attention by the singer Elvis Presley (1935-1977), whose name came from his father's middle name.... [more]
Elwin m English
Variant of Alvin.
Elwyn m English
Variant of Alvin.
Gandalf m Norse Mythology, Literature
Means "wand elf" in Old Norse, from the elements gandr "wand, staff, magic, monster" and alfr "elf". This name belongs to a dwarf (Gandálfr) in the Völuspá, a 13th-century Scandinavian manuscript that forms part of the Poetic Edda. The author J. R. R. Tolkien borrowed the name for a wizard in his novels The Hobbit (1937) and The Lord of the Rings (1954).
Keijo m Finnish
Derived from Finnish keiju meaning "elf, fairy".
Oliver m English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Catalan, Serbian, Croatian, Macedonian, Czech, Slovak
From Old French Olivier, possibly derived from a Germanic name, perhaps Old Norse Áleifr (see Olaf) or Frankish Alawar (see Álvaro). The spelling was altered by association with Latin oliva "olive tree". In the Middle Ages the name became well-known in Western Europe because of the French epic La Chanson de Roland, in which Olivier was a friend and advisor of the hero Roland.... [more]
Olivette f Literature
Feminine form of Oliver. This was the name of the title character in the French opera Les noces d'Olivette (1879) by Edmond Audran.
Olivia f English, Italian, Spanish, French, German, Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
This name was used in this spelling by William Shakespeare for a character in his comedy Twelfth Night (1602). This was a rare name in Shakespeare's time that may have been based on Oliva or Oliver, or directly from the Latin word oliva meaning "olive". In the play Olivia is a noblewoman who is wooed by Duke Orsino but instead falls in love with his messenger Cesario, who is actually Viola in disguise.... [more]
Síofra f Irish
Means "elf, sprite" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Tinúviel f Literature
Means "daughter of twilight, nightingale" in the fictional language Sindarin. In the Silmarillion (1977) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Tinuviel was another name of Lúthien, the daughter of Thingol the elf king. She was the beloved of Beren, who with her help retrieved one of the Silmarils from the iron crown of Morgoth.
Vilde 1 f Norwegian
Short form of Alvilde.