erinn's Personal Name List

Ádhamh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AHV, OW
Irish form of Adam.
Aidan
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: AY-dən(English)
Anglicized form of Aodhán. In the latter part of the 20th century it became popular in America due to its sound, since it shares a sound with such names as Braden and Hayden. It peaked ranked 39th for boys in 2003.
Ailís
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AY-leesh
Irish form of Alice.
Aindréas
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: AHN-dray-as
Irish form of Andrew.
Áine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: A-nyə(Irish)
Means "radiance, brilliance" in Irish. This was the name of a goddess of love and fertility in Irish legend, thought to dwell at the hill of Cnoc Áine in Limerick. It has sometimes been Anglicized as Anne.
Alannah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə(English)
Variant of Alana. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".
Alastar
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: A-lə-stər
Irish form of Alexander.
Alastríona
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: al-as-TREE-na
Feminine form of Alastar.
Anna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Armenian, Icelandic, Faroese, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Scottish Gaelic, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek
Other Scripts: Άννα(Greek) Анна(Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Bulgarian, Church Slavic) Աննա(Armenian) Ἄννα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: AN-ə(English) AN-na(Italian, Polish, Icelandic) A-na(German, Swedish, Danish, Greek, Czech) AH-na(Dutch) AHN-na(Norwegian) AHN-nah(Finnish) AWN-naw(Hungarian) AN-nə(Russian, Catalan)
Form of Channah (see Hannah) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah. It was a popular name in the Byzantine Empire from an early date, and in the Middle Ages it became common among Western Christians due to veneration of Saint Anna (usually known as Saint Anne in English), the name traditionally assigned to the mother of the Virgin Mary.

In England, this Latin form has been used alongside the vernacular forms Ann and Anne since the late Middle Ages. Anna is currently the most common of these spellings in all English-speaking countries (since the 1970s), however the biblical form Hannah is presently more popular than all three.

The name was borne by several Russian royals, including an 18th-century empress of Russia. It is also the name of the main character in Leo Tolstoy's novel Anna Karenina (1877), about a married aristocrat who begins an ultimately tragic relationship with Count Vronsky.

Anraí
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Irish form of Henry.
Aodh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Scottish Gaelic, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: AY(Irish) EE(Irish) UGH(Scottish) U(Scottish)
From Old Irish Áed, which meant "fire". This was a very popular name in early Ireland, being borne by numerous figures in Irish mythology and several high kings. It has been traditionally Anglicized as Hugh.
Aodhán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
From the Old Irish name Áedán meaning "little fire", a diminutive of Áed (see Aodh). This name was borne by a 6th-century king of Dál Riata. It was also the name of a few early Irish saints, including a 6th-century bishop of Ferns and a 7th-century bishop of Lindisfarne.
Aoibhe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EE-va
Variant of Aoife.
Aoibheann
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EE-vyən
From Old Irish Oébfinn or Aíbinn, derived from oíb meaning "beauty, appearance, form" and finn meaning "fair, white". This was the name of the mother of Saint Énna of Aran. It was also borne by the daughter of the 10th-century Irish high king Donnchad Donn.
Aoife
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: EE-fyə(Irish)
From Old Irish Aífe, derived from oíph meaning "beauty" (modern Irish aoibh). This was the name of several characters in Irish legend, including a woman at war with Scáthach (her sister in some versions). She was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn, who spared her life on the condition that she bear him a child (Connla). Another legendary figure by this name appears in the Children of Lir as the jealous third wife of Lir.

This name is sometimes Anglicized as Eve or Eva.

Aran 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish
From the name of the Aran Islands off the west coast of Ireland.
Ardghal
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Pronounced: AHR-dahl
Means "high valour", derived from the Old Irish elements ard "high" and gal "valour".
Bébhionn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Pronounced: BYEH-vyin, BYEH-vyeen
Variant of Bébinn.
Bébinn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Old Irish [1], Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BYEH-vyin(Irish) BYEH-vyeen(Irish)
Means "fair woman", from Old Irish "woman" and finn "fair, white". This name was borne by several characters in Irish mythology, including the mother of the hero Fráech.
Bedelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Irish diminutive of Bridget.
Bevin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish (Rare)
Anglicized form of Bébinn.
Biddy
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English
Pronounced: BID-ee(English)
Diminutive of Bridget.
Bidelia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Diminutive of Bridget.
Braden
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAY-dən
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Bradáin, which was in turn derived from the byname Bradán. Like other similar-sounding names such as Hayden and Aidan, it and its variant Brayden became popular in America at the end of the 20th century.
Brady
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BRAY-dee
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Brádaigh, itself derived from the byname Brádach. A famous bearer of the surname is American football quarterback Tom Brady (1977-). It was also borne by a fictional family on the television series The Brady Bunch (1969-1974).
Bran 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: BRAN(Irish)
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran mac Febail was a mariner who was involved in several adventures on his quest to find the Otherworld.
Breandán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Irish Gaelic form of Brendan.
Rose
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: ROZ
Originally a Norman form of the Germanic name Hrodohaidis meaning "famous type", composed of the elements hrod "fame" and heid "kind, sort, type". The Normans introduced it to England in the forms Roese and Rohese. From an early date it was associated with the word for the fragrant flower rose (derived from Latin rosa). When the name was revived in the 19th century, it was probably with the flower in mind.
Teague
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: TAYG(English) TEEG(English)
Anglicized form of Tadhg. This name is also used as a slang term for an Irish Catholic.
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