Hola123's Personal Name List

ADA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Polish, Hungarian, Italian, Finnish

Pronounced: AY-də (English), AH-dah (Polish, Finnish)

Rating: 59% based on 24 votes

Short form of ADELAIDE and other names beginning with the same sound. This name was borne by Augusta Ada King (1815-1852), the Countess of Lovelace (known as Ada Lovelace), a daughter of Lord Byron. She was an assistant to Charles Babbage, the inventor of an early mechanical computer.

ADELAIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Ancient Germanic

Rating: 49% based on 24 votes

Shortened form of ADALHEIDIS

ADERYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 38% based on 22 votes

Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.

ADRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Romanian, Polish, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Russian

Other Scripts: Адриан (Russian)

Pronounced: AY-dree-ən (English), AHD-ryahn (Polish), AH-dree-ahn (German), ah-dree-AHN (Russian)

Rating: 59% based on 22 votes

Form of Hadrianus (see HADRIAN). Several saints and six popes have borne this name, including the only English pope, Adrian IV, and the only Dutch pope, Adrian VI. As an English name, it has been in use since the Middle Ages, though it was not popular until modern times.

ADRIENNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French

Pronounced: ad-ree-EN

Rating: 50% based on 24 votes

French feminine form of ADRIAN

AGNES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Slovene, Ancient Greek (Latinized)

Other Scripts: ‘Αγνη (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: AG-nəs (English), AHK-nes (German), AHKH-nəs (Dutch), AHNG-nes (Swedish)

Rating: 53% based on 23 votes

Latinized form of the Greek name ‘Αγνη (Hagne), derived from Greek ‘αγνος (hagnos) meaning "chaste". Saint Agnes was a virgin martyred during the persecutions of the Roman emperor Diocletian. The name became associated with Latin agnus "lamb", resulting in the saint's frequent depiction with a lamb by her side. Due to her renown, the name became common in Christian Europe, being especially popular in England in the Middle Ages.

ALAINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: ə-LAYN-ə

Rating: 39% based on 23 votes

Variant of of ALANA, probably influenced by ELAINE.

ALBA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Catalan

Pronounced: AHL-bah (Italian, Spanish), AHL-bə (Catalan)

Rating: 35% based on 10 votes

This name is derived from two distinct names, ALBA (2) and ALBA (3), with distinct origins, Latin and Germanic. Over time these names have become confused with one another. To further complicate the matter, alba means "dawn" in Italian, Spanish and Catalan. This may be the main inspiration behind its use in Italy and Spain.

ALEC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AL-ək

Rating: 47% based on 23 votes

Short form of ALEXANDER

ALEXANDRA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, French, English, Greek, Portuguese, Romanian, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, Spanish, Russian, Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Αλεξανδρα (Greek), Александра (Russian)

Pronounced: ah-lek-SAHN-drah (German, Romanian), ah-lək-SAHN-drah (Dutch), al-əg-ZAN-drə (English), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Portuguese), ə-lə-SHAN-drə (Brazilian Portuguese)

Rating: 54% based on 26 votes

Feminine form of ALEXANDER. In Greek mythology this was a Mycenaean epithet of the goddess Hera, and an alternate name of Cassandra. It was borne by several early Christian saints, and also by the wife of Nicholas II, the last czar of Russia. She was from Germany and had the birth name Alix, but was renamed Александра (Aleksandra) upon joining the Russian Church.

ALVINA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: al-VEEN-ə

Rating: 35% based on 23 votes

Feminine form of ALVIN

AMADEUS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Late Roman

Pronounced: ahm-ə-DAY-əs (English), ahm-ə-DEE-əs (English)

Rating: 49% based on 21 votes

Means "love of God", derived from Latin amare "to love" and Deus "God". A famous bearer was the Austrian composer Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791), who was actually born Wolfgang Theophilus Mozart but preferred the Latin translation of his Greek middle name. This name was also assumed as a middle name by the German novelist E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822), who took it in honour of Mozart.

AMBROSE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AM-broz

Rating: 48% based on 10 votes

From the Late Latin name Ambrosius, which was derived from the Greek name Αμβροσιος (Ambrosios) meaning "immortal". Saint Ambrose was a 4th-century theologian and bishop of Milan, who is considered a Doctor of the Church. Due to the saint, the name came into general use in Christian Europe, though it was never particularly common in England.

ANTHONY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AN-thə-nee, AN-tə-nee

Rating: 49% based on 22 votes

English form of the Roman family name Antonius, which is of unknown Etruscan origin. The most notable member of the Roman family was the general Marcus Antonius (called Mark Antony in English), who for a period in the 1st century BC ruled the Roman Empire jointly with Augustus. When their relationship turned sour, he and his mistress Cleopatra were attacked and forced to commit suicide, as related in Shakespeare's tragedy 'Antony and Cleopatra' (1606).

The name became regularly used in the Christian world due to the fame of Saint Anthony the Great, a 4th-century Egyptian hermit who founded Christian monasticism. Its popularity was reinforced in the Middle Ages by the 13th-century Saint Anthony of Padua, the patron saint of Portugal. It has been commonly (but incorrectly) associated with Greek ανθος (anthos) "flower", which resulted in the addition of the h to this spelling in the 17th century.

ARDEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHR-dən

Rating: 32% based on 22 votes

From an English surname, originally taken from various place names, which were derived from a Celtic word meaning "high".

ARWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Literature

Rating: 47% based on 21 votes

Means "noble maiden" in Sindarin. In 'The Lord of the Rings' (1954) by J. R. R. Tolkien, Arwen was the daughter of Elrond and the lover of Aragorn.

ASHER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Hebrew, English, Biblical, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: אָשֵׁר (Hebrew)

Pronounced: A-shər (English)

Rating: 48% based on 22 votes

Means "happy" or "blessed" in Hebrew. Asher in the Old Testament is a son of Jacob and Leah's handmaid Zilpah, and the ancestor of one of the twelve tribes of Israel.

AVELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: av-ə-LEEN

Rating: 42% based on 21 votes

From the Norman French form of the Germanic name Avelina, a diminutive of AVILA. The Normans introduced this name to Britain. After the Middle Ages it became rare as an English name, though it persisted in America until the 19th century.

BEATRICE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, English, Swedish

Pronounced: be-ah-TREE-che (Italian), BEE-ə-tris (English), BEE-tris (English), BE-ah-trees (Swedish), be-ah-TREES (Swedish)

Rating: 58% based on 23 votes

Italian form of BEATRIX. Beatrice Portinari was the woman who was loved by the Italian poet Dante Alighieri. She served as Dante's guide through paradise in his epic poem 'The Divine Comedy' (1321). This was also the name of a character in Shakespeare's play 'Much Ado About Nothing' (1599).

BELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BEL-ə

Rating: 34% based on 22 votes

Short form of ISABELLA and other names ending in bella. It is also associated with the Italian word bella meaning "beautiful".

BENTLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: BENT-lee

Rating: 23% based on 9 votes

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "clearing covered with bent grass" in Old English. Various places in England bear this name.

BERLIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Various

Rating: 25% based on 22 votes

From the name of the city in Germany, which is of uncertain meaning.

BETRYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: BET-rees

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Welsh form of BEATRICE

BEVIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 29% based on 21 votes

Anglicized form of BÉBINN

BRONWYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 49% based on 25 votes

Variant of BRONWEN

BROOKLYN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: BRUWK-lin

Rating: 25% based on 23 votes

From the name of the borough of New York City, originally derived from Dutch Breukelen meaning "broken land". It can also be viewed as a combination of BROOK and the popular name suffix lyn.

BRYNN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: BRIN

Rating: 44% based on 24 votes

Feminine variant of BRYN

CADE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAYD

Rating: 37% based on 18 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a nickname meaning "round" in Old English.

CALLIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KAL-ee

Rating: 41% based on 22 votes

Diminutive of CAROLINE, or sometimes of names beginning with Cal.

CALLUM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Scottish

Pronounced: KAL-um

Rating: 66% based on 20 votes

Variant of CALUM

CAMDEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: KAM-dən

Rating: 32% based on 18 votes

From a surname which was from a place name perhaps meaning "enclosed valley" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English historian William Camden (1551-1623).

CAMILA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: kah-MEE-lah (Spanish)

Rating: 46% based on 22 votes

Spanish and Portuguese form of CAMILLA

CASH

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KASH

Rating: 19% based on 21 votes

From an English occupational surname for a box maker, derived from Norman French casse meaning "case". A famous bearer of the surname was American musician Johnny Cash (1932-2003).

CERRIDWEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 30% based on 21 votes

Variant of CERIDWEN

CERYS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 36% based on 21 votes

Variant of CARYS

CHANNING

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: CHAN-ing

Rating: 26% based on 24 votes

From an English surname of uncertain origin.

CHARLOTTA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish

Rating: 46% based on 20 votes

Swedish variant of CHARLOTTE

CLAIRE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English

Pronounced: KLER

Rating: 64% based on 20 votes

French form of CLARA

CONRÍ

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Rating: 33% based on 19 votes

Means "wolf king" in Irish Gaelic.

CONSTANTINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: KAHN-stən-teen (English)

Rating: 55% based on 2 votes

From the Latin name Constantinus, a derivative of CONSTANS. Constantine the Great (272-337) was the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. He moved the capital of the empire from Rome to Byzantium, which he renamed Constantinople (modern Istanbul).

DELANEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: də-LAYN-ee

Rating: 43% based on 22 votes

From a surname: either the English surname DELANEY (1) or the Irish surname DELANEY (2).

DELILAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical, Biblical Hebrew, English

Other Scripts: דְּלִילָה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: di-LIE-lə (English)

Rating: 56% based on 20 votes

Means "delicate, weak, languishing" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament she is the lover of Samson, whom she betrays to the Philistines by cutting his hair, which is the source of his power. Despite her character flaws, the name began to be used by the Puritans in the 17th century. It has been used occasionally in the English-speaking world since that time.

DEVIN

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: DEV-in

Rating: 34% based on 19 votes

From a surname, either the Irish surname DEVIN (1) or the English surname DEVIN (2).

DIMITRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Russian, French

Other Scripts: Димитрий (Russian)

Pronounced: dee-MEE-tree (Russian)

Rating: 70% based on 22 votes

Variant of DMITRIY, using the Church Slavic spelling.

DREW

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: DROO

Rating: 32% based on 19 votes

Short form of ANDREW

EAVAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: EE-van

Rating: 25% based on 19 votes

Anglicized form of AOIBHEANN

EBBA (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Rating: 29% based on 20 votes

From the Old English name Æbbe, meaning unknown, perhaps a contracted form of a longer name. Saint Ebba was a 7th-century daughter of king Æthelfrith of Bernicia and the founder of monasteries in Scotland. Another saint Ebba was a 9th-century abbess and martyr who mutilated her own face so that she would not be raped by the invading Danes.

EDEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Hebrew, English (Modern)

Other Scripts: עֵדֶן (Hebrew)

Pronounced: EE-dən (English)

Rating: 33% based on 19 votes

Means "place of pleasure" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament the Garden of Eden is the place where the first people, Adam and Eve, live before they are expelled.

EIRA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 59% based on 20 votes

Means "snow" in Welsh.

ELI (1)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Hebrew, Biblical, Biblical Greek, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עֵלִי (Hebrew), Ηλι (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: EE-lie (English)

Rating: 60% based on 10 votes

Means "ascension" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is the high priest of Israel and the teacher of Samuel. In England, Eli has been used as a Christian given name since the Protestant Reformation.

ELIN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Welsh

Pronounced: E-lin (Swedish, Norwegian)

Rating: 32% based on 20 votes

Scandinavian and Welsh form of HELEN

ELINOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ə-nawr

Rating: 63% based on 23 votes

Variant of ELEANOR

ELLIOT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EL-ee-ət

Rating: 57% based on 20 votes

From a surname which was a variant of ELLIOTT.

EMMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, French, Italian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: EM-ə (English), EM-mah (Finnish), E-mah (German)

Rating: 60% based on 23 votes

Originally a short form of Germanic names that began with the element ermen meaning "whole" or "universal". It was introduced to England by Emma of Normandy, who was the wife both of king Ethelred II (and by him the mother of Edward the Confessor) and later of king Canute. It was also borne by an 11th-century Austrian saint, who is sometimes called Hemma.

After the Norman conquest this name became common in England. It was revived in the 18th century, perhaps in part due to Matthew Prior's poem 'Henry and Emma' (1709). It was also used by Jane Austen for the central character, the matchmaker Emma Woodhouse, in her novel 'Emma' (1816).

ENYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: EN-ya

Rating: 46% based on 20 votes

Anglicized form of EITHNE

ESMERALDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature

Pronounced: es-me-RAHL-dah (Spanish), esh-mə-RAL-də (Portuguese), ez-mə-RAHL-də (English)

Rating: 48% based on 20 votes

Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.

ESPERANZA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: es-pe-RAHN-thah (Spanish), es-pe-RAHN-sah (Latin American Spanish)

Rating: 35% based on 18 votes

Spanish form of the Late Latin name Sperantia which was derived from sperare "to hope".

ESTELA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Portuguese, Spanish

Rating: 40% based on 20 votes

Portuguese and Spanish form of ESTELLE

EVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovene, Bulgarian, Croatian, Macedonian, Russian, Georgian, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: Ева (Bulgarian, Macedonian, Russian, Church Slavic), ევა (Georgian)

Pronounced: E-vah (Italian, Spanish, Danish), EE-və (English), E-fah (German), AY-vah (Dutch)

Rating: 50% based on 23 votes

Latinate form of EVE. This form is used in the Latin translation of the New Testament, while Hava is used in the Latin Old Testament. It is also a variant transcription of Russian YEVA. This name appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) belonging to the character Little Eva, whose real name is in fact Evangeline.

EVAN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh, English

Pronounced: EV-ən (English)

Rating: 27% based on 21 votes

Anglicized form of Iefan, a Welsh form of JOHN.

EVANGELINE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ə-VAN-jə-leen

Rating: 54% based on 21 votes

Means "good news" from Greek ευ "good" and αγγελμα (angelma) "news, message". It was (first?) used by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow in his epic poem 'Evangeline' (1847). It also appears in Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' (1852) as the full name of the character Eva.

EVIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: EE-vee, EV-ee

Rating: 42% based on 20 votes

Diminutive of EVE or EVELYN

EVREN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Turkish

Rating: 36% based on 18 votes

Means "cosmos, the universe" in Turkish.

FATIMA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic

Other Scripts: فاطمة (Arabic)

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

Variant transcription of FATIMAH

FIONA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English

Pronounced: fee-O-nə

Rating: 63% based on 4 votes

Feminine form of FIONN. This name was (first?) used by Scottish poet James Macpherson in his poem 'Fingal' (1762).

GEORGIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Greek

Other Scripts: Γεωργια (Greek)

Pronounced: JOR-jə (English)

Rating: 58% based on 20 votes

Latinate feminine form of GEORGE. This is the name of an American state, which was named after the British king George II. A famous bearer was the American painter Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986).

GRACE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: GRAYS

Rating: 51% based on 21 votes

From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.

GRIER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: GREER

Rating: 33% based on 4 votes

From a surname which was a variant of GREER.

GUINEVERE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arthurian Romance

Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir (English)

Rating: 58% based on 21 votes

From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, composed of the elements gwen meaning "fair, white" and hwyfar meaning "smooth". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GWENDOLEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: GWEN-də-lin (English)

Rating: 46% based on 21 votes

Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen "white, fair, blessed" and dolen "ring". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.

GWENYTH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: GWEN-ith (English)

Rating: 47% based on 20 votes

Variant of GWYNETH

HADRIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: History

Pronounced: HAY-dree-ən (English)

Rating: 57% based on 19 votes

From the Roman cognomen Hadrianus, which meant "from Hadria" in Latin. Hadria was a town in northern Italy (it gave its name to the Adriatic Sea). A famous bearer of the name was Publius Aelius Hadrianus, better known as Hadrian, a 2nd-century Roman emperor who built a wall across northern Britain.

HALLE (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: HAL-ee

Rating: 31% based on 21 votes

In the case of American actress Halle Berry (1966-), it is from the name of a department store in Cleveland where she was born (the store was founded by brothers bearing the German surname Halle, a cognate of HALL).

HARPER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAHR-pər

Rating: 42% based on 22 votes

From an Old English surname which originally belonged to a person who played the harp or who made harps. A notable bearer was the American author Harper Lee (1926-), who wrote 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.

HAYDEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAY-dən

Rating: 38% based on 20 votes

From an English surname which was derived from place names meaning either "hay valley" or "hay hill", derived from Old English heg "hay" and denu "valley" or dun "hill".

HOLLY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HAHL-ee

Rating: 51% based on 19 votes

From the English word for the holly tree, ultimately derived from Old English holen.

HUDSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: HUD-sən

Rating: 35% based on 18 votes

From an English surname which meant "son of HUDDE". A famous bearer of the surname was the English explorer Henry Hudson (1570-1611).

HUGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan, English, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)

Pronounced: OO-go (Spanish), HYOO-go (English), HUY-kho (Dutch), HOO-go (German)

Rating: 57% based on 17 votes

Latinized form of HUGH. As a surname it has belonged to the French author Victor Hugo (1802-1885), the writer of 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' and 'Les Misérables'.

IDRIS (2)

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Rating: 30% based on 2 votes

Means "ardent lord" from Welsh udd "lord, prince" combined with ris "ardent, enthusiastic, impulsive".

IMOGEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (British)

Pronounced: IM-ə-jən

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

The name of a princess in the play 'Cymbeline' (1609) by Shakespeare. He based her on a legendary character named Innogen, but the name was printed incorrectly and never corrected. The name Innogen is probably derived from Gaelic inghean meaning "maiden".

INDIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: IN-dee-ə

Rating: 13% based on 3 votes

From the name of the country, which is itself derived from the name of the Indus River. The river's name is ultimately from Sanskrit सिन्धु (Sindhu) meaning "body of trembling water, river".

INDIANA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: in-dee-AN-ə

Rating: 27% based on 19 votes

From the name of the American state, which means "land of the Indians". This is the name of the hero in the 'Indiana Jones' series of movies, starring Harrison Ford.

INÉS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish

Pronounced: ee-NES

Rating: 29% based on 19 votes

Spanish form of AGNES

INGRID

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German

Pronounced: ING-rid (Swedish), ING-ree (Norwegian), ING-grit (German)

Rating: 3% based on 3 votes

From the Old Norse name Ingríðr meaning "Ing is beautiful", derived from the name of the Germanic god ING combined with fríðr "beautiful". A famous bearer was the Swedish actress Ingrid Bergman (1915-1982).

IRIS

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek Mythology, English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, French, Spanish

Other Scripts: Ιρις (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: IE-ris (English), EE-ris (German, Dutch), EE-rees (Finnish)

Rating: 62% based on 21 votes

Means "rainbow" in Greek. Iris was the name of the Greek goddess of the rainbow. This name can also be given in reference to the English word (which derives from the same Greek source) for the name of the iris flower or the coloured part of the eye.

JAMES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Biblical

Pronounced: JAYMZ (English)

Rating: 69% based on 22 votes

English form of the Late Latin name Iacomus which was derived from Ιακωβος (Iakobos), the New Testament Greek form of the Hebrew name Ya'aqov (see JACOB). This was the name of two apostles in the New Testament. The first was Saint James the Greater, the apostle John's brother, who was beheaded under Herod Agrippa in the Book of Acts. The second was James the Lesser, son of Alphaeus. Another James (known as James the Just) is also mentioned in the Bible as being the brother of Jesus.

Since the 13th century this form of the name has been used in England, though it became more common in Scotland, where it was borne by several kings. In the 17th century the Scottish king James VI inherited the English throne, becoming the first ruler of all Britain, and the name grew much more popular. Famous bearers include the explorer Captain James Cook (1728-1779), the inventor James Watt (1736-1819), and the novelist and poet James Joyce (1882-1941). This name has also been borne by six American presidents. A notable fictional bearer is the British spy James Bond, created by author Ian Fleming.

JAYNE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: JAYN

Rating: 34% based on 21 votes

Variant of JANE

JOAQUÍN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish

Rating: 37% based on 19 votes

Spanish form of JOACHIM

JUDAS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical

Pronounced: JOO-dəs (English)

Rating: 28% based on 21 votes

From Ιουδας (Ioudas), the Greek form of JUDAH. Judas Iscariot is the apostle who betrays Jesus in the New Testament.

JUNO

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Roman Mythology

Pronounced: JOO-no (English)

Rating: 45% based on 19 votes

Meaning unknown, possibly related to an Indo-European root meaning "youth", or possibly of Etruscan origin. In Roman mythology Juno was the wife of Jupiter and the queen of the heavens. She was the protectress of marriage and women, and was also the goddess of finance.

KATIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Катя (Russian)

Pronounced: KAH-tyah

Rating: 52% based on 19 votes

Variant transcription of KATYA

KATYA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Russian

Other Scripts: Катя (Russian)

Pronounced: KAH-tyah

Rating: 55% based on 21 votes

Diminutive of YEKATERINA

KEANU

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: Hawaiian

Rating: 26% based on 17 votes

Means "the cool breeze" from Hawaiian ke, a definite article, and anu "coolness".

KIAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Rating: 36% based on 19 votes

Variant of CIAN

KONSTANTIN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German, Hungarian, Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian

Other Scripts: Константин (Russian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Macedonian)

Pronounced: KAWN-stahn-teen (German), kahn-stahn-TEEN (Russian)

Rating: 45% based on 18 votes

Cognate of CONSTANTINE

KURT

Gender: Masculine

Usage: German

Pronounced: KUWRT

Rating: 40% based on 19 votes

German contracted form of CONRAD

KURTIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: KUR-tis

Rating: 29% based on 19 votes

Variant of CURTIS

LAYLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Arabic, English

Other Scripts: ليلى (Arabic)

Pronounced: LAY-lə (English)

Rating: 48% based on 20 votes

Means "night" in Arabic. This was the name of the object of romantic poems written by the 7th-century poet known as Qays. The story of Qays and Layla became a popular romance in medieval Arabia and Persia. The name became used in the English-speaking world after the 1970 release of the song 'Layla' by Derek and the Dominos, the title of which was inspired by the medieval story.

LENNON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Scottish, English (Rare)

Pronounced: LEN-ən

Rating: 21% based on 21 votes

Anglicized form of the Irish surname Ó Leannáin, which means "descendent of Leannán". The name Leannán means "lover" in Gaelic. This surname was borne by musician John Lennon (1940-1980), a member of the Beatles.

LEONARDO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, History

Pronounced: le-o-NAHR-do (Italian, Spanish), lee-ə-NAHR-do (English)

Rating: 65% based on 21 votes

Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is also known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).

LIBBY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIB-ee

Rating: 33% based on 18 votes

Originally a medieval diminutive of Ibb, itself a diminutive of ISABEL. It is also used as a diminutive of ELIZABETH.

LINDEN

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: LIN-dən

Rating: 29% based on 21 votes

From a German surname which was derived from linde meaning "lime tree".

LOUIS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: French, English, Dutch

Pronounced: loo-EE (French), LOO-is (English)

Rating: 57% based on 3 votes

French form of Ludovicus, the Latinized form of LUDWIG. This was the name of 18 kings of France, starting with Louis I the son of Charlemagne, and including Louis IX (Saint Louis) who led two crusades and Louis XIV (the 'Sun King') who was the ruler of France during the height of its power, the builder of the Palace of Versailles, and the longest reigning monarch in the history of Europe.

Apart from among royalty, this name was only moderately popular in France during the Middle Ages. After the French Revolution, when Louis XVI was guillotined, it became less common. The Normans brought the name to England, where it was usually spelled Lewis, though the spelling Louis has been more common in America. Famous bearers include French scientist Louis Pasteur (1822-1895), Métis leader Louis Riel (1844-1885), who led a rebellion against Canada, and Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894), who wrote 'Treasure Island' and 'Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde'.

LOURDES

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Various

Pronounced: LOOR-des (Spanish), LUWRD (French), LAWRDZ (English)

Rating: 39% based on 21 votes

From the name of a French town. It became a popular center of pilgrimage after a young girl from the town had visions of the Virgin Mary in a nearby grotto.

LUCIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Italian, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Romanian, Slovak, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: loo-CHEE-ah (Italian), LOO-tsee-ah (German), LOO-shə (English), loo-SEE-ə (English)

Rating: 65% based on 20 votes

Feminine form of LUCIUS. Saint Lucia was a 4th-century martyr from Syracuse. She was said to have had her eyes gouged out, and thus is the patron saint of the blind. She was widely revered in the Middle Ages, and her name has been used throughout Christian Europe (in various spellings). It has been used in the England since the 12th century, usually in the spellings Lucy or Luce.

LYRIC

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: LIR-ik

Rating: 28% based on 20 votes

Means simply "lyric, songlike" from the English word, ultimately derived from Greek λυρικος (lyrikos).

MADDISON

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MAD-i-sən

Rating: 21% based on 24 votes

Variant of MADISON

MADDOX

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: MAD-əks

Rating: 23% based on 21 votes

From a Welsh surname meaning "son of MADOC". It was brought to public attention when the actress Angelina Jolie gave this name to her adopted son in 2002.

MANDY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: MAN-dee

Rating: 31% based on 18 votes

Diminutive of AMANDA

MATEO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Croatian

Pronounced: mah-TE-o (Spanish)

Rating: 43% based on 19 votes

Spanish form of MATTHEW. This form is also sometimes used in Croatia, from the Italian form MATTEO.

MICHAEL

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Czech, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek

Other Scripts: מִיכָאֵל (Ancient Hebrew), Μιχαηλ (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: MIE-kəl (English), MI-khah-el (German), MEE-kah-el (Swedish, Norwegian, Danish)

Rating: 51% based on 18 votes

From the Hebrew name מִיכָאֵל (Mikha'el) meaning "who is like God?". This is a rhetorical question, implying no person is like God. Michael is one of the seven archangels in Hebrew tradition and the only one identified as an archangel in the Bible. In the Book of Revelation in the New Testament he is portrayed as the leader of heaven's armies, and thus is considered the patron saint of soldiers.

The popularity of the saint led to the name being used by nine Byzantine emperors, including Michael VIII Palaeologus who restored the empire in the 13th century. It has been common in Western Europe since the Middle Ages, and in England since the 12th century. It has been borne (in various spellings) by rulers of Russia (spelled Михаил), Romania (Mihai), Poland (Michał), and Portugal (Miguel). Other bearers of this name include the British chemist/physicist Michael Faraday (1791-1867), musician Michael Jackson (1958-2009), and basketball player Michael Jordan (1963-).

MILO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Ancient Germanic

Pronounced: MIE-lo (English)

Rating: 60% based on 10 votes

Old Germanic form of MILES, as well as the Latinized form. This form of the name was used in official documents during the Middle Ages, and it has been used independently since the 19th century.

MOSES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English, Jewish, Biblical, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: מֹשֶׁה (Hebrew)

Pronounced: MOZ-əs (English)

Rating: 24% based on 18 votes

From the Hebrew name מֹשֶׁה (Mosheh) which is most likely derived from Egyptian mes meaning "son", but could also possibly mean "deliver" in Hebrew. The meaning suggested in the Old Testament of "drew out" from Hebrew משה (mashah) is probably an invented etymology. The biblical Moses was drawn out of the Nile by the pharaoh's daughter. He led the Jews out of captivity in Egypt and received the Ten Commandments from God.

In England, this name has been commonly used by Christians since the Protestant Reformation, though it had long been popular among Jews.

NATALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, English, German

Pronounced: nat-a-LEE (French), NAD-ə-lee (English), NAH-tah-lee (German)

Rating: 50% based on 18 votes

From the Late Latin name Natalia, which meant "Christmas Day" from Latin natale domini. This was the name of the wife of the 4th-century martyr Saint Adrian of Nicomedia. She is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, and the name has traditionally been more common among Eastern Christians than those in the West. It was popularized in America by actress Natalie Wood (1938-1981), who was born to Russian immigrants.

NOLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Irish

Pronounced: NO-lə

Rating: 45% based on 19 votes

Diminutive of MAGNOLIA, FINOLA or other names containing a similar sound.

NOLAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English

Pronounced: NO-lan

Rating: 57% based on 19 votes

From an Irish surname which was derived from Ó Nualláin meaning "descendent of NUALLÁN". The baseball player Nolan Ryan (1947-) is a famous bearer of this name.

NOVA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: NO-və

Rating: 40% based on 22 votes

Derived from Latin novus meaning "new". It was first used as a name in the 19th century.

OCTAVIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Spanish, Ancient Roman

Pronounced: ahk-TAYV-ee-ə (English)

Rating: 80% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of OCTAVIUS. Octavia was the wife of Mark Antony and the sister of Roman emperor Augustus. In 19th-century England it was sometimes given to the eighth-born child.

OLYMPIA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Greek, Slovak

Other Scripts: Ολυμπια (Greek)

Rating: 100% based on 1 vote

Feminine form of OLYMPOS

OMRI

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew

Other Scripts: עָמְרִי (Hebrew)

Rating: 34% based on 18 votes

Possibly means "life" or "servant" in Hebrew (or a related Semitic language). This was the name of a 9th-century BC military commander who became king of Israel. He appears in the Old Testament, where he is denounced as being wicked.

ORION

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Greek Mythology

Other Scripts: Ωριων (Ancient Greek)

Pronounced: o-RIE-ən (English)

Rating: 50% based on 3 votes

Meaning unknown, but possibly related to Greek ‘οριον (horion) "boundary, limit". This is the name of a constellation, which gets its name from a legendary Greek hunter killed by a scorpion sent by Gaia.

OZZY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: AHZ-ee

Rating: 21% based on 21 votes

Variant of OZZIE

RAINE

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: RAYN

Rating: 36% based on 19 votes

Possibly based on the French word reine meaning "queen". A famous bearer is the British socialite Raine Spencer (1929-), the stepmother of Princess Diana. In modern times it can also be used as a variant of RAIN or a short form of LORRAINE.

RHYS

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Welsh

Pronounced: HREES (Welsh), REES (English)

Rating: 62% based on 23 votes

Means "enthusiasm" in Welsh. Several Welsh rulers have borne this name.

RIO (2)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Japanese

Other Scripts: 莉央, 莉緒, 里桜 (Japanese)

Pronounced: ṙee-o

Rating: 3% based on 3 votes

From Japanese 莉 (ri) "jasmine" or 里 (ri) "village" combined with 央 (o) "center", 緒 (o) "thread" or 桜 (ou) "cherry blossom".

RIVER

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: RIV-ər

Rating: 47% based on 20 votes

From the English word that denotes a flowing body of water. The word is ultimately derived (via Old French) from Latin ripa "riverbank".

RÓNÁN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: RON-awn

Rating: 70% based on 20 votes

Means "little seal", derived from Irish rón "seal" combined with a diminutive suffix.

ROSA (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, German, English

Pronounced: RO-sah (Spanish, Dutch), RAW-zah (Italian), RO-zə (English)

Rating: 38% based on 19 votes

Generally this can be considered a Latin form of ROSE, though originally it may have come from the Germanic name ROZA (2). This was the name of a 13th-century saint from Viterbo in Italy. In the English-speaking world it was first used in the 19th century. A famous bearer was civil rights activist Rosa Parks (1913-2005).

ROSALIE

Gender: Feminine

Usage: French, German, English

Pronounced: ro-za-LEE (French), RO-zə-lee (English)

Rating: 33% based on 3 votes

French and German form of ROSALIA. In the English-speaking this name received a boost after the release of the movie 'Rosalie' (1938), which was based on an earlier musical.

ROSEMARY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: ROZ-mə-ree

Rating: 27% based on 3 votes

Combination of ROSE and MARY. This name can also be given in reference to the herb, which gets its name from Latin ros marinus meaning "dew of the sea". It came into use as a given name in the 19th century.

ROWAN

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Irish, English (Modern)

Pronounced: RO-ən (English)

Rating: 52% based on 20 votes

From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Ruadháin meaning "descendent of RUADHÁN". This name can also be given in reference to the rowan tree.

SAMSON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Biblical, English, Biblical Latin

Other Scripts: שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SAM-sən (English)

Rating: 30% based on 19 votes

From the Hebrew name שִׁמְשׁוֹן (Shimshon) which meant "sun". Samson was an Old Testament hero granted exceptional strength by God. His mistress Delilah betrayed him and cut his hair, stripping him of his power. Thus he was captured by the Philistines, blinded, and brought to their temple. However, in a final act of strength, he pulled down the pillars of the temple upon himself and his captors.

This name was known among the Normans due to the Welsh bishop Saint Samson, who founded monasteries in Brittany and Normandy in the 6th century. In his case, the name may have been a translation of his true Celtic name. As an English name, Samson was common during the Middle Ages, having been introduced by the Normans.

SANTIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Pronounced: sahn-TYAH-go (Spanish)

Rating: 43% based on 19 votes

Means "Saint James", derived from Spanish santo "saint" combined with Yago, an old Spanish form of JAMES, the patron saint of Spain. Cities in Chile and Spain bear this name.

SAWYER

Gender: Masculine & Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: SOI-ər, SAW-yər

Rating: 49% based on 22 votes

From a surname meaning "sawer of wood" in Middle English. Mark Twain used it for the hero in his novel 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer' (1876).

SHAY (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: SHAY

Rating: 27% based on 19 votes

Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA

SHEA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Irish

Pronounced: SHAY

Rating: 28% based on 18 votes

Anglicized form of SÉAGHDHA, sometimes used as a feminine name.

SHILOH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Biblical

Other Scripts: שִׁלוֹ, שִׁילֹה (Ancient Hebrew)

Pronounced: SHIE-lo (English)

Rating: 26% based on 21 votes

From an Old Testament place name possibly meaning "tranquil" in Hebrew. It is also used prophetically in the Old Testament to refer to a person, often understood to be the Messiah (see Genesis 49:10). This may in fact be a mistranslation. This name was brought to public attention after Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie gave it to their daughter in 2006.

SOL (1)

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, Portuguese

Rating: 36% based on 8 votes

Means "the sun" in Spanish or Portuguese.

STELLA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English, Italian

Pronounced: STEL-ə (English)

Rating: 61% based on 21 votes

Means "star" in Latin. This name was created by the 16th-century poet Sir Philip Sidney for the subject of his collection of sonnets 'Astrophel and Stella'. It was not commonly used as a given name until the 19th century. It appears in Tennessee Williams' play 'A Streetcar Named Desire' (1947), belonging to the sister of Blanche DuBois and the wife of Stanley Kowalski.

SUMMER

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SUM-ər

Rating: 45% based on 20 votes

From the name of the season, ultimately from Old English sumor. It has been in use as a given name since the 1970s.

SYDNEY

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: SID-nee

Rating: 28% based on 20 votes

From a surname which was a variant of the surname SIDNEY. This is the name of the largest city in Australia, which was named for Thomas Townshend, 1st Viscount Sydney in 1788. Since the 1990s this name has been mainly feminine.

TALLULAH

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Rare)

Pronounced: tə-LOO-lə

Rating: 44% based on 20 votes

Popularly claimed to mean "leaping waters" in the Choctaw language, it may actually mean "town" in the Creek language. This is the name of waterfalls in Georgia. It was borne by American actress Tallulah Bankhead (1902-1968), who was named after her grandmother, who may have been named after the waterfalls.

TATUM

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: TA-təm

Rating: 37% based on 19 votes

From a surname which was originally derived from a place name meaning "Tata's homestead" in Old English.

TAYLOR

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English

Pronounced: TAY-lər

Rating: 25% based on 21 votes

From an English surname which originally denoted someone who was a tailor, from Norman French tailleur, ultimately from Latin taliare "to cut". Its modern use as a feminine name may have been influenced by British author Taylor Caldwell (1900-1985).

TIAGO

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Portuguese

Rating: 34% based on 18 votes

Portuguese form of JAMES, derived from SANTIAGO.

ULYSSES

Gender: Masculine

Usage: Roman Mythology, English

Pronounced: yoo-LIS-eez (English)

Rating: 20% based on 3 votes

Latin form of ODYSSEUS. It was borne by Ulysses S. Grant (1822-1885), the commander of the Union forces during the American Civil War, who went on to become an American president. Irish author James Joyce used it as the title of his book 'Ulysses' (1920), which loosely parallels Homer's epic the 'Odyssey'.

WESLEY

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-lee

Rating: 58% based on 19 votes

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.

WESTON

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WES-tən

Rating: 36% based on 11 votes

From a surname which was derived from a place name meaning "west town" in Old English.

WILLIAM

Gender: Masculine

Usage: English

Pronounced: WIL-ee-əm, WIL-yəm

Rating: 67% based on 22 votes

From the Germanic name Willahelm, which was composed of the elements wil "will, desire" and helm "helmet, protection". Saint William of Gellone was an 8th-century cousin of Charlemagne who became a monk. The name was common among the Normans, and it became extremely popular in England after William the Conqueror was recognized as the first Norman king of England. It was later borne by three other English kings, as well as rulers of Scotland, Sicily (of Norman origin), the Netherlands and Prussia.

Other famous bearers include William Wallace, a 13th-century Scottish hero, and William Tell, a legendary 14th-century Swiss hero. In the literary world it was borne by dramatist William Shakespeare (1564-1616), poet William Blake (1757-1827), poet William Wordsworth (1770-1850), dramatist William Butler Yeats (1865-1939), author William Faulkner (1897-1962), and author William S. Burroughs (1914-1997).

WILLOW

Gender: Feminine

Usage: English (Modern)

Pronounced: WIL-o

Rating: 56% based on 21 votes

From the name of the tree, which is ultimately derived from Old English welig.

YOLANDA

Gender: Feminine

Usage: Spanish, English

Pronounced: yo-LAHN-də (English)

Rating: 24% based on 21 votes

From the medieval French name Yolande, which was possibly a form of the name Violante, which was itself a derivative of Latin viola "violet". Alternatively it could be of Germanic origin.

This name was borne by a 12th-century empress of the Latin Empire in Constantinople, who was originally from Flanders. It was also used by her descendents in the royal families of Hungary (spelled Jolánta) and Spain (sometimes spelled Violante). The Blessed Yolanda of Poland was a daughter of Béla IV of Hungary who married a Polish duke. Another notable bearer was a 13th-century countess of Vianden in Luxembourg who joined a convent against her parents' wishes, later becoming the subject of medieval legend.

Copyright © Mike Campbell 1996-2014.