Ancient Germanic Submitted Names

These names were used by the ancient Germanic peoples of Europe. See also about Germanic names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ÁBIǪRN m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic name element agi "awe, terror", or egg "edge, sharpness (of a weapon)", or ana, an emphasizing prefix, or anu "ancestor" with Björn.
ADALBALD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German adal "noble" and Old High German bald "bold, brave."
ADALBOD m Ancient Germanic
Old High German name derived from the elements adal "noble" and boto "bid, offer".
ADALBRAND m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble sword", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old Norse brand "sword".
ADALBURG f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this Germanic name is derived from Old High German adal "noble." The second element is derived from Gothic bairgan (bergan in Old High German) "to keep, to save, to preserve", or from Old High German burg "fortress."
ADALDAG m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble day", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with daga "day."
ADALELM m Ancient Germanic
Variant of Adalhelm. This name was borne by a count of Troyes from the 9th century AD.
ADALFRID m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble peace", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German fridu "peace".
ADALGAR m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this Germanic name is derived from Old High German adal "noble". The second element is derived from Gothic gairu (gêr in Old High German) "spear", or from garva (garo in Old High German, and gearu in Anglo-Saxon) "ready, prepared."
ADALGARD f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Old High German adal "noble." The second element is derived from gardan "to hedge in, to enclose, to fence in" or from Gothic gards "house, garden, (court)yard."
ADALGERN m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic gairns "eager, desiring."
ADALGILD f Ancient Germanic
Means "noble sacrifice", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic gild "sacrifice."
ADALGIS m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this Germanic name comes from Old High German adal "noble." The meaning and origin of the second element is rather uncertain: we know that it comes from gis (the original form was possibly gîs), but we don't exactly know where gis itself comes from... [more]
ADALGISEL m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with gisel "hostage" or "pledge."
ADALGOD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic guths "god" or Gothic gôds "good."
ADALGRIM m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble mask", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old Norse grîma "mask."
ADALGUND f Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German gund "war."
ADALHAID f Old High German
Old High German name with the combination of adal "noble" and heit "kind, sort, appearance".
ADALHELM m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble protection", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German helm "helmet, protection".
ADALHER m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble army", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German hari "army."
ADALHILD f Ancient Germanic
Means "noble battle", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old Norse hildr "battle."
ADALIND f Ancient Germanic
Composed from the Germanic elements ADAL "noble" and LIND "linden tree, lime; shield (made of lime wood); gentle, soft".... [more]
ADALINDA f Old High German
Derived from the Germanic elements adal "noble" and lind "linden tree, lime; shield (made of lime wood); gentle, soft".
ADALLAND m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble land", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with land "land."
ADALMAN m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble man", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with man "man."
ADALMAR m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble and famous", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German mâri "famous." Also, see Elmer.
ADALMUND m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble protection", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German mund "protection."
ADALMUT f Ancient Germanic
Means "noble mind", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic môds (mut in New High German) "mind, spirit."
ADALOALD m Ancient Germanic
Variant of Adalwald. Adaloald was the name of a 7th-century king of the Lombards.
ADALRAD m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble counsel", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German rât "counsel."
ADALRAM m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble raven", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with hraban or hramn "raven."
ADALRIC m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble power", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler."
ADALSIND f Ancient Germanic
Means "noble path", derived from Old High German adal "noble" and Gothic sinths "way, path."
ADALSTEIN m Ancient Germanic
Ancient Germanic form of Aethelstan.
ADALSWIND f Ancient Germanic
Means "noble strength", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength."
ADALTRUD f Ancient Germanic
Means "noble strength", derived from Old High German adal "noble" and þruþ "strength."
ADALWALD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic valdan "to reign."
ADALWARD m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble guard", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German wart "guard."
ADALWIG m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble warrior", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Old High German wîg "warrior."
ADALWULF m Ancient Germanic
Means "noble wolf", derived from Old High German adal "noble" combined with Gothic vulfs "wolf." See also Adolf.
ADELELMUS m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Variant of Adelhelmus, which is the latinized form of Adelhelm. Also compare Adalhelmus. This name was borne by two saints, namely Adelelmus of Burgos (died around 1100 AD) and Adelelmus of Flanders (died in 1152 AD).
ADELMANN m Old High German
Combination of Old High German elements adal "noble" and man meaning "man".
ADELRUN f Old High German
Combination of adal "noble" and rûna "secret".
ADOSINDA f Ancient Germanic (Gothic), Medieval Spanish
Visigothic name possibly derived from the Germanic elements aud "wealth" and sinþs "path". This was the name of an 8th-century queen of Asturias, Spain. It was also borne by the maternal grandmother of the 10th-century Galician saint Rosendo (as well as a sister of his).
ADULPHUS m Ancient Scandinavian, Old Swedish
Latinized form of Oddulf and variant of Adolphus.
ÆGEN m Anglo-Saxon
Diminutive of names beginning with Ægen, such as Ægenbald and Ægenwulf.
ÆGENBALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æġen, āgan, "to own, possess, have" and beald "bold".
ÆGENWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æġen, āgan, "to own, possess, have" and wulf "wolf".
ÆGILL m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Egill.
ÆGLI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Egill.
ÆILÆIFR m Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of Old Norse einn "one, alone" and leifr "descendent" or ǣvi "life" and leifr "descendent", as well as a variant of ØylæifR.
ÆILAFR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of ÆilæifR.
ÆINRIÐI m Ancient Scandinavian
Ancient Scandinavian name with the combination of einn "one, alone" and Old Norse ríða meaning "to ride", a combination of einn "one, alone" and Old Norse reiða meaning "to swing (a sword)" or a variant form of Einráði.
ÆISTI m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Æistr.
ÆISTMAÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse eistr "Estonians" and maðr "man".
ÆISTR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse eistr "Estonians".
ǢLĀF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Olaf.
ÆLFHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Alfher.
ÆLFRÚN f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and rún "secret, hidden knowledge, mystery, dark mysterious statement" (also "a runic letter").
ÆLFWARU f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and waru (plural wara) "guard" (i.e., guardian of a particular place by profession).
ÆLFWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and weald "leader, ruler".
ÆLFWYNN f Anglo-Saxon
Means "elf joy" from Old English ælf "elf" and wynn "joy". It was borne by a granddaughter of Alfred the Great.
ÆLLE m Anglo-Saxon
Means "all, universal" in Old English. It was borne by several Anglo-Saxon kings, including the legendary first king of the South Saxons.
ÆNNIBRANTR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse enni "forehead" and brattr "steep".
ÆRINGUNNR f Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of Ancient Scandinavian ǫrn "eagle" and gunnr "battle, fight".
ÆRINVÍ f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name with several possible meanings. The first element can be derived from Old Norse ǫrn or ari, both meaning "eagle". It's also identical to Old Swedish ærin (Old Norse arinn) "hotbed, hearth"... [more]
ÆRNFASTR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Arnfastr.
ÆRNGAUTR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse combination of ǫrn "eagle" and gautr "goth".
ÆSA f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic, Faroese
Old Norse, Icelandic and Faroese variant of Ása.
ÆSCHERE m Anglo-Saxon, Anglo-Saxon Mythology
Derived from the Old English elements æsc "ash tree" and here "army". This name occurs in the 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf' belonging to King Hroðgar's most trusted adviser; Æschere is killed by Grendel's mother in her attack on Heorot after Grendel's death.
ÆSCWINE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æsc "ash tree" and wine "friend".
ÆSCWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æsc "ash tree" and wulf "wolf".
ǢSTRÍÐR f Ancient Scandinavian
East Nordic variant of Ástríðr.
ÆÐELBEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalbald.
ÆÐELGAR m Anglo-Saxon
Means "noble spear" from Old English æðel "noble" and gar "spear". It is a cognate of Adalgar.
ÆÐELGIFU f Anglo-Saxon
Means "noble gift", from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and giefu "gift".
ÆÐELGYÐ f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and gyð "war". It is a cognate of Adalgund. This was the name of an Anglo-Saxon saint (Æthelgyth of Coldingham).
ÆÐELHEARD m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalhard.
ÆÐELHERE m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and here "army".
ÆÐELHILD f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and hild "battle".
ÆÐELMUND m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalmund.
ÆTHELWALD m Anglo-Saxon, History
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwold. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwald Moll, an 8th-century king of Northumbria.
ÆTHELWEALD m Anglo-Saxon
Variant spelling of Æþelweald, which itself is a variant form of Æðelweald, an Anglo-Saxon masculine name that is composed of Old English æðel meaning "noble" and Old English weald meaning "power, leader, ruler".... [more]
ÆTHELWIN m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æþelwine (see Æthelwine), which itself is a variant of Æðelwine.
ÆTHELWOLD m Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Variant of Æthelweald. Also compare Æthelwald. A known bearer of this name was Æthelwold of East Anglia, a 7th-century king of East Anglia.
ÆÐELWULF m Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Adalwolf (see Adolf).
AFKARR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname, from Old Norse afkárr meaning "strange", "prodigious".
ÁGÁTA f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Agatha.
AGILBALD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Old High German bald "bold, brave."
AGILBERN m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Proto-Germanic beran or bernu "bear" (bero and bern in Old High German).
AGILBERT m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Old High German beraht "bright".
AGILBRAND m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Old Norse brand "sword."
AGILFRID m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Old High German fridu "peace."
AGILHARD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Gothic hardus (hart in Old High German) "brave, hardy."
AGILMUND m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Old High German mund "protection."
AGILULFUS m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Agilulf. Agilulfus of Cologne was an 8th-century saint.
AGILWARD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agil (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and also Egil) combined with Old High German wart "guard."
AGIMAR m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from ag, an uncertain element for which a few possible origins exist. The accepted explanation is that it comes from Proto-Germanic *agjo, which means "sharp, pointed." Because of that, it also means "edge", as in the sharp cutting side of a sword - which is why the meaning of the element has ultimately come to be "sword"... [more]
AGINBALD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agin (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund) combined with Old High German bald "bold, brave."
AGINBERT m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agin (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund) combined with Old High German beraht "bright."
AGINFRID m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agin (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund) combined with Old High German fridu "peace."
AGINHARD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agin (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund) combined with Gothic hardus (hart in Old High German) "brave, hardy."
AGINRIC m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agin (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund and compare Egino) combined with rîcja "powerful, strong, mighty." The second element is also closely related to Celtic rîg or rix and Gothic reiks, which all mean "king, ruler."
AGINTRUD f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element agin (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund) combined with þruþ "strength."
AGINULF m Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements agin "edge of a sword" (which is an extended form of ag - see Agmund) and wulf "wolf".
AGMUND m Ancient Germanic, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish (Archaic)
The first element of this name is derived from ag, an uncertain element for which a few possible origins exist. The accepted explanation is that it comes from Proto-Germanic *agjo, which means "sharp, pointed." Because of that, it also means "edge", as in the sharp cutting side of a sword - which is why the meaning of the element has ultimately come to be "sword"... [more]
AGÐA f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of Agatha.
AGWIN m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, in which the second element is win meaning "friend". The first element, ag, is of uncertain origin, though the accepted explanation is that it comes from Proto-Germanic *agjo "sharp, pointed"... [more]
AISTULF m Ancient Germanic (Lombardic)
Variant of Haistulf. Aistulf was the name of an 8th-century king of the Lombards.
AIULF m Medieval Italian, Medieval English, Ancient Germanic
A Germanic name formed from the name elements AGIN "edge (of a sword)" and WULF "wolf".
AIWAREIKS m Ancient Germanic (Gothic)
Derived from the Germanic elements aiws "eternity" and reiks "ruler".
ALABALD m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German bald "bold, brave."
ALABERT m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German beraht "bright."
ALAFRID m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German fridu "peace."
ALAGARD f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from gardan "to hedge in, to enclose, to fence in" or from Gothic gards "house, garden, (court)yard."
ALAGAST m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Gothic gasts (gast in Old High German) "guest, stranger."... [more]
ALAGERN m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Gothic gairns "eager, desiring."
ALAGIS m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this Germanic name comes from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The meaning and origin of the second element is rather uncertain: we know that it comes from gis (the original form was possibly gîs), but we don't exactly know where gis itself comes from... [more]
ALAGISEL m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from gisel "hostage" or "pledge."
ALAGUND f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German gund "war."
ALAHILD f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old Norse hildr "battle."
ALAHIS m Ancient Germanic (Lombardic)
The name of a 7th-century Lombard king.
ALAMAN m Ancient Germanic, Gascon (Archaic)
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from man "man."
ALAMAR m Ancient Germanic, Portuguese (Brazilian), American (Hispanic)
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German mâri "famous."
ALAMUND m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German mund "protection."
ALAMUT m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Gothic môds (mut in New High German) "mind, spirit."
ALARAD m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German rât "counsel."
ALARAM m Ancient Germanic
Germanic name, in which the second element is hramn meaning "raven". The first element may be ala "all" (compare Alaric) or a form of Gothic alhs "temple" (Old High German alah).
ALARID m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Anglo-Saxon ridan "to ride."
ALASIND f Ancient Germanic
Gothic name derived from the elements alhs "temple" (Old High German alah) and sinþs "way, path".
ALASWIND f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength."
ALAVIV m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this Gothic name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The etymology of the second element is uncertain; it may be derived from Gothic qvivs "alive, living"... [more]
ALAVIVUS m Ancient Germanic (Latinized), History
Latinized form of Alaviv. Alavivus was a leader of the Thervingi (a Gothic tribe), who lived in the 4th century AD.
ALAWARD m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German wart "guard."
ALAWIG m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German wîg "warrior."
ALAWIN m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German wini "friend."
ALAWIS m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from Gothic alls "all" or from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple." The second element is derived from Old High German wîsan "to rule, to lead" (or wîso "leader" or wîs "wise").
ALBEGUND f Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German alb (which comes from Old Norse âlfr) "elf" combined with Old High German gund "war."
ALBERAD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German alb (which comes from Old Norse âlfr) "elf" combined with Old High German rât "counsel."
ALBERADA f Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Alberad.
ALBJǪRN m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Alfbjǫrn.
ALBRIKT m Ancient Scandinavian, Old Swedish, Norwegian (Rare)
Old Norse and Old Swedish form of Albrecht.
ALBRUN f Ancient Germanic
Combination of Old High German alb "elf; supernatural being" (ultimately from Proto-Germanic *albh- "to shine; gleam") and run "secret lore" (ultimately from Proto-Germanic *rûno- "secret; magic; murmur; session").
ALBWIN m Ancient Germanic
Derived from Old High German alb (which comes from Old Norse âlfr) "elf" combined with Old High German wini "friend".
ALCUIN m Anglo-Saxon (?), Ancient Germanic (Frankish, ?)
Old French name of Germanic origin, derived from Gothic alhs (alah in Old High German) "temple" and win "friend" (compare Alawin). Alcuin was an 8th-century Anglo-Saxon scholar and theologian... [more]
ALDEBRANDUS m Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latin form of Aldebrand. A famous bearer of the name was Saint Aldebrandus, who was born in the city of Sorrivoli, Italy and died in Fossombrone, Presaro e Ubrino, Italy.
ALDEGISEL m Ancient Germanic
It is most likely a metathesis of Adalgisel, although it is also possible that it is a name on its own. In that case, the name is derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" and gisel "hostage" or "pledge." Aldegisel I was a 7th-century ruler of Frisia.
ALDEMAR m Ancient Germanic, Dutch, German
Derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" combined with Old High German mâri "famous". The name might also be a metathesis of Adalmar.
ALDFRID m Ancient Germanic
Means "old peace", derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" combined with Old High German fridu "peace." The name might also be a metathesis of Adalfrid.
ALDGER m Old High German
Derived from the Germanic name elements ald "old" and gêr "spear".
ALDGRIM m Ancient Germanic
Means "old mask", derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" combined with Old Norse grîma "mask." The name might also be a metathesis of Adalgrim.
ALDHELM m Ancient Germanic
Means "old helmet", derived from the Germanic elements ald "old" and helm "helmet, protection". However, it should be noted that there are also various cases where this name is a variant form of Adalhelm, due to metathesis.... [more]
ALDÍS f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse variant and Icelandic form of Alfdís.
ALDMAN m Ancient Germanic
Means "old man", derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" combined with man "man." The name might also be a metathesis of Adalman.
ALDULF m Ancient Germanic
Means "old wolf", derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" combined with Gothic vulfs "wolf." The name might also be a metathesis of Adalwulf (see Adolf).
ALDÚLFR m Ancient Scandinavian
Ancient Scandinavian form of Aldulf.
ALDWARD m Ancient Germanic
Means "old guard", derived from Gothic alds (alt in Old High German) "old" combined with Old High German wart "guard." The name might also be a metathesis of Adalward.
ALEINN m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Alain.
ÁLFARR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant of Alfarr.
ALFBJǪRN m Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and bjǫrn "bear".
ALFDÍS f Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of the Old Norse elements alfr "elf" and dís "goddess".
ALFFINNR m Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of Old Norse alfr "elf" and finnr "finn, lapp".
ALFGEIRR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf" combined with Old Norse geirr "spear".
ÁLFGERÐR f Ancient Scandinavian
An Ancient Scandinavian with the combination of alfr "elf" and garðr "enclosure, protection".
ALFHEIÐR f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf" and heiðr "bright, clear, cloudless; honour".
ALFÍFA f Icelandic, Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name of uncertain meaning, the first element possibly from *alu "protection, fortune" or alfr "elf"; the second element, fífa means "cotton grass" and occurs in Old Icelandic poetry as a metaphor for "arrow" (a similar word, fífla, was used in 'Grettis saga' to mean "a girl")... [more]
ALFKETILL m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf" combined with Old Norse kettil "kettle, cauldron" (see also Kettil).
ALFLAUG f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf" and laug possibly meaning "betrothed woman".
ALFLED f Anglo-Saxon, Medieval English
Probably a variant of Ælfflæd. Also compare Æðelflæd (see Elfleda).
ÁLFMÓÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name, combination of ALF "elf" and MOD "excitement, concern, wrath; courage."
ALFNÝ f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic name elements alf "elf" and ny "new".
ALFRIGG m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Variant of Alfríkr or combination of alf "elf" and freginn "experienced". This is the name of one of the four dwarfs who made Freyja's necklace Brísingamen in Norse mythology.
ALFRÚN f Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from the Germanic name elements alfr "elf" and rún "secret".
ALFÞÓRR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf" and þórr "thunder".
ALFVALDR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse alfr "elf" combined with Old Norse valdr "ruler".
ALLVALDI m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Variant of Alvaldr. In Norse mythology this is the name of Þjazi's father.
ALMARR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name from the combination of the name elements ALM "elm" and HER "army." It is the Nordic form of the Old High German name Athalmar and a variant form of Álmgeirr.
ÁLMGEIRR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name, combination of ALM "elm" and GEIR "spear."
ALMÓÐR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse variant form of Álfmóðr.
ALMSTEINN m Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of Old Norse álmr "elm tree" and steinn "stone".
ALMVEIG f Ancient Scandinavian
Combination of Old Norse álmr "elm tree" and veig "power", "strength".
ALOARA f Ancient Germanic (Lombardic)
Etymology unknown. This was the name of a 10th-century princess regnant of Capua.
ALPHONSA f Ancient Germanic
Feminine form of Alphonsus (see Alfonso). This name was chosen by Saint Alphonsa in order to honor Saint Alphonsus Maria de' Liguori, C.Ss.R.
ALPHONSOS m Greek, Ancient Germanic (Hellenized)
Original Greek form of Alphonsus (see Alfonso).
ALREKR m Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of Alaric.
ALRÍKR m Ancient Scandinavian
Possibly a variant of Alarik, Adalrik or Alfríkr. Alternatively, it may be derived from the Old Norse elements ǫl "ale" and rikr "mighty, distinguished".
ALSIGE m Anglo-Saxon
Possibly a variant of Ælfsige.
ALSVARTR m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from the Germanic name elements allr "all, everybody, entire" and svartr "black". This is the name of a giant in Norse Mythology.
ALSVIÐR m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse ala "entire, all" and svinnr "fast, clever". In Norse mythology this is the name of both a jotunn and one of Sól's horses.
ALÞJÓFR m Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse ala "all, entire" and þjófr "thief". This is the name of a dwarf in Norse mythology.
ALVALDR m Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse ala "all, entire" and valdr "ruler, mighty one".
ALVÉR m Ancient Scandinavian
Variant of Ǫlvér, or possibly derived from allr "all, entire" and vér "fighter" or aluh "temple" and vér.
ALVER m Ancient Scandinavian, Estonian, Old Swedish
Old Swedish and younger form of AlvéR and Old Norse variant of Alfr.
ÁMA f Ancient Scandinavian, Greenlandic, Norse Mythology
Feminine form of Ámr or a Greenlandic form of Amma. In Norse mythology this is the name of a giantess.
AMALAFRID m Ancient Germanic
Variant spelling of Amalfrid. Through his mother Amalaberga, Amalafrid was a great-grandson of Theodemir, king of the Ostrogoths (in the 5th century AD).
AMALAFRIDA f Ancient Germanic, History
Variant of Amalfrida. Amalafrida was a daughter of Theodemir, king of the Ostrogoths in the 5th century AD.
AMALASWINTHA f Ancient Germanic, Dutch, History
Derived from the Germanic elements amal "work" and Gothic svinths (swind in Old High German) "strength." This name was borne by a daughter of Theodoric the Great, who became queen of the Ostrogoths after his death in 526 AD.
AMALBURG f Ancient Germanic
The first element of this name is derived from the Germanic element amal "work." The second element is derived from Gothic bairgan (bergan in Old High German) "to keep, to save, to preserve", or from Old High German burg "fortress."
AMALFRID m Ancient Germanic
Means "peaceful work", derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Old High German fridu "peace."
AMALGILD f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Gothic gild "sacrifice."
AMALGIS m Ancient Germanic
The first element of this Germanic name comes from amal "work." The meaning and origin of the second element is rather uncertain: we know that it comes from gis (the original form was possibly gîs), but we don't exactly know where gis itself comes from... [more]
AMALGUND f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Old High German gund "war."
AMALHARD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Gothic hardus (hart in Old High German) "brave, hardy."
AMALHILD f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Old Norse hildr "battle."
AMALRAD m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Old High German rât "counsel."
AMALTRUD f Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with þruþ "strength."
AMALWIN m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element amal "work" combined with Old High German wini "friend."
ÁMGERÐR f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology
Derived from Old Norse ámr "black, loathsome, dark" and garðr "enclosure, protection". This is the name of a giantess in Norse mythology.
AMLÓÐI m Ancient Scandinavian
Means "poor, weak fellow; fool, simpleton" in Old Norse, or derived from a combination of Old Norse of ama "to vex, annoy, molest" and Odin.
ÁMR m Ancient Scandinavian
Means "black, loathsome, reddish brown, dark" in Old Norse.
ÁNARR m Ancient Scandinavian
Derived from Old Norse anu "ancestor" and herr "army".