Names Starting with W

gender
usage
Wongani m & f Southern African, Chewa
Means "thank" in Chewa.
Woodie m English
Variant of Woody.
Woodrow m English
From an English surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "row of houses by a wood" in Old English. It was borne by the American president Woodrow Wilson (1856-1924), who was given his mother's maiden name as his middle name (his first name was Thomas). During his candidacy and presidency (1912-1921) the name became popular, reaching the 44th rank in 1913, though it quickly declined again after that.
Woody m English
Either a diminutive of Woodrow, or else from a nickname derived from the English word wood. A famous bearer is film director Woody Allen (1935-).
Woo-Jin m Korean
Alternate transcription of Korean Hangul 우진 (see U-Jin).
Workneh m Eastern African, Amharic
Means "you are gold", from Amharic ወርቅ (warq) meaning "gold".
Wout m Dutch
Short form of Wouter.
Wouter m Dutch
Dutch form of Walter.
Wren f English (Modern)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
Wright m English
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.
Wu m & f Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "military, martial" (which is generally only masculine) or () meaning "affairs, business", as well as other characters that are pronounced similarly. This was the name of several Chinese rulers, including the 2nd-century BC emperor Wu of Han (name spelled ) who expanded the empire and made Confucianism the state philosophy.
Wubbe m Frisian, Dutch
Variant of Wob.
Wukong m Literature
Means "awakened to emptiness", from Chinese () meaning "enlightenment, awakening" and (kōng) meaning "empty, hollow, sky". This is the name of the Monkey King, Sun Wukong, in the 16th-century Chinese novel Journey to the West.
Wulan f Javanese
Javanese form of Bulan.
Wulf m German
Variant of Wolf.
Wulfflæd f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and flæd "beauty".
Wulfgifu f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and giefu "gift".
Wulfnoð m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and noð "boldness, daring". This name became rare after the Norman Conquest.
Wulfric m Anglo-Saxon
Old English form of Ulric.
Wulfrun f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and run "secret, mystery". This was the name of a 10th-century English noblewoman who founded the city of Wolverhampton.
Wulfruna f History
Form of Wulfrun sometimes used in reference to the 10th-century noblewoman.
Wulfsige m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and sige "victory".
Wulfstan m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and stan "stone".
Wulfwynn f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wulf "wolf" and wynn "joy".
Wullem m Limburgish
Limburgish form of William.
Wum m Limburgish
Short form of Wullem.
Wyatt m English
From an English surname that was derived from the medieval given name Wyard or Wyot, from the Old English name Wigheard. Wyatt Earp (1848-1929) was an American lawman and gunfighter involved in the famous shootout at the OK Corral.
Wybert m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigberht, composed of the elements wig "battle" and beorht "bright".
Wymond m Medieval English
Middle English form of the Old English name Wigmund, composed of the elements wig "battle" and mund "protector".
Wyn m Welsh
Derived from Welsh gwyn meaning "blessed, white, fair".
Wynn m Welsh
Variant of Wyn.
Wynne 1 m & f Welsh
Variant of Wyn, sometimes used as a feminine form.
Wynne 2 m English (Rare)
From an English surname that was derived from the given name Wine.
Wynnflæd f Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wynn "joy" and flæd "beauty".
Wynnstan m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements wynn "joy" and stan "stone".
Wynona f English
Variant of Winona.
Wyot m Medieval English
Middle English form of Wigheard.
Wystan m English (Rare)
From the Old English name Wigstan, composed of the elements wig "battle" and stan "stone". This was the name of a 9th-century Anglo-Saxon saint. It became rare after the Norman Conquest, and in modern times it is chiefly known as the first name of the British poet W. H. Auden (1907-1973).