Ancient Roman Submitted Names

These names were used in ancient Rome and many parts of the Roman Empire. See also about Roman names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ACCIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen perhaps meaning "a call, summons" or "of Acca". A notable bearer was the tragic poet Lucius Accius.
ACHILLIAfAncient Roman
Feminization of Achilles. Achilles grew more popular, even becoming common soon after the seventh century BC and was also turned into the female form Achilleía, attested in Attica in the fourth century BC (IG II² 1617) and, in the form Achillia, on a stele in Halicarnassus as the name of a female gladiator fighting an "Amazon".
ACUTIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Acutius.
ACUTIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was derived from Latin acutus meaning "sharpened, pointed". It is ultimately derived from the Latin verb acuō "to sharpen, to make pointed". This name was borne by a Roman plebeian tribune from the 5th century BC.
ADELPHASIUMfAncient Roman, Theatre
Meaning unknown. This is the name of a character in the play 'Poenulus of Plautus'.
AEDIAfAncient Roman (Rare)
Feminine form of Aedius, a Roman family name.
AEDIUSmAncient Roman
A Roman family name.
AFRANIAfAncient Roman, Portuguese (Brazilian), Spanish (Latin American)
Feminine form of Afranius. A bearer of this name was the ancient Roman woman Gaia Afrania, wife of the senator Licinius Buccio.
AFRANIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile of uncertain origin. A bearer of this name was the ancient Roman poet Lucius Afranius (1st century BC).
ALBINIAfAncient Roman, English
Feminine form of Albinius and Albin. It was introduced to Britain in the 17th century, and was frequently used by members of the aristocratic Cecil family.
ALBINIANUSmAncient Roman, History
Roman cognomen which was derived from Albinius. A bearer of this name was Lucius Sestius Quirinalis Albinianus, a Roman proquaestor and suffect consul from the 1st century BC.
ALBINIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was derived from Albinus. This was the name of several ancient Romans, some of which lived as early as the 4th century BC.
ALBINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Albinus. This name was borne by a Greek Platonist philosopher from the 2nd century AD.
AMICAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Amicus.
AMICUSmAncient Roman
Means "friend" in Latin.
ANICIAfAncient Roman, Spanish (Latin American, Rare), English (Rare), French (Rare)
Feminine form of Anicius. The most well-known bearer of this name was Anicia Juliana, the daughter of Western Roman Emperor Olybrius.
ANICIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from a Roman nomen gentile of uncertain origin. This name was borne by several ancient Romans.
ANNIAfAncient Roman
Annia Aurelia Faustina (c. 201 AD – c. 222 AD) was an Anatolian Roman noblewoman. She was an Empress of Rome and third wife of the Roman emperor Elagabalus briefly in 221.
AQUILIAfAncient Roman, Italian, Spanish
Feminine form of Aquillius. This name was borne by Aquilia Severa, the second and fourth wife of Emperor Elagabalus.
AQUILLIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile derived from Latin aquila "eagle" (see also Aquila). This name was borne by several consuls from ancient Rome.
ARRIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Arrius. Bearers of this name include Arria Major (wife of Caecina Paetus) and her daughter Arria Minor.
ARRIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile, which is ultimately derived from the Etruscan personal male name Arntni, of which the meaning is unknown. Also compare Arruns. A bearer of this name was Quintus Arrius, a Roman praetor from the 1st century BC.
ARRUNTIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile, which is derived from the personal male name Arruns. This name was borne by several ancient Romans, such as the admiral and consul Lucius Arruntius the Elder and his son Lucius Arruntius the Younger, a senator.
ASPERmAncient Roman
From the latin word 'asper', meaning 'rough'. Usually used as last name in Ancient Rome.... [more]
ATIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman family name Atius, which is of unknown origin. This was the name of the mother of the Roman emperor Augustus.
AUFIDIAfAncient Roman, History
Feminine form of Aufidius. A bearer of this name was Aufidia, a daughter of the Roman magistrate Marcus Aufidius Lurco. Her own daughter, Livia Drusilla, would later become Roman Empress (as the wife of Emperor Augustus).
AUFIDIUSmAncient Roman, History, Literature
From the Roman nomen gentile Aufidius, which is of uncertain origin and meaning. The first element, au, may have been derived from the Latin preverb au "away, off", but it could also have been a phonetic variant of the Latin preverb ab "from"... [more]
AUGOUSTINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Augustinus (see Augustine(1)).
AULAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Aulus.
AUREOLAfAncient Roman
Roman slave name, a feminine diminutive of Latin aureus "golden" (possibly the feminine form of Aureolus, a derivative of Aureus). Camden (1605) lists Aureola "pretty little golden dame".
AURIAfAncient Roman, Basque
Means "golden" in Latin. From the Latin aurum 'gold'. See: Aurelia. The gens Auria was a Roman family at Larinum in southern Italy, known chiefly from Cicero's oration, 'Pro Cluentio'.
AURIUSmAncient Roman
Masculine form of Auria.
BIBULUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Latin adjective bibulus, which can mean "fond of drinking, drinking readily or freely, ever thirsty" (mostly in relation to alcoholic beverages), as well as "absorbent, porous"... [more]
BLANDAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman name Blandus; alternate form of Blandina. Blanda is also the name of an ancient Roman city in southern Italy.
BONUSmAncient Roman
From Latin bonum "good".
BRITANNICUSmAncient Roman
Latin byname meaning "of Britain". This was one of the bynames of Emperor Claudius after the Roman conquest of Britain in 43 AD. Claudius also gave it to his son, Britannicus (full name Tiberius Claudius Caesar Britannicus; 41-55 AD).
CAENISfAncient Roman, Greek Mythology
A name bore by a former slave who was Roman Emperor Vespasian's mistress, Antonia Caenis. She had a remarkable memory.... [more]
CAESARIONmAncient Greek, Ancient Roman, History
Latinized form of Greek Καισαρίων (Kaisarion), which in turn was a Hellenized form of Caesar with the Greek diminutive suffix -ιων (-ion) added to it. As such, the name essentially meant "little Caesar"... [more]
CAESULAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Caeso.
CAIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Caius.
CALPURNIAfAncient Roman, Literature
Feminine form of Calpurnius. It is the name of Julius Caesar's last wife, as well as the name of the Finches' cook in the book "To Kill a Mockingbird".
CALPURNIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Calpurnius. Bearers of this name include Roman consul Marcus Pupius Piso Frugi Calpurnianus (1st century BC) and Roman politician Marcus Antius Crescens Calpurnianus (3rd century AD).
CALPURNIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman nomen gentile, which was derived from Latin calpurnias, which ultimately comes from the word calpar "chalice, cup" (this originally referred to an earthen wine vessel).
CANINIUSmAncient Roman
From the Roman nomen Caninius, which is derived from Latin caninus "dog-like, of a dog" (which in turn is derived from Latin canis "dog").
CANIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin canus "old, grey(-haired), elderly" or Latin canis "dog." This name was borne by Canius Rufus, a Roman poet.
CAPITOmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin capito meaning "big-headed", which itself is ultimately derived from Latin capitis, the genitive of Latin caput meaning "head". A known bearer of this name was the Roman tribune Gaius Ateius Capito (1st century BC).
CAPITOLINUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin capitolium (related to Late Latin capitellum "small head, top of column", from which we derived our current word 'capital'), which is ultimately derived from Latin caput "head"... [more]
CARACALLAmAncient Roman
Roman Emperor 209 to 217. This was his nickname, derived from a type of cloak he wore.
CARUSmAncient Roman, History
Derived from Latin carus "dear, beloved." This name was borne by a Roman Emperor from the 3rd century AD.
CARVILIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile of unknown meaning. This name was borne by several Romans from the 3rd century BC. Please note that this name most likely has a different etymology than the identical-looking name of the Celtic king of Kent (England) from the 1st century BC, whose name was latinized.
CASTRICIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman nomen gentile, which was probably ultimately derived from Latin castrum "fortress, camp, castle" (see also Castrinus).
CATULLUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen, possibly a diminutive of Cato. This was the surname of a great 1st-century BCE Roman poet. 'Because the families of the poet Gaius Valerius Catullus and another 1st-century BCE poet, Publius Valerius Cato (born about 14 years earlier), both came from the same region of Upper Italy, it has been suggested by cognomina scholar Iiro Kajanto that the Valerii Catones may have preceded the Valerii Catulli, and that the name of the later was derived from the former.'
CINCINNATUSmAncient Roman
From Latin cincinnatus meaning "curly-haired". Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus (519–430 BC) was a consul of the Roman Republic.
CINNAmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen of uncertain meaning. This was the name of a Roman politician who was the father-in-law of Julius Caesar.
CLATEUSmAncient Roman
Saint Clateus (died 64 AD) was an early Christian martyr. He was an early bishop of the Roman Catholic Church in Brescia, Italy and was martyred during the persecutions of Christians by Nero.
CORDIAfAncient Roman, English (Rare)
Feminine form of Cordius. In the English-speaking world, this name can sometimes be a short form of Cordelia. A known bearer of this name is the American entrepreneur Cordia Harrington (b. 1954).
CORDIUSmAncient Roman
Fairly obscure Roman nomen gentile that originated with a plebeian family that was native to the city of Tusculum, which was an important center of worship for the Dioscuri. Only one member of this family is known to history, namely Manius Cordius Rufus (1st century BC)... [more]
CORIOLANUSmAncient Roman, History, Literature
Roman cognomen which was derived from Corioli, the name of an ancient but now lost Volscian city. Although derived from the Volscian language, it is not known what the meaning of the city's name was in Volscian... [more]
CORNIFICIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Cornificius. This name was borne by a Roman female poet and writer from the 1st century BC.
CORNIFICIUSmAncient Roman
From a Roman nomen gentile, which was derived from Latin cornificus "making horns", which itself was derived from Latin cornu "horn" and Latin facere "to make, to do". This name was borne by a Roman consul and a Roman poet, both of whom lived in the 1st century BC.
CORVUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin corvus "raven." Marcus Valerius Corvus was a Roman hero of the 4th century BC.
CRASSUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Latin adjective crassus, which can mean "solid, thick, dense" as well as "fat, gross, plump". This name was borne by several ancient Romans, such as the Roman general and politician Marcus Licinius Crassus (1st century BC).
CURIAfAncient Roman
Derived from the Roman gentile name Curius.
CURIUSmAncient Roman
The name of a Roman gens.... [more]
CURTIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin curtus "short."
DACIAfAncient Roman, Spanish
From the name of the region in what is now Romania. It is also the middle name of singer Paula DeAnda.
DECIUSmAncient Roman
Oscan equivalent of Decimus.
DENTATUSmAncient Roman
Dentatus is a Latin word meaning "toothed". It was given as a cognomen (byname) to a boy born with teeth in his mouth.... [more]
DIOCLETIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from the Greek name Diocles (see Diokles).
DRUSIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name derived from Drusus.
FAVIANmAncient Roman
This name is of Latin origin. The direct meaning is unclear but some potential meanings are: "understanding" , "brave man" as well as "man of wisdom." ... [more]
FAVONIUSmAncient Roman, Roman Mythology
Roman family name of disputed origin. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it is from Latin favere "to favor"; Ernest Klein says, by dissimilation from *fovonius, literally "the warming wind", from fovere "to warm"... [more]
FEROCIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Ferox.
FEROCILLAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Ferox.
FEROCINAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Ferox.
FEROXmAncient Roman, Pet
A Roman cognomen, meaning "wild, savage, ferocious." In his work De Re Rustica, the 1st century Roman writer Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella recommends this as a good name for dogs.
FLAMINIAfAncient Roman, Italian, German (Rare)
Feminine form of Flaminius. Derived from Latin flamen, which was a priest devoted to one of fifteen Roman gods.... [more]
FLAMINIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin "flamen," a priest devoted to one of fifteen Roman gods.... [more]
FULVIANUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Roman nomen gentile Fulvius. A bearer of this name was Roman praetor and consul Lucius Manlius Acidinus Fulvianus (2nd century BC).
FURIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Furius.
FURIUSmAncient Roman
From the Roman nomen Furius, which is derived from Latin furia "madness, fury, rage." This name was borne by a Roman statesman and soldier from the 4th century BC.
FUSCAfAncient Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Fuscus. This name was borne by saint Fusca of Ravenna, an Italian child martyr from the 3rd century AD.
FUSCIANUSmAncient Roman
Derived from a Roman cognomen or agnomen, which was derived from Fuscus. A bearer of this name was Publius Seius Fuscianus, who lived in the 2nd century AD and was a childhood friend of Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
FUSCINILLAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Fuscinillus. This name was borne by Seia Fuscinilla, daughter of Publius Seius Fuscianus and wife of Gaius Betitius Pius.
FUSCINUSmAncient Roman
Derived from a Roman cognomen, which itself was derived from Fuscus. A bearer of this name was Lucius Matuccius Fuscinus, who was consul suffectus in 159 AD.
FUSCUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin fuscus "dark, black". This name was borne by several ancient Romans, such as Arellius Fuscus (Roman orator) and Aristius Fuscus (friend of Roman poet Horace), both of which lived in the 1st century BC.
GALLICUSmAncient Roman
Borne by the 1st-century Roman senator Gaius Rutilius Gallicus.
GEMINUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin geminus "twin." This was the name of a Greek astronomer and mathematician from the 1st century BC. His true Greek name is unknown but it was probably analogous to his Latin name of Geminus (and so his true name might have been Didymos).
GENESIUSmAncient Roman, Late Roman
From Greek Γενέσιος, (cognate with Genesis), meaning origin, beginning. This was the name of various Christian saints, most notably Genesius of Rome, the patron saint of actors.
GOTHICUSmAncient Roman
There was a Roman Emperor called Claudius Gothicus. After a victory, he had earned the surname of "Gothicus" meaning he was the "conqueror of the Goths".
GRUMIOmAncient Roman (Rare, Archaic), Literature
This name is found in Shakespeare's 'The Taming of the Shrew' and in the Cambridge Latin Course.
HERCULINAfPopular Culture, Ancient Roman, English (American)
Feminine form of Hercules,a name of an asteroid and a DC character
HERIUSmAncient Roman
Oscan praenomen also used in Ancient Rome. ... [more]
HOSTILIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin hostilis "hostile." This name was borne by Tullus Hostilius, a legendary Roman king from the 7th century BC.
INGENUUSmAncient Roman
From Latin ingenuus meaning "freeman".
INVIDIAfAncient Roman, Roman Mythology
This was the Roman equal of demigoddess Nemesis, who ruled over revenge. From the Latin word invidere meaning "to look against, to look at in a hostile manner."
INVIDIUSmAncient Roman
Masculine form of Invidia.
IOULIAfAncient Roman (Hellenized), Greek
Hellenized form of Iulia (see Julia).
IOULIANAfAncient Roman (Hellenized), Greek
Hellenized form of Iuliana (see Juliana).
IOULIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iulianus (see Julian).
IOULIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized), Greek
Hellenized form of Iulius (see Julius).
IOUNIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iunius (see Junius).
IUVENTASfAncient Roman
Original Latin version of JUVENTAS
JANUARIAfAncient Roman, Polish
Feminine form of Januarius. This was the name of an early Christian martyr.
JUSTINUSmAncient Roman
From the Latin name Iustinus, which was derived from JUSTUS.... [more]
KAIKILIAfAncient Roman (Hellenized), Greek
Hellenized form of Caecilia (see Cecilia).
KASSIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Cassianus (see Cassian).
KELSOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek
Hellenized form of Celsus. This name was borne by a Greek philosopher from the 2nd century AD.
KOINTILIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Quintilianus (see Quintilian). This name was borne by a Greek author who lived sometime between the 2nd century AD and the 3rd century AD.
KOUINTOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Variant form of Kointos, which is the main Greek form of Quintus.
KRISPINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Crispinus (see Crispin).
LAURENTIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Laurentius (see Laurence(1)). Also take a look at Lavrentios, which is the modern Greek spelling of this name.
LEPIDAfAncient Roman
"Pleasant" or "charming". Roman patrician name from the gens Aemilius; feminine of Lepidus.
LICINIAfAncient Roman, Italian, Emilian, Spanish
Feminine form of Licinius. A known bearer of this name was Licinia Eudoxia, a Roman empress from the 5th century AD.
LICINIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was derived from the Roman cognomen Licinus, which itself was derived from the Latin adjective licinus meaning "bent, turned upward, upturned". Also compare the Latin verb licinio meaning "to show through, to disclose".... [more]
LIVILLAfAncient Roman
Roman diminutive of Livia. It was a family nickname for the elder sister of the Roman emperor Claudius, Livia Julia (c.13 BC-31 AD), apparently called Livilla "little Livia" in order to distinguish her from her grandmother and namesake, Livia (wife of Augustus).
LOLLIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Lollius. Famous bearer Lollia Paulina (d. 49 CE) was briefly the wife of the Roman emperor Caligula. She was charged with sorcery in 49 CE and exiled without trial. Once in exile, she was forced to commit suicide.
LOLLIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name of unknown meaning, possibly of Sabine origin. Alternatively it could be derived from Latin lolium "darnel", darnel being a type of grass.
LONGINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Longinus. This name was borne by a Greek literary critic and writer from the 1st century AD and also by a Greek rhetorician and critic from the 3rd century AD.
LUCILLIUSmAncient Roman
Variant spelling of Lucilius. This name was borne by a satirical poet who lived under the Roman emperor Nero in the first century AD.
LUCILLUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Lucius (or in other words, this is the masculine form of Lucilla).
LUCINUSmAncient Roman
Masculine form of Lucina. This name is not to be confused with Licinius and Luscinus.
LUCIOLAfAncient Roman
Diminutive of Lucia, as -ola is a Latin feminine diminutive suffix. In other words: this given name is the feminine equivalent of Luciolus.
LUCIOLUSmAncient Roman
Diminutive of Lucius, as -olus is a Latin masculine diminutive suffix.... [more]
LUCULLUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from a diminutive (as -ullus is a Latin masculine diminutive suffix) of either the given name Lucius or of the Latin noun lucus meaning "grove" (see Lucina)... [more]
LUPAfAncient Roman
The name of an ancient Roman Wolf Goddess who has a similar name as lupus, meaning 'wolf' in Latin
LUSCINUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin luscinus meaning "one-eyed", which itself is ultimately derived from the Latin adjective luscus meaning "one-eyed, half blind" (see Luscus)... [more]
LUSCUSmAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Latin adjective luscus meaning "one-eyed, half blind".... [more]
LUTATIUSmAncient Roman
From the Roman nomen gentile Lutatius, which is also found spelled as Luctatius. Its etymology is a little bit uncertain, but it is probably derived from the Latin noun luctatio meaning "a wrestling" as well as "struggle, contest, fight", which itself is ultimately derived from the Latin verb luctor meaning "to wrestle, to struggle, to fight"... [more]
MACCIUSmAncient Roman
An Ancient Roman family name.
MAMERCAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Mamercus.
MAMERCUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen which is either a variant of Marcus or derived from Mamers, the Oscan version of Mars.
MARTINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized), Greek (Rare)
Hellenized form of Martinus (see Martin).
MARTIUSmAncient Roman
Meaning "of mars" which is the original form of the month March. Also the name of a sixth century saint.
MARULLUSmAncient Roman
The name of a Ancient Roman senator who was among the Senators who feared that Julius Caesar was becoming too powerful. In the play that playwright and poet William Shakespeare wrote based on the last days of Caesar, he and Flavius force citizens praising Caesar off the streets and taking decorations off statues in about the beginning of the play.
MATERNUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin maternus "maternal, motherly." This name was borne by two saints from the 3rd and 4th centuries AD.
MATURINUSmAncient Roman
Possibly derived from Latin maturus meaning "mature".
MAXENTIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Maxentius (see Maxence).
MEMMIUSmAncient Roman
This is the name of a fourth century saint. His sister, Poma, is also venerated as a saint.
MERULAf & mAncient Roman
Roman cognomen which meant "blackbird" from Latin merulus (cognate to French Merle).
MESSALAmAncient Roman, Literature
Character from The Hunger Games-Mockingjay
MESSALINAfAncient Roman, Italian, Spanish, Catalan
Feminine diminutive of the Roman family name Messalla, which was originally an agnomen derived from the place name Messana, applied to the 3rd-century BC Roman general Manius Valerius Maximus Corvinus to commemorate his victory at the city of Messana in Sicily... [more]
METTIUSmAncient Roman
Roman praenomen possibly derived from the Oscan word meddix meaning "magistrar".
MUCIAfAncient Roman
Ancient Roman gens (family name), feminine form of Mucius. It was borne by matron Mucia Tertia in the 1st Century BCE. For a time she was married to Pompey, with whom she had three children.
MUCIUSmAncient Roman
Ancient Roman gens name. The feminine form of this name is Mucia.
NAEVIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Naevius.
NATALISmAncient Roman, Polish
Means "birth" in Latin. It's also the Polish masculine form of Natalia.
NAUCRATIUSmAncient Roman
An Orthodox saint in the 4th century. Son of Ss. Emmelia and Basil the Elder, and brother to St. Basil the Great, Ss. Theosebia and Gregory of Nyssa, and St. Macrina the younger.
NECESSITASfAncient Roman, Roman Mythology
Ancient roman form of Ananke the goddess of necessity
NECESSITUSmAncient Roman
Male form of the roman goddess Necessitas
NERIUSmAncient Roman
An Oscan prenomen meaning "strong, vigorous" (related to the Latin prenomen Nero).... [more]
NERONmAncient Roman (Hellenized), Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Polish, Russian, Serbian, Ukrainian
Hellenized form of Nero as well as the Bosnian, Bulgarian, Croatian, Polish, Russian, Serbian and Ukrainian form of the name.
NEROUAmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Nerva. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
NERVASmAncient Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek, Greek
Late Greek and modern Greek form of Neroua, which is the ancient Greek form of Nerva.
NUMERIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin numerus "number" or Latin numerare "to count, to number, to pay."
NYMPHIASmAncient Roman
Roman surname which supposedly meant "descended from a nymph", derived from Latin nympha "bride" or "nymph" (see Nympha).
OPIMIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Opimius. This was the name of a Vestal Virgin who died in 216 BC, after having been accused of having broken her vow of chastity.
OPIMIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile which is derived from the Latin adjective opimus which can mean "fat, plump, corpulent, rich" (in reference to a person) as well as "fertile, fruitful" (in reference to land)... [more]
OPITERmAncient Roman
Archaic Roman praenomen which had already fallen out of use by the 1st century BC. It was typically given to a son that had been born after the death of his father, while the son's paternal grandfather was still alive... [more]
OPITERNIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was derived from Opiter. A bearer of this name was Lucius Opiternius, a Faliscan priest of Bacchus from the 2nd century BC.
OPPIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Oppius.
OPPIUSmAncient Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was originally a praenomen; it is the latinized form of the Oscan praenomen Úppiis. Since Oscan is a language that has long been extinct and modern knowledge of its vocabulary is limited, it is uncertain what the meaning of the name was... [more]
ORESTILLAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of the Roman cognomen Orestillus, which was a diminutive of Orestes. It was borne by Livia Orestilla, the second wife of Emperor Caligula.
OUALENTINAfAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valentina. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUALENTINIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valentinianus. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUALENTINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valentinus (see Valentine(1)). Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUALERIAfAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valeria. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUALERIANAfAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valeriana. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUALERIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valerianus. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUALERIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Valerius. Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
OUESPASIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Greek form of Vespasianus (see Vespasian).
PAULINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Paulinus (see Paulino).
PERTINAXmAncient Roman, History, Literature
Derived from Latin pertinax "persistent, stubborn." This name was borne by a Roman Emperor from the 2nd century AD.... [more]
PHABIANOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Fabianus (see Fabian).
PHABRIKIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Fabricius (see Fabrice).
PHAUSTINOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Faustinus (see Faustino).
PICTORmAncient Roman
From the Roman cognomen Pictor, which is derived from Latin pictor "painter." Quintus Fabius Pictor was a Roman historian from the 3rd century BC.
PLACIDIAfEnglish (Puritan), African, Ancient Roman
Comes from the word placid meaning 'calm' and 'peaceful'.
PLAUTUSmAncient Roman, Ancient Roman (Anglicized)
Roman cognomen possibly meaning either "flat-footed" or "flat-eared" in Latin.... [more]
POMPEIAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Pompeius.
POMPOmAncient Roman
Oscan equivalent of Quintus.
POPLIOSmAncient Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek
Late Greek form of Publius. In other words, you could say that this name is a late Greek variant of Poublios.
POPPAEAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Poppaeus. Poppaea Sabina was the second wife of Nero.
POPPAEUSmAncient Roman
Roman gens name of uncertain origin. It may be related to Latin populus "people".
PORTIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin portus "port, harbour". Also note that there are instances where this name is a misspelling of Porcius.
POTENTIUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin potens "powerful."
PROCULAfAncient Roman
Feminine form of Proculus.
PROPERTIUSmAncient Roman
Roman family name which was probably derived from Latin propero "to make haste, to be quick". Sextus Aurelius Propertius, better known as Propertius, was a 1st-century BC Roman poet. He was a contemporary of Virgil and Ovid.
PTOLEMOCRATIAfAncient Roman
Roman feminine given name derived from the Greek πολεμηιος (polemeios) meaning "aggressive" or "warlike" and κρατος (kratos) meaning "power". This was the name of a character in the play Rudens of Plautus.
PUPILLUSmAncient Roman
Derived from Latin pupillus "orphan, minor, little boy", which is a diminutive of Latin pupus "boy." Lucius Orbilius Pupillus was a grammarian from the 1st century BC.
QUADRATILLAfAncient Roman
Roman cognomen, meaning "quartered" and used as a feminine form of Quadratus. ... [more]