Late Roman Submitted Names

Late Roman names were used in the early Christian Roman Empire. They formed after Ancient Roman names.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABUNDANTIA f Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Abundantius. She was the Roman personification of abundance, prosperity and good fortune, portrayed as distributing grain and money from a cornucopia. (The mythological character has survived in French folklore as Lady Hobunde.) The name was also borne by an Italian saint martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian.
ABUNDANTIUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin abundans "overflowing, abundant". This was the name of several Christian saints.
ABUNDIUS m Late Roman
From Latin abundiantus "abundant, plentiful". This was the name of several early saints.
ACARIUS m Late Roman
Name of a saint, Saint Acarius who was bishop of Doornik and Noyon.
ACTIUS m Late Roman
Name for someone from Actium.
ACUTIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Acutius.
ADAUCTA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Adauctus.
ADAUCTUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin adauctus meaning "augmented, increased". This was the name of a Christian martyr and saint from the 4th century AD.
ADELPHIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Adelphus.
ALEXIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Alexius.
AMADEA f Late Roman, German, Italian
Feminine form of Amadeus.
AMANDIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Amandus.
AMANTIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Amantius.
AMASIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Amasius. This name was borne by an obscure saint from the 1st century AD, who was the very first bishop of the Italian coastal city of Taranto.
AMMIANA f Late Roman, Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of Ammianus. It might also be interesting to know that Ammiana was the name of one of the islands in the Venetian lagoon, which sank after the Christmas Day earthquake in 1223 AD.
AMMIANUS m Late Roman, Late Greek (Latinized), History
From the late Roman cognomen Ammianus, which is of uncertain origin and meaning, but it is noteworthy that all of the bearers known to history are of Byzantine Greek descent. As such, the original form of the name must have been Ἀμμιανός (Ammianos), which thus means that Ammianus is a latinization of the original name.... [more]
ANATOLIANA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Anatolianus.
ANATOLIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Anatolius.
ANGELINUS m Late Roman, Dutch
Masculine form of Angelina.
ARIDIUS m Late Roman
This name was borne by Quintus Aridius Rufinus, a Roman consul from the early 3rd century. His name may possibly have been derived from Latin aridus meaning "dry, arid, parched". But as it is possible that he may have been a Gallo-Roman instead of a pure Roman, Aridius could also be the latinized form of a Gaulish name... [more]
ARRUNTIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Arruntius.
ASTIUS m Late Roman
There was a saint of this name called Saint Astius.
AUDAX m Late Roman
Derived from Latin audax "audacious, daring, bold, courageous." This name was borne by a saint from the 3rd century AD.
AUFIDIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Aufidius.
AUGUSTANA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Augustanus.
AUGUSTANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Augustus. This name was borne by a Roman first consul from the 2nd century AD.
AUREUS m Late Roman
Means "golden, gilded" in Latin, from aurum "gold" (see Aurea). An aureus was also a gold coin of ancient Rome, equivalent to 25 denarii. This was the name of a Christian saint who was martyred in the 5th century with his sister Saint Justina at the cathedral of Mainz in Germany; they were killed by invading Huns while celebrating Mass.
AURIAN m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin word Aurum meaning "gold" or Aureus meaning "golden"
AUSPICIUS m Late Roman
Meaning Unknown. Auspicius of Trier was a 2nd century Christian saint.
AUXILIA f Late Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of Auxilius. In some cases, the name can also be a short form of Auxiliadora.
AUXILIUS m Late Roman
From the Roman cognomen Auxilius, which was derived from the Latin noun auxilium meaning "help, aid, assistance". The noun itself is ultimately derived from the Latin verb auxilior meaning "to give help, to aid, to assist"... [more]
BERENICIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the feminine first name Berenice. A bearer of this name was Gaius Julius Alexander Berenicianus, a Cilician prince from the 2nd century AD.
BIKTOR m Late Roman (Hellenized), Georgian (Rare), Greek (Rare)
Late Greek form of Victor, as well as the original Georgian form of Victor. Biktor is considered an old and rare name in both Georgia and Greece. In Georgia, this is because Viktor has become the dominant form there, probably due to the influence that Russia has had on the country... [more]
BIRILLUS m Late Roman
There was a saint of this name called Birillus of Antioch.
BRANCATIUS m Late Roman
Corrupted form of Pancratius. Saint Pancratius of Taormina was venerated under this name in early medieval Sicily.
BURRUS m Late Roman
This is a name of an adviser of Emperor Nero, But the full name was Sextus Afranius Burrus.
BYZANTINUS m Late Roman
Means "from Byzantium", with Byzantium being the latinized form of Greek Byzantion, which itself was ultimately derived from the personal name Byzas. This name was borne by Stephanus Byzantinus, who lived in the 6th century AD.
BYZANTIUS m Late Roman
Latinized form of Greek Byzantios, which essentially meant "from Byzantium" (see also Byzantinus). This was the name of an archbishop of Bari (Italy) from the 11th century AD.
CAECILIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Caecilius.
CAELESTIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Caelestius.
CAELESTIUS m Late Roman
Late Roman variant of Caelestis. This was the name of an important follower of the Christian teacher Pelagius and the Christian doctrine of Pelagianism, who lived in the 5th century AD. The doctrine was considered to be heretical at the time and so Caelestius and his teacher were also seen as heretics.
CAELIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Roman nomen gentile Caelius.
CAESARIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Caesarius.
CALASANCTIUS m Late Roman
The meaning of the first element of this name is unknown to me, but the second element is probably derived from Latin sanctus "sacred, holy".
CALLINICA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Callinicus. This was the name of a Christian martyr from the 3rd century AD.
CALOCERUS m Late Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Variant spelling of Calocaerus, which is the latinized form of the Greek given name Kalokairos. Due to the similarities in appearance and pronunciation, this name is often confused with the name Calogerus (see Calogero).... [more]
CANDIDIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Candidus. A known bearer of this name was Gaius Valerius Candidianus, the illegitimate son of Roman Emperor Galerius (4th century AD).
CANTIANILLA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Cantianillus. This was the name of a saint from the 4th century AD, who was martyred along with her brothers Cantius and Cantianus.
CANTIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Cantius. This was the name of a saint from the 4th century AD, who was martyred along with his brother Cantius and sister Cantianilla.
CANTIDIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Cantidius.
CANTIDIUS m Late Roman
Possibly derived from Latin cantidus, which in turn may have been derived from Latin cantus "(a) singing, song". This was the name of a saint who was martyred in Antioch (the exact year remains unknown).
CANTIUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin cantus "(a) singing, song". This was the name of a saint from the 4th century AD, who was martyred along with his brother Cantianus and sister Cantianilla.
CAPITON m Late Roman
Derived from Latin capitonis, which is the genitive of Latin capito meaning "big-headed" (also see Capito). A bearer of this name was Capiton of Cherson, a fairly obscure saint (and hieromartyr) from the 4th century AD.
CAPRASIUS m Late Roman
Possibly derived from Latin capra meaning "(she-)goat". A bearer of this name was Caprasius of Agen, a French saint from the early 4th century AD.
CARINUS m Late Roman, History
Extended form of Carus. This name was borne by a Roman emperor from the 3rd century AD.
CARITAS f Late Roman
Variant of Carita, a direct transcription from the Latin.
CARMINIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was probably derived from Latin carminum "song, poem", which is a Late Latin form of carmen "song, poem" (see also Carmen). Improbable is a derivation from Latin carminus, which is the shortened form of carmesinus (a corruption of cremesinus, the latinized form of Arabic qermez "red")... [more]
CASSIODORUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Late Roman, History
Latinized form of Kassiodoros. A well-known bearer of this name was Cassiodorus, a Roman statesman and writer from the 6th century AD.
CASTRENSIS m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin adjective castrensis meaning "of the camp, in the camp", which is ultimately derived from the Latin noun castra meaning "(military) camp, encampment".... [more]
CASTRINUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin castrum "fortress, camp, castle".
CASTULUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin castus "pure, chaste, virtuous". This was the name of a Roman saint from the 3rd century AD.
CELEDONIUS m Late Roman
Latin form of the Greek name Khelidónios. It is the name of a Roman legionary who was martyred with his friend or brother Emeterius around 300 CE and is now a Catholic Saint. They are the patron saints of the city of Calahorra, La Rioja, where they are purported to have died... [more]
CELERINA f Late Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Celerinus.
CHLORUS m Late Roman
Latinized form of the Greek word khlôros "pale green" (see also Chloris). This name was borne by a Western Roman emperor from the 3rd century AD.
CLAUDIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Claudius.
CLEMENTINUS m Late Roman
Longer form of Clementius. This name was borne by Sextus Catius Clementinus Priscillianus, a Roman consul and senator from the 3rd century AD.
COMMODIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen, which is an extended form of Commodus. This name was borne by a Christian Latin poet from the 3rd century AD.
COMMODUS m Late Roman, History
Derived from the Latin word commodus, which can mean "suitable, convenient, opportune" as well as "full, complete, of full weight". The word is ultimately derived from Latin com "with, together" and modus "measure, manner"... [more]
CONCORDIUS m Late Roman
This was the name of a Christian saint known as Concordius of Spoleto.
CORDUS m Late Roman
From a Roman cognomen that was probably derived from Latin cordus, which is a variant form of Latin chordus meaning "late-born" as well as "late in the season". Another possibility is that the name was derived from Latin corda, which is a variant form of chorda, the latinized form of Greek khorda or khorde meaning "cord, string".... [more]
CORNELIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Cornelius. A bearer of this name was the Roman rhetorician Sulpicius Cornelianus, who lived in the 2nd century AD.
CORVINUS m Late Roman, German, German (Swiss)
Diminutive of Corvus. A bearer of this name was Marcus Valerius Messalla Corvinus, a Roman general from the 1st century AD.
CRISPIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Crispus or otherwise a shorter form of Crispinianus.
CRISPINIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Crispinus.
CRUCIFICIA f Late Roman, Italian, Spanish
Earliest known usage stemmed from the mid 4th century in Rome, following the rule of Constantine. The meaning of the name is "Crucifixion."
DALMATIUS m Late Roman, Dutch (?), German (?)
From Latin Dalmatius meaning "Dalmatian, of Dalmatia". This was the name of a 4th-century Roman emperor who was a nephew of Constantine. It was also borne by several early saints.
DANIHELUS m Late Roman
Latinate form of Daniel.
DECENTIUS m Late Roman
Probably derived from the Latin noun decentia meaning "decency, comeliness", which is related to Latin decens "fitting, appropriate, decent, worthy". Both words are ultimately derived from the Latin verb decēre "to be fitting, to be suitable, to be worthy"... [more]
DEOGRATIAS m Late Roman
Means "thanks to God" or "grace of God", derived from Latin deus "god" combined with Latin gratia "thanks, grace". A bearer of this name was saint Deogratias of Carthage (5th century AD).
DEOGRATIUS m Late Roman
Variant form of Deogratias.
DIADUMENIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen, which is an extended form of Diadumenus.
DIADUMENUS m Late Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Greek διαδούμενος (diadoumenos) or (diadumenos), which apparently means "diadem-bearer" but is more likely to mean "diadem of strength". The word is derived from Greek διάδημα (diadema) "diadem, crown, ornamental headband" combined with Greek μενος (menos) "power, strength, spirit"... [more]
DOMETIAN m Late Roman (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of Dometianus. In other words, one could say that this name is a variant form of Domitian. A known bearer of this name was saint Dometian, who was bishop of Melitene (now Malatya in Turkey) in the 6th century AD.
DOMETIANUS m Late Roman
Variant form of Domitianus (see Domitian). Also compare Dometius.
DOMETIUS m Late Roman
This name is perhaps best known for being the name of saint Dometius of Persia (4rd century AD), who is also frequently mentioned as Domitius in relevant sources. Since most sources claim that the name Dometius is of Latin origin and virtually means "to tame", it is most likely a variant form of the name Domitius... [more]
DOMNA f Late Roman, Georgian (Rare), Greek
Feminine form of Domnus. Known bearers of this name include Julia Domna, the wife of Roman Emperor Septimius Severus (3rd century AD), and Domna Samiou (1928-2012), a prominent Greek researcher and performer of Greek folk music.
DOMNICA f Romanian, Moldovan, Late Roman (?)
Romanian and Moldovan variant of Dominika.
DOMNINA f Late Roman
Diminutive form of Domna, but one can also consider it the feminine form of Domninus. This name was borne by several saints and martyrs.
DOMNINUS m Late Roman
Diminutive form of Domnus. A known bearer of this name was Domninus of Larissa, a Hellenistic Syrian mathematician from the 5th century AD.
DOMNUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin domnus meaning "lord, master", which is a shortened form of Latin dominus meaning "master, lord, ruler". It is etymologically related to Latin domus meaning "house, building, mansion"... [more]
DONATILLA f Late Roman
Diminutive of Donata. Also compare Donatella, which is basically a younger form of the name.... [more]
DONATIUS m Late Roman, Dutch (Rare)
Derivative of Donatus (see Donato). A known bearer of this name was Donatius Victoria, a politician from the island of Ceylon (which is now known as Sri Lanka).
DOSITHEUS m Late Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Dositheos. Bearers of this name include the Samaritan Dositheus (1st century AD) and the Greek-born Roman grammarian Dositheus Magister (4th century AD).
DULCINA f Late Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of Dulcinus.
DULCINUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin dulcis meaning "sweet" combined with the Latin (masculine) diminutive suffix -inus. A known bearer of this name was Dulcinus of Novara (c. 1250-1307), who was also known as Fra Dolcino... [more]
EGNATIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Egnatius.
ELGONIUS m Late Roman
Latin form of Elgin.
EMERENTIA f Late Roman, Dutch, German (Rare), Swedish (Rare), Judeo-Christian Legend
Feminine form of Emerentius. This name belonged to an early Christian martyr, and is also assigned to the mother of Saint Anna and grandmother of the Virgin Mary in some late 15th-century European traditions.
EMERENTIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Emerentius.
EMERITA f Late Roman, Various, English (British)
Derived from Latin emeritus "earned, completed one's service" (past participle form of emereo; see Emerentius). This was the name of a Roman-era saint, martyred with Saint Digna in 259... [more]
EMETERIUS m Late Roman
Latin form of the Greek name Emitherios. It is the name of a Roman legionary who was martyred with his friend or brother Celedonius around 300 CE and is now a Catholic Saint. They are the patron saints of the city of Calahorra, La Rioja, where they are purported to have died... [more]
ENGRATIA f Late Roman
Latin name meaning "in (a state of) grace". This was the name of two Spanish martyrs.
EPHESIA f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology, Late Roman
Feminine form of Ephesius. In Greek mythology this was an epithet of the goddess Artemis meaning "of Ephesus", Ephesus being a city in Asia Minor famous for a temple dedicated to Artemis, which was one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
EUPHEMIANUS m Late Roman, Late Greek (Latinized)
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Greek personal name Euphemios via its latinized form Euphemius. This name was borne by a female saint from the 9th century AD, who used this name as a pseudonym, in order to disguise herself as a male.
EVANGELICUS m Late Roman, Late Greek (Latinized)
Derived from the Latin adjective evangelicus meaning "evangelical". It is a latinization of the Greek adjective εὐαγγελικός (euangelikos), which originally meant "relating to good news" (see Euangelios) but came to mean "relating to the gospel" in the Christian era.... [more]
EVELLIUS m Late Roman
There was a saint of this name known as Saint Evellius.
EXPEDITUS m Late Roman, History
From the Latin past participle of expidere "make fit or ready, prepare", literally "free the feet from fetters". This was the name of an obscure, semi-legendary saint, who is invoked against procrastination.
EXUPERANTIA f Late Roman
Variant of Exsuperantia, which is derived from the Latin noun exsuperantia "preeminence, superiority, superfluity". The noun itself is ultimately derived from exsuperans "surpassing (greatly), exceeding (greatly), surmounting (greatly)", which belongs to the verb exsupero (see Exuperius for more)... [more]
EXUPERANTIUS m Late Roman
Masculine form of Exuperantia. A bearer of this name was Saint Exuperantius of Cingoli, who lived and died in the 5th century BC.
EXUPERIA f Late Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of Exuperius.
EXUPERIUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Exsuperius, which was derived from the Latin verb exsupero "to (greatly) excel, to (greatly) surpass, to (greatly) surmount". The verb itself is ultimately derived from the Latin elements ex "out of, from within" and supero "to surpass, to surmount, to transcend"... [more]
FABRICIANA f Late Roman, Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Feminine form of Fabricianus. In modern times, this name is used primarily in Brazil.
FABRICIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Fabricius.
FAUSTIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Faustus. A bearer of this name was Lucius Mummius Faustianus, a Roman consul from the 3rd century AD.
FAUSTINIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Faustinus. A bearer of this name was Lucius Iulius Faustinianus, a Roman legate in Moesia who lived during the reign of Septimius Severus.
FEBRONIA f Spanish, Late Roman, Polish, Italian
Possibly from Februa, Februalia or Februatio, different names for the same Roman purification festival which was held during the month of February. The festival and the month were both named for the Latin word februum "purging, purification", which was probably from a lost Sabine word itself descended from a reduplication of the Proto-Indo-European word *dhes-.... [more]
FELICISSIMUS m Late Roman
Means "happiest" in Latin.
FERREOLUS m Late Roman
A diminutive of the name Ferrus, which was derived from Latin ferrum meaning "iron, sword" (compare Ferruccio). This is the name of several early saints.
FIRMATUS m History, Medieval English (Latinized, ?), Late Roman (?), Old Norman (?)
Derived from Latin firmatus meaning "firmed, strengthened", itself a derivative of firmus "firm, strong, enduring, stable" (making it a cognate of Firminus; also compare Firmus). This was borne by Firmatus the deacon, an obscure early Christian martyr... [more]
FLORENS m Late Roman, Dutch (Rare), German (Rare)
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin florens meaning "prosperous, flourishing" (see Florence).... [more]
FLORENTIANA f Late Roman, Dutch (Rare)
Feminine form of Florentianus. This name is not to be confused with the similar-looking name Florentina.
FLORENTIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Florentius (see Florence). This name is not to be confused with the similar-looking name Florentinus.... [more]
FLORIDA f Late Roman, Albanian, Italian (Rare), English (American), Spanish (Latin American), Louisiana Creole
Feminine form of Floridus. This is also the name of a state in the United States of America, which was originally named La Florida by the Spanish explorer Juan Ponce de León (1474-1521). He so named it because he discovered it during the Easter season, which is called Pascua Florida in Spanish... [more]
FLORIDUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Latin adjective floridus meaning "flowery, blooming, florid".
FLORIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was derived from Florus.
FORMOSUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin formosus "beautiful, graceful, well-shaped." This name was borne by a pope from the 9th century AD.
FORTUNATIANUS m Late Roman
This Roman cognomen is an extended form of Fortunatus. Bearers of this name include the Latin grammarian and metrician Atilius Fortunatianus (4th century AD) and the Roman rhetorician Gaius Chirius Fortunatianus (4th century AD).
FRONTINA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Frontinus.
FRONTINIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Frontinus. A known bearer of this name was Decimus Fonteius Frontinianus Lucius Stertinius Rufus, a Roman who was the military governor of Numidia from 159 AD to 160 AD.... [more]
FRONTINUS m Late Roman
From the Roman cognomen Frontinus, which essentially means "one with a small forehead", as it is composed of Latin fronto meaning "one with a large forehead" (see Fronto) combined with the Latin masculine diminutive suffix -inus.... [more]
FRONTO m Late Roman
From the Roman cognomen Fronto, which was derived from Latin fronto meaning "one with a large forehead". The latter is ultimately derived from the Latin noun frons meaning "forehead, brow" as well as "front".... [more]
FURIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Furius.
GAIANOS m Late Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek
This name can be the hellenized form of Gaianus as well as an extended form of Gaios.
GAIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Gaius. This was the name of a martyr in early Christianity.
GAUDENTIA f Late Roman, Dutch (Rare)
Feminine form of Gaudentius. This name was most notably borne by a virgin martyr and saint, who was put to death (along with three others) during the early persecution of Christians.
GAUDENTIUS m Late Roman, Dutch
Derived from Latin gaudere "to rejoice." This name was borne by a saint from the 5th century AD.
GEMINIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Geminius.
GEMINIUS m Late Roman
Variant of Geminus. This name was borne by at least one Roman senator.
GENEROSA f Late Roman, Neapolitan, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of Generosus. This name was borne by Generosa of Scillium, a martyr and saint from the 2nd century AD.
GENEROSUS m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin adjective generosus meaning "of noble birth, well-born, noble".... [more]
GENESIUS m Ancient Roman, Late Roman
From Greek Γενέσιος, (cognate with Genesis), meaning origin, beginning. This was the name of various Christian saints, most notably Genesius of Rome, the patron saint of actors.
GENTIANUS m Late Roman
Derived from a Roman cognomen or agnomen, which in turn was derived from Gentius. Bearers of this name include Hedius Lollianus Terentius Gentianus (Roman politician and senator) and Decimus Terentius Gentianus (Roman politician and senator).
GENTILIS m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin adjective gentilis meaning "of the same family". This name is best known for having been the name of the Blessed Gentilis, a medieval Franciscan missionary from Matelica in Italy who was beheaded in 1340 in the Persian city of Tauris (which is nowadays Tabriz in Iran)... [more]
GETULIUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Gaetulius, a name that has two possible etymological origins. One is that it means "inhabitant of Gaeta", which is an Italian city that ultimately derives its name from Greek kaiétas meaning "cave"... [more]
GNAEA f Late Roman
Feminization of Gnaeus.
GRATIUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin gratia meaning "grace", which thus makes this name the masculine form of Gratia.... [more]
HERODIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Herodes (see Herod).
HILARIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Hilarius. This name was borne by a Roman procurator (i.e. provincial governor) from the 3rd century AD.
HONORATIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Honoratus. This name was borne by a Gallo-Roman consul from the 3rd century AD.
HORATIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Horatius.
HOSTA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Hostus.
HOSTIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Hostus.
HOSTILIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Hostilius.
HYPATIUS m Late Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Hypatios. Bearers of this name include Roman senator Flavius Hypatius (4th century AD) and saint Hypatius of Gangra (4th century AD).
ICARIUS m Late Roman
The father of Penelope, or an alternative spelling for Icarus.
INNOCENTIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Innocentius.
IOUNIANOS m Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iunianus (see Junianus).
IOUOUENTIOS m Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iuventius (see Juventius). Also compare the names Silvanus and Silouanos, which show that the letter -v- was usually hellenized to -ou- by the ancient Greeks.
IOUSTA f Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iusta (see Justa).
IOUSTINA f Late Roman (Hellenized), Greek (Rare)
Hellenized form of Iustina (see Justina).
IOUSTINIANOS m Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iustinianus (see Justinian).
IOUSTINOS m Late Roman (Hellenized), Greek
Hellenized form of Iustinus (see Justin).
IOUSTOS m Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Iustus (see Justus).
IOUVENTIOS m Late Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek, Greek
Late Greek and modern Greek form of Iououentios, which is the ancient Greek form of Juventius.
JACOMINUS m Late Roman, Dutch
Lengthened form of Jacomus.
JOTAPIANUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Iotapianus, which was a Roman cognomen that in turn was derived from the feminine name Iotapa. A known bearer of this name was Marcus Fulvius Rufus Jotapianus, a Roman usurper from the 3rd century AD.
JOVIANUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Iovianus, which is an extended form of Iovis (see Jove).
JOVINIANUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Iovinianus, which is an extended form of Iovinus. Iovinus was a Roman cognomen that was in turn derived from Iovis (see Jove).
JUNIAN m Late Roman (Anglicized), English
Anglicized form of Iunianus (see Junianus). This name was borne by two early medieval saints.
JUNIANA f Late Roman, Dutch (Archaic)
Variant spelling of Iuniana, which is the feminine form of Iunianus (see Junianus).
JUNIANUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of the Roman cognomen Iunianus, which was derived from Iunius (see Junius).
JUSTA f Late Roman, Spanish
Feminine form of Justus.
JUSTIANUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Iustianus, which is an extended form of Iustus (see Justus). Also compare Iustinianus (see Justinian), which is the extended form of Iustinus (see Justin).
JUSTINIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of the name Justinus (see Justin).
JUVENTIUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of Iuventius, which is derived from the Latin noun iuventus meaning "youth". Also compare Juventas, which is etymologically related and also has the same meaning.... [more]
KOUIRINOS m Roman Mythology (Hellenized), Late Roman (Hellenized)
Variant form of Kyrinos, which is the main Greek form of Quirinus.
LAELIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Laelius. A bearer of this name was Ulpius Cornelius Laelianus, a Gaulish usurper (presumably of Roman descent) from the 3rd century AD.
LAUDATUS m Late Roman, Welsh (Latinized)
Derived from Latin laudatus meaning "praised, lauded, commended, esteemed", which is ultimately derived from Latin laudo meaning "to praise, to laud, to commend".... [more]
LAURIANA f Late Roman, Dutch
Feminine form of Laurianus. However, in modern times, it can be a blend of the names Laura and Ana in some cases.
LAURIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Laurus. This name was borne by a saint from the 6th century AD.
LAURINUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Laurus.
LEONIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Leonius. This name was borne by a saint from the 6th century AD.
LICINIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Licinius. Known bearers of this name include the Roman author Granius Licinianus (2nd century AD) and the Roman usurper Julius Valens Licinianus (3rd century AD).
LILIOSA f Late Roman
Feminine diminutive of Latin lilium "a lily". This name belonged to an Iberian Christian woman martyred in Córdoba, Andalusia c.852 under Emir Abd ar-Rahman II, along with her husband Felix, his cousin Aurelius and Aurelius' wife Natalia.
LOUKANOS m Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Lucanus (see Lucan).
LUCENTIUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin lucens meaning "shining", which makes this name etymologically related to Lucius.... [more]
LUCIDIUS m Late Roman
Variant form of Lucidus. This name was borne by saint Lucidius of Verona, whose feast day is on April 26th.
LUCIDUS m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin adjective lucidus meaning "clear, bright, shining". This name was borne by the 10th-century saint Lucidus of Aquara.
LUCILIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Roman nomen gentile Lucilius. Bearers of this name were Egnatius Lucilianus, a governor of Britannia Inferior (between AD 238 and 244) and Claudius Lucilianus, a Roman prefect from the 2nd century AD.
LUPATUS m Late Roman
Derivative of Latin lupus, meaning "wolf".
LUPICINUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin lupus "wolf". A known bearer of this name was Lupicinus of Lyon, a saint from the 5th century AD.
MACRINA f Late Roman, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Feminine form of Macrinus. This name was borne by two saints, namely saint Macrina the Elder and her granddaughter saint Macrina the Younger.
MACRINUS m Late Roman, History
Roman cognomen, which because of the -inus suffix must be a diminutive, probably of what should be macrus. Macrus is either derived from Latin macer "thin, meagre", or a latinized form of Greek makros "large, long"... [more]
MAESA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Maesus. A bearer of this name was the Roman woman Julia Maesa, who was the maternal grandmother of Roman Emperors Elagabalus and Alexander Severus.
MAESIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile that was derived from Maesus. This was one of the names of Lollianus Mavortius, a Roman politician from the 4th century AD.
MAESUS m Late Roman
Roman praenomen, of which the meaning is uncertain. It is possibly related to (or even derived from) Latin maereo "to grieve, to mourn, to be sad" (also compare Latin maestus "sad, dejected, gloomy").
MAGNENTIUS m Late Roman
Probably derived from the Latin adjective magnus meaning "great, large" (also see Magnus). This name was borne by a Gallo-Roman usurper from the 4th century AD.
MAJORIANUS m Late Roman
Variant spelling of the Roman cognomen Maiorianus, which is ultimately derived from the Latin word maior meaning "greater, larger".
MAMERTUS m Late Roman
Saint Mamertus is a famous bearer. His brother was known as Claudianus Mamertus.
MANSUETUS m Late Roman
Means "tame" in Latin, from a contraction of the phrase manum suetus "tamed by the hand of another". It was borne by several early saints.
MARCELLIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Marcellus. This name was borne by two early saints.
MARCULUS m Late Roman
This given name is either a diminutive of Marcus (as it contains the Latin masculine diminutive suffix -ulus) or it is an independent name on its own, in which case it is derived from Latin marculus meaning "small hammer".... [more]
MARINIANA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Marinianus. A bearer of this name was Egnatia Mariniana, the mother of Roman Emperor Gallienus (3rd century AD).
MARINIANUS m Late Roman, History
Roman cognomen which was derived from Marinus. A bearer of this name was Publius Licinius Egnatius Marinianus, the youngest son of Roman Emperor Gallienus - both father and son died in 268 AD.
MARTIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Martinus (see Martin). This name was borne by Martianus Capella, who lived in the Late Antiquity.
MARTINIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen, which is an extended form of Martinus.
MAURICIUS m Late Roman
Variant form of Mauritius. This name was borne by a Byzantine Emperor from the 6th century AD.
MAURIKIOS m Late Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek, History
Hellenized form of Mauritius via Mauricius.
MAURILIUS m Late Roman
Probably diminutive of Maurus, though a Celtic root has been suggested: Mawrwr meaning "magnanimous", which coincides with a Welsh word meaning "great man" from mawr "great" (cognate of Gaelic mór "great") and gwr "man".
MAURINUS m Late Roman
Late Roman diminutive form of Maurus. This name was borne by an early medieval saint.
MAXIMINIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Maximinus.
MELANIUS m Late Roman
Latin and masculine form of Melanie.
MENECRATIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from the Greek personal name Menecrates. This cognomen is found in a 2nd century senatorial family (with the Lydian-born centurion P. Aelius Menecratianus at its head) that belongs to the Roman gens Aelia.
MESSIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Messius. This name was borne by a magister militum under the Western Roman emperor Avitus (5th century AD) and a priest who co-wrote a book about St. Caesarius of Arles (6th century AD).
MESSIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile that was derived from Messus. Known bearers of this name include Roman Emperor Decius (3rd century AD) and Roman politician Flavius Messius Phoebus Severus (5th century AD). Also, last but not least, note that while it is tempting to also assume that this name could have been a latinization of Hebrew messiah "anointed" (thus referring to Jesus), it is very unlikely... [more]
MESSUS m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin verb meto "to reap, to harvest, to cut, to sever", or from the latinized form of Greek mesos or messos "(the) middle, (the) middle one". A third possibility is that it is a variant form of Maesus.
MODERATA f Late Roman, Italian (Archaic)
Feminine form of Moderatus. Known bearers of this name include the 4th-century martyr and saint Moderata of Sirmium (which was located in what is nowadays Serbia) and the Venetian writer and poet Moderata Fonte (1555-1592), although it should be noted that in her case, the name is a pseudonym: her real name was Modesta di Pozzo di Forzi.
MODERATOS m Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Moderatus. This is the name by which the 1st-century Greek philosopher Moderatus of Gades was known in his native Greek.
MODERATUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin moderatus meaning "managed, controlled, moderate(d)". This name was borne by the 1st-century Roman writer Columella (whose full name was Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella) and by the 1st-century Greek philosopher Moderatus of Gades (which is nowadays Cádiz in southern Spain).
NEMESIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Nemesius. This name was borne by a Roman poet from the 3rd century AD.
NEPOTIANUS m Late Roman, History
This Roman cognomen is derived from the Roman nomen gentile Nepotius, which itself was derived from the Latin word nepos meaning "grandson, nephew, descendant". A bearer of this name was the 4th-century Roman usurper Nepotianus, a nephew of Constantine the Great (via Nepotianus' mother, Eutropia).
NIKOPOLITIANOS m Late Roman (Hellenized), Late Greek
Derived from Latin Nicopolitanus meaning "Nicopolitan, Nicopolite", as in: a citizen of Nicopolis. Also compare the Greek word πολίτης (polites) meaning "citizen, freeman".... [more]
NINFIDIA f Late Roman, Spanish
Italian and Spanish form of Nymphidia.
NONIA f Late Roman, History
Feminine form of Nonius. A bearer of this name was Nonia Celsa, the wife of Roman Emperor Macrinus as well as the mother of Roman Emperor Diadumenian.
NONIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen, which is an extended form of Nonius. A bearer of this name was Marcus Servilius Nonianus, a Roman historian from the 1st century AD.
NONIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile, which is derived from the Roman praenomen Nonus. Bearers of this name include Roman general and statesman Marcus Nonius Macrinus (2nd century AD) and his grandson, Roman senator Marcus Nonius Arrius Mucianus (3rd century AD).
NUMERIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Numerius.
NUMIDIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Numidius.
NUMIDIUS m Late Roman, Popular Culture
Of very uncertain and unclear origin and meaning. It may be a corruption of Ummidius in the first place.... [more]
NYMPHIDIANUS m Late Roman
Originally a Late Roman cognomen, which was derived from the latinized Greek name Nymphidius. In turn, the Greeks translated this cognomen back into Greek as Nymphidianos (Νυμφιδιανός)... [more]
ODERISIUS m Late Roman
Meaning uncertain. This was the name of a Benedictine abbot of Monte Cassino who is venerated as a saint; Abbot Oderisius I (not to be confused with his relative Abbot Oderisius II), born at Marsi, Italy, acted as mediator between the Crusaders and the Greek emperor Alexicus.
OPELLIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Opellius.
OPELLIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile which is of uncertain meaning. It might be derived from Latin opella, which is a diminutive of Latin opus "work, labour, accomplishment", and thus the word means something along the lines of "a bit of labour, a small job, a small accomplishment"... [more]
OPIMIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Opimius. This name has been borne by at least two Roman proconsuls from the 2nd century AD.
OPITRIA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Opiter.
OPSIUS m Late Roman
Roman nomen gentile which was most likely derived from the Latin noun ops which can mean "power, might, influence" as well as "aid, help, support" and "wealth, abundance, riches, resources." However, the nomen could also have come into existence for a different reason than for referring to the particular meaning that I just described... [more]
OPTATIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Optatus. A known bearer of this name was the 4th-century Latin poet Publilius Optatianus Porfirius.
OPTATUS m Late Roman, History
Roman cognomen which was derived from Latin optatus, which can mean "wished for, longed for, desired, pleasing" as well as "chosen, selected". It is ultimately derived from the Latin verb opto, which can mean "to wish for, to desire" as well as "to choose, to select"... [more]
ORBIANA f Late Roman, History
Feminine form of Orbianus. This name was borne by the wife of Roman emperor Alexander Severus.
ORBIANUS m Late Roman
Extended form of Orbius, which is derived from Latin orbis "circle, orb."
ORENTIUS m Late Roman
Variant form of Orientius.
ORIENTIUS m Late Roman
Derived from the Latin noun oriens, which can mean "east" as well as "daybreak, dawn, sunrise." The word is ultimately derived from the Latin verb orior meaning "to (a)rise, to get up"... [more]
OXYTHEUS m Late Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Greek Oxytheos, which was derived from Greek ὀξύς (oxus) or (oxys) "sharp, keen, pointed, acid(ic)" combined with Greek θεος (theos) "god". This is a very rare name (to us in modern times, at least) in that it has been found on only one inscription (dating from the 3rd century AD), which was dedicated to a Roman soldier named Titus Flavius Oxytheus... [more]
PACIFIC m Late Roman (Anglicized)
Anglicization of Pacificus, meaning 'Peacemaker.'
PACIFICUS m Late Roman, South African
Means "peacemaker" in Latin. From the Latin pāx 'peace' and faciō 'I do, make'.... [more]
PALLADIUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of the Greek name Παλλάδιος (Palladios) meaning "of Pallas" or "belonging to Pallas", Pallas being an epithet of the goddess Athena.
PASCHASIUS m Late Roman
Means "Easter" or "of Easter", derived from Latin Pascha "Easter", which itself was a latinization of Hebrew pesach "Passover". Also compare Latin Paschalis at Pascal.
PASIPHILUS m Ancient Greek (Latinized), Late Roman
Latinized form of Pasiphilos. A bearer of this name was Fabius Felix Pasiphilus Paulinus, a praefectus urbi from the 4th century AD.
PAULINIANUS m Late Roman
Roman cognomen which was derived from Paulinus. This name was borne by a Roman senator and consul from the 3rd century AD, as well by the younger brother of Saint Jerome (4th century AD).
PAULLA f Late Roman
Feminine form of Paullus.
PERFECTA f Late Roman, Spanish (Archaic)
Feminine form of Perfectus (late Roman) and Perfecto (Spanish).
PERFECTUS m Late Roman
Derived from Latin perfectus meaning "achieved, finished, completed" as well as "perfected".... [more]
PERPETUUS m Late Roman
Masculine form of Perpetua. The 6th-century saint Perpetuus was a bishop of Tours in France.
PHELIKITAS f Late Roman (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Felicitas (see Felicity).
PHILONELLA f Late Greek, Late Roman
Variant form of Philonilla, which is the name of a saint from the first century AD. The name Philonella is also used in reference to the saint (usually in sources that ultimately take their information from Latin texts rather than Greek texts), which has led people in at least the English-speaking world to use the two names interchangeably.