mangoem's Personal Name List

Aikaterine
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Αἰκατερίνη(Ancient Greek)
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Ancient Greek form of Katherine.
Aisling
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: ASH-lyən
Rating: 67% based on 3 votes
Means "dream" or "vision" in Irish. This name was created in the 20th century.
Alannah
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English (Modern)
Pronounced: ə-LAN-ə(English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Variant of Alana. It has been influenced by the affectionate Anglo-Irish word alannah, from the Irish Gaelic phrase a leanbh meaning "O child".
Alfie
Gender: Masculine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AL-fee
Rating: 47% based on 3 votes
Diminutive of Alfred.
Aliénor
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-LYEH-NAWR
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
French form of Eleanor.
Anaïs
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: A-NA-EES
Rating: 48% based on 4 votes
Possibly a French variant of Anahita. A famous bearer was the French writer Anaïs Nin (1903-1977), known for her diaries.
Annelies
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch
Pronounced: ah-nə-LEES
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Variant of Anneliese.
Annis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AN-is
Rating: 38% based on 4 votes
Medieval English form of Agnes.
Atalia
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: עֲתַלְיָה(Hebrew)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Modern Hebrew transcription of Athaliah.
Aubree
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AWB-ree
Rating: 17% based on 3 votes
Feminine variant of Aubrey.
Bailey
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: BAY-lee
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From an English surname derived from Middle English baili meaning "bailiff", originally denoting one who was a bailiff.

Already an uncommon masculine name, it slowly grew in popularity for American girls beginning in 1978 after the start of the sitcom WKRP in Cincinnati, which featured a character with this name. Though it remained more common as a feminine name, it got a boost for boys in 1994 from another television character on the drama Party of Five. In the United Kingdom and Australia it has always been more popular for boys.

Bet
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Frisian, Limburgish
Pronounced: BEHT(Limburgish)
Rating: 7% based on 3 votes
Frisian and Limburgish short form of Elisabeth.
Bran 1
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish [1]
Pronounced: BRAN(Irish)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran mac Febail was a mariner who was involved in several adventures on his quest to find the Otherworld.
Branimir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Croatian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Slovene
Other Scripts: Бранимир(Serbian, Bulgarian)
Rating: 37% based on 3 votes
Derived from the Slavic element borna "protection" combined with miru meaning "peace, world".
Branwen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wehn(Welsh)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "beautiful raven" from Old Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". According to the Second Branch of the Mabinogi [1] she was the daughter of Llŷr. After she was mistreated by her husband Matholwch, the king of Ireland, she managed to get a message to her brother Brân, the king of Britain. Brân launched a costly invasion to rescue her, but she died of grief shortly after her return.
Briony
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: BRIE-ə-nee
Rating: 43% based on 3 votes
Variant of Bryony.
Briseis
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Βρισηΐς(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: brie-SEE-is(English)
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Patronymic derived from Βρισεύς (Briseus), a Greek name of unknown meaning. In Greek mythology Briseis (real name Hippodameia) was the daughter of Briseus. She was captured during the Trojan War by Achilles. After Agamemnon took her away from him, Achilles refused to fight in the war.
Brynmor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Welsh
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
From the Welsh place name Brynmawr meaning "great hill".
Conor
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: KAHN-ər(English)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Conchobar (or the Modern Irish form Conchúr).
Elior
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: אֱלִיאוֹר(Hebrew)
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Means "my God is my light" in Hebrew.
Élodie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French
Pronounced: EH-LAW-DEE
Rating: 53% based on 3 votes
French form of Alodia.
Éowyn
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Literature
Pronounced: AY-ə-win(English)
Rating: 57% based on 3 votes
Means "horse joy" in Old English. This name was invented by J. R. R. Tolkien who used Old English to represent the Rohirric language. In his novel The Lord of the Rings (1954) Eowyn is the niece of King Theoden of Rohan. She slays the Lord of the Nazgul in the Battle of the Pelennor Fields.
Eran
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: עֵירָן(Ancient Hebrew)
Rating: 23% based on 3 votes
Means "watchful, vigilant" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament he is a grandson of Ephraim.
Felix
Gender: Masculine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Romanian, Ancient Roman, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Pronounced: FEH-liks(German, Swedish) FAY-liks(Dutch) FEE-liks(English) FEH-leeks(Latin)
Rating: 50% based on 4 votes
From a Roman cognomen meaning "lucky, successful" in Latin. It was acquired as an agnomen, or nickname, by the 1st-century BC Roman general Sulla. It also appears in the New Testament belonging to the governor of Judea who imprisoned Saint Paul.

Due to its favourable meaning, this name was popular among early Christians, being borne by many early saints and four popes. It has been used in England since the Middle Ages, though it has been more popular in continental Europe. A notable bearer was the German composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847).

Fiera
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Esperanto
Pronounced: fee-EH-ra
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Means "proud" in Esperanto.
Finley
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: FIN-lee
Rating: 20% based on 3 votes
Variant of Finlay. This is by far the preferred spelling in the United States, where it has lately been more common as a feminine name.
Hecate
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ἑκάτη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHK-ə-tee(English)
Rating: 13% based on 3 votes
From the Greek Ἑκάτη (Hekate), possibly derived from ἑκάς (hekas) meaning "far off". In Greek mythology Hecate was a goddess associated with witchcraft, crossroads, tombs, demons and the underworld.
Hene
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: הענע(Yiddish)
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Yiddish variant of Hannah.
Ian
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: EE-ən(English)
Rating: 40% based on 3 votes
Anglicized form of Scottish Gaelic Iain, itself from Latin Iohannes (see John). It became popular in the United Kingdom outside of Scotland in the first half of the 20th century, but did not begin catching on in America until the 1960s.
Inácio
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Portuguese
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
Portuguese form of Ignatius.
Jacinthe
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Rare)
Pronounced: ZHA-SEHNT
Rating: 30% based on 3 votes
French cognate of Hyacinth 2.
Jitka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Pronounced: YIT-ka
Rating: 10% based on 3 votes
Old Czech variant of Judith. This name was borne by an 11th-century duchess of Bohemia, a German noblewoman who was abducted by her husband Duke Bretislav.
Kattalin
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: ka-KYA-leen
Rating: 25% based on 4 votes
Basque form of Katherine.
Keely
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KEE-lee
Rating: 48% based on 5 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Caolaidhe, itself derived from the given name Caoladhe, from Irish caol "slender".
Ketevan
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ქეთევან(Georgian)
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Georgian form of Katayoun. It is sometimes used as a Georgian form of Katherine.
Kielo
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Finnish
Pronounced: KEE-lo
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Means "lily of the valley" in Finnish.
Klaudie
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Czech feminine form of Claudius.
Kotryna
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Lithuanian
Rating: 15% based on 2 votes
Lithuanian form of Katherine.
Kveta
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovak
Pronounced: KVEH-ta
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Slovak form of Květa.
Lenka
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Czech, Slovak
Pronounced: LENG-ka
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Originally a diminutive of Magdaléna or Helena. It is now used as an independent name.
Liat
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאַת(Hebrew)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Means "you are mine" in Hebrew.
Lior
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: לִיאוֹר(Hebrew)
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Means "light for me" in Hebrew.
Lorcán
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: LOR-kawn
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "little fierce one", derived from Old Irish lorcc "fierce" combined with a diminutive suffix. Saint Lorcán was a 12th-century archbishop of Dublin.
Lugh
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Probably an Irish form of Lugus. In Irish mythology Lugh Lámfada was a divine hero who led the Tuatha Dé Danann against his grandfather Balor and the Fomorians. Lugh killed Balor by shooting a stone into his giant eye.
Lyra
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Astronomy
Pronounced: LIE-rə(English)
Rating: 65% based on 2 votes
The name of the constellation in the northern sky containing the star Vega. It is said to be shaped after the lyre of Orpheus.
Magda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Hungarian, Croatian, Slovene, Romanian, Portuguese, Greek
Other Scripts: Μάγδα(Greek)
Pronounced: MAK-da(German) MAHKH-dah(Dutch) MAG-da(Czech, Slovak, Polish) MAWG-daw(Hungarian)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Short form of Magdalena.
Maialen
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Pronounced: MIE-a-lehn
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Basque form of Magdalene.
Majda
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Slovene, Croatian
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Short form of Magdalena.
Meave
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Rating: 35% based on 2 votes
Variant of Maeve.
Meir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: מֵאִיר(Hebrew)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Means "giving light" in Hebrew.
Moana
Gender: Feminine & Masculine
Usage: Maori, Hawaiian, Tahitian, Samoan, Tongan
Pronounced: mo-A-na(Hawaiian)
Rating: 10% based on 2 votes
Means "ocean, wide expanse of water, deep sea" in Maori, Hawaiian and other Polynesian languages.
Ness 1
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish Mythology
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Old Irish form of Neasa.
Noemí
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: no-eh-MEE
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Spanish form of Naomi 1.
Reilly
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: RIE-lee
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
From an Irish surname, an Anglicized form of Ó Raghailligh, derived from the given name Raghailleach, meaning unknown.
Rio 1
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Various
Rating: 25% based on 2 votes
Means "river" in Spanish or Portuguese. A city in Brazil bears this name. Its full name is Rio de Janeiro, which means "river of January", so named because the first explorers came to the harbour in January and mistakenly thought it was a river mouth.
Roe
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: RO
Rating: 33% based on 3 votes
Transferred use of the surname Roe.
Rory
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Irish, Scottish, English
Pronounced: RAWR-ee(English)
Rating: 45% based on 2 votes
Anglicized form of Ruaidhrí. Typically a masculine name, it gained some popularity for girls in the United States after it was used on the television series Gilmore Girls (2000-2007), in this case as a nickname for Lorelai. Despite this, the name has grown more common for boys in America, especially after 2011, perhaps due to Northern Irish golfer Rory McIlroy (1989-).
Séamus
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: SHEH-məs
Rating: 40% based on 2 votes
Irish form of James.
Seraphina
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), German (Rare), Late Roman
Pronounced: sehr-ə-FEEN-ə(English) zeh-ra-FEE-na(German)
Rating: 30% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones". The seraphim were an order of angels, described by Isaiah in the Bible as having six wings each.

This was the name of a 13th-century Italian saint who made clothes for the poor. As an English name, it has never been common.

Shaindel
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Yiddish (Rare)
Other Scripts: שיינדל(Yiddish)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Diminutive of Shayna.
Shiri
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: שׁירי(Hebrew)
Rating: 20% based on 2 votes
Means "my song" in Hebrew.
Sigalit
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: סִיגָלִית(Hebrew)
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Variant of Sigal.
Sigrid
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, German, Estonian, Finnish (Archaic)
Pronounced: SEE-grid(Swedish) SEEG-reed(Finnish)
Rating: 63% based on 3 votes
From the Old Norse name Sigríðr, which was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and fríðr "beautiful, fair".
Tal
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: TAL
Rating: 0% based on 2 votes
Derived from Hebrew טַל (tal) meaning "dew".
Yaromir
Gender: Masculine
Usage: Medieval Slavic [1]
Other Scripts: Яромир(Church Slavic)
Rating: 50% based on 2 votes
Medieval Slavic form of Jaromír.
Zorione
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Rating: 5% based on 2 votes
Feminine form of Zorion.
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