Previous Names of the Day

AMERIGO   m   Italian Jul 4th
Medieval Italian form of EMMERICH. Amerigo Vespucci (1451-1512) was the Italian explorer who gave the continent of America its name (from Americus, the Latin form of his name).

ULRICH   m   German, French, Ancient Germanic Jul 3rd
From the Germanic name Odalric meaning "prosperity and power", from the element odal "heritage" combined with ric "power". It has long been confused with the Germanic name Hulderic. This was the name of two German saints.

ÆÐELRÆD   m   Anglo-Saxon Jul 2nd
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel". This was the name of two Saxon kings of England including Æðelræd II "the Unready" whose realm was overrun by the Danes in the early 11th century. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest.

VIRGINIA   f   English, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Swedish, Romanian, Ancient Roman Jul 1st
Feminine form of the Roman family name Verginius or Virginius which is of unknown meaning, but long associated with Latin virgo "maid, virgin". According to a legend, it was the name of a Roman woman killed by her father so as to save her from the clutches of a crooked official.

JOHN   m   English, Biblical Jun 30th
English form of Iohannes, the Latin form of the Greek name Ιωαννης (Ioannes), itself derived from the Hebrew name יוֹחָנָן (Yochanan) meaning "YAHWEH is gracious". This name owes its popularity to two New Testament characters, both highly revered saints.

CONFUCIUS   m   History Jun 29th
Anglicized form of the Chinese name Kong Fu Zi. The surname Kong means "hole, opening", the generation name Fu means "man, husband", and the given name Zi means "son". This was the name of a 6th-century BC Chinese philosopher.

ANNA   f   English, Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Estonian, Latvian, Greek, Hungarian, Polish, Russian, Ukrainian, Belarusian, Czech, Slovak, Bulgarian, Icelandic, Catalan, Occitan, Breton, Biblical, Old Church Slavic, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek Jun 28th
Form of Channah (see HANNAH) used in the Greek and Latin Old Testament. Many later Old Testament translations, including the English, use the Hannah spelling instead of Anna. The name appears briefly in the New Testament belonging to a prophetess who recognized Jesus as the Messiah.