Previous Names of the Day

BLANDINE   f   French Feb 12th
French form of the Roman name Blandina, which was the feminine form of Blandinus, which was itself a derivative of the cognomen BLANDUS. Saint Blandina was a 2nd-century slave who was martyred in Lyons.

INDIRA   f   Indian, Hinduism Feb 11th
Means "beauty" in Sanskrit. This is another name of Lakshmi, the wife of the Hindu god Vishnu. A notable bearer was India's first female prime minister, Indira Gandhi (1917-1984).

FREDERICK   m   English Feb 10th
English form of a Germanic name meaning "peaceful ruler", derived from frid "peace" and ric "ruler, power". This name has long been common in continental Germanic-speaking regions, being borne by rulers of the Holy Roman Empire, Germany, Austria, Scandinavia, and Prussia.

PHOEBE   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin Feb 9th
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis.

LUCIANUS   m   Ancient Roman Feb 8th
Roman family name which was derived from the Roman praenomen LUCIUS. Lucianus (or Λουκιανος in his native Greek) of Samosata was a 2nd-century satirist and author.

BEOWULF   m   Anglo-Saxon Mythology Feb 7th
Possibly means "bee wolf" (in effect equal to "bear") from Old English beo "bee" and wulf "wolf". This is the name of the main character in the anonymous 8th-century epic poem 'Beowulf'. The poem tells how Beowulf slays the monster Grendel and its mother, but goes on to tell how he is killed in his old age fighting a dragon.

JULIA   f   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Spanish, Polish, Finnish, Ancient Roman, Biblical Feb 6th
Feminine form of JULIUS. A person by this name has a brief mention in the New Testament. It was borne by a few early saints and martyrs, including the patron saint of Corsica. Shakespeare used the name in his comedy 'The Two Gentlemen of Verona' (1594).