Previous Names of the Day

ARASH   m   Iranian, Persian Mythology Apr 20th
Possibly means either "truthfulness" or "bright" in Persian. In Persian legend Arash was a Persian archer who was ordered by the Turans to shoot an arrow, the landing place of which would determine the new location of the Persian-Turan border.

SPARTACUS   m   History Apr 19th
Means "from the city of Sparta" in Latin. Spartacus was the name of a Thracian-born Roman slave who led a slave revolt in Italy in the 1st century BC. He was eventually killed in battle and many of his followers were crucified.

NOAH (1)   m   English, Biblical Apr 18th
Derived from the Hebrew name נוֹחַ (Noach) meaning "rest, comfort". According to the Old Testament, Noah was the builder of the Ark that allowed him, his family, and animals of each species to survive the great Flood. After the Flood he received the sign of the rainbow as a covenant from God.

GERTRUDE   f   English, German, Dutch Apr 17th
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and þruþ "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century.

AMATERASU   f   Far Eastern Mythology Apr 16th
Means "shining over heaven", from Japanese 天 (ama) "heaven, sky" and 照 (terasu) "shine". This was the name of the Japanese sun goddess, the ruler of the heavens. At one time the Japanese royal family claimed descent from her.

MARLENE   f   German, English Apr 15th
Blend of MARIA and MAGDALENE. It refers, therefore, to Mary Magdalene, a character in the New Testament. The name was popularized by the German actress and singer Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), whose real name was Maria Magdalene von Losch.

UMAR   m   Arabic Apr 14th
Means "populous, flourishing", derived from Arabic عمر ('umr) "life". Umar was a companion and strong supporter of Muhammad who became the second caliph of the Muslims. He is considered to be one of the great founders of the Muslim state. The name was also borne by a 12th-century poet from Persia, Umar Khayyam.