Previous Names of the Day

MACKENZIE   f & m   English Oct 24th
From the Gaelic surname Mac Coinnich, which means "son of COINNEACH". A famous bearer of the surname was William Lyon MacKenzie (1795-1861), a Canadian journalist and political rebel. As a feminine given name, it was popularized by the American actress Mackenzie Phillips (1959-).

HATSHEPSUT   f   Ancient Egyptian Oct 23rd
Means "foremost of noble women" in Egyptian. This was the name of a pharaoh of the 18th dynasty. She may have been the first woman to take the title of Pharaoh.

JACOB   m   English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Jewish, Biblical Oct 22nd
From the Latin Iacobus, which was from the Greek Ιακωβος (Iakobos), which was from the Hebrew name יַעֲקֹב (Ya'aqov). In the Old Testament Jacob (later called Israel) is the son of Isaac and Rebecca and the father of the twelve founders of the twelve tribes of Israel.

MACARIO   m   Spanish Oct 21st
Spanish form of the Latin name Macarius, derived from the Greek name Μακαριος (Makarios), which was in turn derived from Greek μακαρ (makar) meaning "blessed, happy". This was the name of several early saints.

ISIDORE   m   English, French, Georgian, Jewish Oct 20th
From the Greek name Ισιδωρος (Isidoros) which meant "gift of Isis", derived from the name of the Egyptian goddess ISIS combined with Greek δωρον (doron) "gift". Saint Isidore of Seville was a 6th-century archbishop, historian and theologian.

HANNAH   f   English, Hebrew, French, German, Dutch, Swedish, Biblical Oct 19th
From the Hebrew name חַנָּה (Channah) meaning "favour" or "grace". In the Old Testament this is the name of the wife of Elkanah. Her rival was Elkanah's other wife Peninnah, who had children while Hannah remained barren. After a blessing from Eli she finally became pregnant with Samuel.

ROBERT   m   English, French, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Polish, Russian, Slovene, Croatian, Romanian, Ancient Germanic Oct 18th
From the Germanic name Hrodebert meaning "bright fame", derived from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and beraht "bright". The Normans introduced this name to Britain, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hreodbeorht. It has been a very common English name since that time.