Previous Names of the Day

ABRAHAM   m   English, Hebrew, Spanish, French, Dutch, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Biblical, Biblical Latin Aug 14th
This name may be viewed either as meaning "father of many" in Hebrew or else as a contraction of ABRAM (1) and הָמוֹן (hamon) meaning "many, multitude". The biblical patriarch Abraham was originally named Abram but God changed his name (see Genesis 17:5).

SALOME   f   English, German, Georgian, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Biblical Greek Aug 13th
From an Aramaic name which was related to the Hebrew word שָׁלוֹם (shalom) meaning "peace". According to the historian Josephus this was the name of the daughter of Herodias (the consort of Herod Antipas, the tetrarch of Galilee).

SARASWATI   f   Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi Aug 12th
Means "possessing water" from Sanskrit सरस् (saras) meaning "fluid, water, lake" and वती (vati) meaning "having". This is the name of a Hindu river goddess, also associated with learning and the arts, who is the wife of Brahma.

NIKEPHOROS   m & f   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology Aug 11th
Means "carrying victory" from Greek νικη (nike) "victory" and φερω (phero) "to carry, to bear". This name was borne by several Byzantine emperors, including the 10th-century Nikephoros II Phokas. Besides being a masculine personal name, it was also a title borne by the goddess Athena.

MARIE   f & m   French, Czech, German, English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish Aug 10th
French and Czech form of MARIA. A notable bearer of this name was Marie Antoinette, a queen of France who was executed by guillotine during the French Revolution. Another was Marie Curie (1867-1934), a physicist and chemist who studied radioactivity with her husband Pierre.

WALBURGA   f   German Aug 9th
Means "ruler of the fortress" from the Germanic elements wald "power, leader, ruler" and burg "fortress". This was the name of an 8th-century saint from England who did missionary work in Germany.

WALTER   m   English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Polish, Italian, Ancient Germanic Aug 8th
From a Germanic name meaning "ruler of the army", composed of the elements wald "rule" and hari "army". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Wealdhere. A famous bearer of the name was Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832), a Scottish novelist who wrote 'Ivanhoe' and other notable works.