Names Categorized "legendary creatures"

This is a list of names in which the categories include legendary creatures.
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BURAK m Turkish
From Arabic براق (Buraq), the name of the legendary creature that, according to Islamic tradition, transported the Prophet Muhammad. Its name is derived from Arabic برق (barq) meaning "lightning".
CERBERUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek Κερβερος (Kerberos), which possibly meant "spotted". In Greek myth this was the name of the three-headed dog that guarded the entrance to Hades.
DRAKE m English
From an English surname derived from the Old Norse byname Draki or the Old English byname Draca both meaning "dragon", both via Latin from Greek δρακων (drakon) meaning "dragon, serpent". This name coincides with the unrelated English word drake meaning "male duck".
GRIFFIN m English
Latinized form of GRUFFUDD. This name can also be inspired by the English word griffin, a creature with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle, ultimately from Greek γρυψ (gryps).
HUANG m & f Chinese
From Chinese (huáng) meaning "bright, shining, luminous" (which is usually only masculine) or (huáng) meaning "phoenix" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
LAMIA (2) f Greek Mythology
Possibly from Greek λαιμος (laimos) meaning "throat". In Greek mythology this is the name of a queen of Libya who was a mistress of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, kills Lamia's children, causing her to go mad and transform into a monster that hunts the children of others.
LOAN (2) f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (loan), which refers to a mythological bird.
MEDUSA f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Μεδουσα (Medousa), which was derived from μεδω (medo) meaning "to protect, to rule over". In Greek myth this was the name of one of the three Gorgons, ugly women who had snakes for hair. She was so hideous that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone, so the hero Perseus had to look using the reflection in his shield in order to slay her.
PEGASUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Πηγασος (Pegasos), possibly either from πηγος (pegos) meaning "strong" or πηγαιος (pegaios) meaning "from a water spring". In Greek mythology Pegasus was the winged horse that sprang from the blood of Medusa after she was killed by Perseus. There is a constellation in the northern sky named after the horse.
PHOENIX m & f English (Modern)
From the name of a beautiful immortal bird that appears in Egyptian and Greek mythology. After living for several centuries in the Arabian Desert, it would be consumed by fire and rise from its own ashes, with this cycle repeating every 500 years. The name of the bird was derived from Greek φοινιξ (phoinix) meaning "dark red".
PHƯỢNG f Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (phượng) meaning "phoenix". This refers to the mythological creature known as the Chinese phoenix or the Fenghuang.
QUETZALCOATL m Aztec and Toltec Mythology
Means "feathered snake" in Nahuatl, derived from quetzalli "feather" and coatl "snake". In Aztec and other Mesoamerican mythology he was the god of the sky, wind, and knowledge, also associated with the morning star. According to one legend he created the humans of this age using the bones of humans from the previous age and adding his own blood.
TIAMAT f Semitic Mythology
From Akkadian tâmtu meaning "sea". In Babylonian myth Tiamat was the personification of the sea, appearing in the form of a huge dragon. By Apsu she gave birth to the first of the gods. Later, the god Marduk (her great-grandson) defeated her, cut her in half, and used the pieces of her body to make the earth and the sky.
UNDINE f Literature
Derived from Latin unda meaning "wave". The word undine was created by the medieval author Paracelsus, who used it for female water spirits.