Names Categorized "weapons"

This is a list of names in which the categories include weapons.
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AGE (1)   m   Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element agil meaning "edge (of a sword), blade".
AGHI   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of OVE.
AGI   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ag meaning "edge of a sword".
AGILULF   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge (of a sword), blade" and wulf "wolf". This name was borne by a 6th-century king of the Lombards and by an 8th-century bishop of Cologne and saint.
AGNAR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
From the Old Norse name Agnarr, derived from agi "awe, terror" or ag "edge of a sword" combined with arr "warrior".
AIKE   m   Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element agil meaning "edge (of a sword), blade".
ALDEBRAND   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements ald meaning "old" and brand meaning "sword" or "fire". Saint Aldebrand was a 12th-century bishop of Fossombrone in Italy.
ALIPRAND   m   Ancient Germanic
From the Germanic elements alja meaning "other, foreign" and brand meaning "sword" or "fire".
AMUND   m   Norwegian
Derived from the Old Norse name Agmundr, from the element ag "edge of a sword" or agi "awe, terror" combined with mundr "protection".
ANSGAR   m   German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ans "god" and ger "spear". Saint Ansgar was a 9th-century missionary who tried to convert the Danes and Norwegians.
ASGER   m   Danish
From the Old Norse name Ásgeirr, derived from the elements áss meaning "god" and geirr meaning "spear".
BERENGAR   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements bern "bear" and ger "spear". This was the name of two medieval kings of Italy and a Holy Roman Emperor.
BERENGARIA   f   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized feminine form of BERENGAR. This name was borne by a 13th-century queen of Castile.
BOTOND   m   Hungarian
Means "stick, mace" in Hungarian.
BRANDO   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the element brand meaning "sword".
BRANDR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse byname meaning "sword" or "fire".
BRENDA   f   English
Possibly a feminine form of the Old Norse name Brandr, meaning "sword", which was brought to Britain in the Middle Ages. This name is sometimes used as a feminine form of BRENDAN.
EDGAR   m   English, French
Derived from the Old English elements ead "wealth, fortune" and gar "spear". This was the name of a 10th-century English king, Edgar the Peaceful. The name did not survive long after the Norman conquest, but it was revived in the 18th century, in part due to a character by this name in Sir Walter Scott's novel 'The Bride of Lammermoor' (1819), which tells of the tragic love between Edgar Ravenswood and Lucy Ashton. Famous bearers include author and poet Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849), French impressionist painter Edgar Degas (1834-1917), and author Edgar Rice Burroughs (1875-1950).
EGBERT   m   English, Dutch
Means "bright edge" from the Old English elements ecg "edge of a sword" and beorht "bright". This was the name of kings of Kent and Wessex as well as two English saints. The name was rarely used after the Norman conquest but was revived in the 19th century.
EGILHARD   m   Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements agil "edge of a sword" and hard "brave, hardy".
EGON   m   German
Derived from the Germanic element ag, which means "edge of a sword".
FERRUCCIO   m   Italian
Derived from the Late Latin name Ferrutius, a derivative of ferrum meaning "iron, sword". Saint Ferrutius was a 3rd-century martyr with his brother Ferreolus.
FLETCHER   m   English
From a surname meaning "maker of arrows" in Middle English, ultimately from Old French flechier.
GARRETT   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from the given name GERALD or GERARD. A famous bearer of the surname was Pat Garrett (1850-1908), the sheriff who shot Billy the Kid.
GARY   m   English
From an English surname which was derived from a Norman given name, which was itself originally a short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear". This name was popularized in the late 1920s the American actor Gary Cooper (1901-1961), who took his stage name from the city of Gary in Indiana where his agent was born.
GEIR   m   Norwegian, Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse element geirr meaning "spear".
GERALD   m   English, German
From a Germanic name meaning "rule of the spear", from the elements ger "spear" and wald "rule". The Normans brought this name to Britain. Though it died out in England during the Middle Ages, it remained common in Ireland. It was revived in the English-speaking world in 19th century.
GERARD   m   English, Dutch, Catalan, Polish
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with hard "brave, hardy". The Normans introduced this name to Britain. It was initially much more common than the similar name Gerald, with which it was often confused, but it is now less common.
GERBEN   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and bern "bear".
GERFRIED   m   German (Rare)
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and frid "peace".
GERHILD   f   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hild "battle".
GERLACH   m   Dutch, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with laic "play". Saint Gerlach was a 12th-century Dutch soldier who became a hermit.
GERLINDE   f   German, Dutch
Derived from the Germanic element ger "spear" combined with linde "soft, tender".
GERNOT   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and hnod "crush".
GERO   m   German, Ancient Germanic
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element ger meaning "spear".
GERTRUDE   f   English, Dutch
Means "spear of strength", derived from the Germanic elements ger "spear" and thrud "strength". Saint Gertrude the Great was a 13th-century nun and mystic writer. It was probably introduced to England by settlers from the Low Countries in the 15th century. Shakespeare used the name in his play 'Hamlet' (1600) for the mother of the title character. A famous bearer was the American writer Gertrude Stein (1874-1946).
GERULF   m   German (Rare), Ancient Germanic
Derived from Germanic ger "spear" and wulf "wolf".
GERVASIUS   m   Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Probably a Latinized form of a Germanic name with a first element deriving from ger "spear". Saint Gervasius was an early martyr from Milan whose remains were discovered in the 4th century.
GUDBRAND   m   Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Guðbrandr meaning "god's sword", derived from the elements guð "god" and brandr "sword".
HILDEBRAND   m   German (Archaic), Ancient Germanic
Means "battle sword", derived from the Germanic element hild "battle" combined with brand "sword". This was the name of the hero of an 8th-century poem written in Old High German.
HJÖRDÍS   f   Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Means "sword goddess", derived from Old Norse hjörr "sword" and dís "goddess".
HOLGER   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Hólmgeirr, derived from the elements hólmr "island" and geirr "spear". This was the name of one of Charlemagne's generals, a nobleman from Denmark.
HRÓARR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name, derived from the element hróðr "fame" combined with either geirr "spear" (making it a relation of HRÓÐGEIRR), arr "warrior" or varr "vigilant, cautious". This is the name of a legendary Danish king, the same one who is featured in the Anglo-Saxon poem 'Beowulf' with the name Hroðgar.
HROÐGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Old English cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER). The name became unused after the Normans introduced Hrodger after their invasion. In the Old English poem 'Beowulf' this is the name of the Danish king.
HRÓÐGEIRR   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse cognate of Hrodger (see ROGER).
HUSAM   m   Arabic
Means "sword" in Arabic, a derivative of the verb حسم (hasama) meaning "to sever, to finish, to decide".
IJSBRAND   m   Dutch
Derived from the Germanic elements is "ice, iron" and brand "sword".
JÖRDIS   f   German
German form of HJÖRDÍS.
KUNTI   f   Hinduism
Means "spear" in Sanskrit. In the Hindu epic the 'Mahabharata' this is the name of the mother of the Pandavas.
LANCE   m   English
From the Germanic name Lanzo, originally a short form of names that began with the element land meaning "land". During the Middle Ages it became associated with Old French lance "spear, lance". A famous bearer is American cyclist Lance Armstrong (1971-).
LUDGER   m   German, Dutch
From the Germanic name Leudagar which was derived from the elements leud "people" and ger "spear". Saint Ludger was an 8th-century Frisian Benedictine bishop who founded a monastery at Munster.
MIECZYSŁAW   m   Polish
Derived from the Slavic element mechi "sword" combined with slava "glory".
ODD   m   Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse oddr meaning "point of a sword".
ODDMUND   m   Norwegian
Possibly a modern coinage based on the Old Norse elements oddr "point of a sword" and mundr "protection".
OLEGARIO   m   Spanish
Spanish form of a Germanic name, possibly Aldegar, derived from the elements ald "old" and ger "spear". This was the name of a 12th-century saint, a bishop of Barcelona.
ORVAR   m   Swedish, Norse Mythology
Means "arrow" in Old Norse. Orvar Odd is a legendary Norse hero who is the subject of a 13th-century Icelandic saga.
OSGAR   m   Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements os "god" and gar "spear".
OVE   m   Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Probably a modern form of the Old Danish name Aghi, originally a short form of names that contain the Old Norse element ag "edge of a sword" or agi "terror".
PEREDUR   m   Welsh Mythology, Arthurian Romance
Possibly means "hard spears" in Welsh. This was the name of several figures from Welsh mythology. It was later used by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Arthurian tales. The character of Percival was probably based on him.
REMBRANDT   m   Dutch
From a Germanic name which was composed of the elements ragin "advice" and brand "sword". This name belonged to the 17th-century Dutch painter Rembrandt van Rijn.
RHONDA   f   English
Probably intended to mean "good spear" from Welsh rhon "spear" and da "good", but possibly influenced by the name of the Rhondda Valley in South Wales, which means "noisy". It has been in use only since the 20th century. Its use may have been partially inspired by Margaret Mackworth, Viscountess Rhondda (1883-1956), a British feminist.
RHONWEN   f   Welsh
Means either "fair spear" or "fair hair" in Welsh. The first element is either rhon "spear" or rhawn "(coarse) hair", and the second element is gwen "fair, white, blessed".
ROGER   m   English, French, Catalan, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch
Means "famous spear" from the Germanic elements hrod "fame" and ger "spear". The Normans brought this name to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Hroðgar (the name of the Danish king in the Anglo-Saxon epic 'Beowulf'). It was a common name in England during the Middle Ages. By the 18th century it was rare, but it was revived in following years. The name was borne by the Norman lords Roger I, who conquered Sicily in the 11th century, and his son Roger II, who ruled Sicily as a king.
SAIF   m   Arabic
Means "sword" in Arabic.
SAIF AL-DIN   m   Arabic
Means "sword of the faith" from Arabic سيف (sayf) "sword" and دين (din) "religion, faith".
SAIFUL   m   Arabic
First part of compound Arabic names beginning with سيف ال (Sayf al) meaning "sword of the" (such as SAIF AL-DIN).
SAIFULLAH   m   Arabic
Means "sword of God" from Arabic سيف (sayf) "sword" combined with الله (Allah) "God".
SALIL   m   Arabic
Means "sword" or "son" in Arabic.
SASKIA   f   Dutch, German
From the Germanic element Sahs "Saxon". The Saxons were a Germanic tribe, their name ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife".
SAXON   m   English (Rare)
From a surname which was derived from the name of the Germanic tribe the Saxons, ultimately deriving from the Germanic word sahs meaning "knife". This name can also be given in direct reference to the tribe.
SEFU   m   Eastern African, Swahili
Means "sword" in Swahili, ultimately from Arabic سيف (sayf).
SHAMGAR   m   Biblical
Possibly means "sword" in Hebrew. Shamgar was one of the Old Testament judges.
ÞÓRGÍSL   m   Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse name meaning "Thor's shaft" from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with gísl "shaft, arrow".
WIGBRAND   m   Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements wig "war" and brand "sword".
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