Browse Names

This is a list of names in which the meaning contains the keywords bird or eagle or hawk or condor or owl or raven or crow or sparrow or wren.
gender
usage
meaning
Aderyn f Welsh (Rare)
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
Aenoheso m Indigenous American, Cheyenne
Means "little hawk", from Cheyenne aénohe "hawk" and the diminutive suffix -so.
Aetius m Ancient Roman
Roman cognomen that was probably derived from Greek ἀετός (aetos) meaning "eagle". A famous bearer was the 5th-century Roman general Flavius Aetius, who defeated Attila the Hun at the Battle of Chalons.
Andor 1 m Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnþórr, derived from the element arn "eagle" combined with the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor).
Ane 2 m Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
Anker m Danish
From the Old Danish name Ankarl, of uncertain meaning, possibly a combination of Old Norse arn "eagle" and karl "man".
Anne 2 m Frisian
Short form of names beginning with the Germanic element arn "eagle".
Antiman m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "condor of the sun" in Mapuche, from antü "sun" and mañku "condor".
Antinanco m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "eagle of the sun" in Mapuche, from antü "sun" and ñamko "eagle, hawk, buzzard".
Aquila m & f Biblical, Ancient Roman
From a Roman cognomen meaning "eagle" in Latin. In Acts in the New Testament Paul lives with Aquila and his wife Priscilla (or Prisca) for a time.
Aras m Lithuanian
Means "eagle" in Lithuanian (a poetic word).
Arend m Dutch, German (Rare)
Dutch and German variant of Arnold. This is also the Dutch word for "eagle".
Ari 2 m Old Norse, Icelandic, Finnish
Old Norse byname meaning "eagle".
Arke m Frisian
Originally a short form of Germanic names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
Arnar m Icelandic
Derived from the Old Norse elements arn "eagle" and herr "army" or arr "warrior".
Arnbjǫrg f Old Norse
Old Norse name derived from the elements arn meaning "eagle" and bjǫrg meaning "help, save, rescue".
Arne 1 m Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Originally an Old Norse short form of names beginning with the element arn meaning "eagle".
Arnfinn m Norwegian
Norwegian form of Arnfinnr, which was derived from the elements arn "eagle" and finnr "Sámi, person from Finland".
Arnfried m German (Rare)
From a Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and frid "peace".
Arnold m English, German, Dutch, Polish, Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic name meaning "eagle power", derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wald "power". The Normans brought it to England, where it replaced the Old English cognate Earnweald. It died out as an English name after the Middle Ages, but it was revived in the 19th century.... [more]
Arnulf m German, Ancient Germanic
Germanic name derived from the elements arn "eagle" and wulf "wolf".
Arūnas m Lithuanian
Derived from poetic Lithuanian aras meaning "eagle" combined with the patronymic suffix ūnas.
Arvid m Swedish, Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Arnviðr, derived from the elements arn "eagle" and viðr "tree".
Astor m English (Rare)
From a German and French surname derived from Occitan astur meaning "hawk". The wealthy and influential Astor family, prominent in British and American society, originated in the Italian Alps.
Asuka f & m Japanese
From Japanese 明日 (asu) meaning "tomorrow" and (ka) meaning "fragrance", or from (asu) meaning "to fly" and (ka) meaning "bird". Other kanji combinations can be possible as well.
Aucaman m Indigenous American, Mapuche
Means "wild condor" in Mapuche, from awka- "wild" and mañke "condor".
Avis f English
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
Awilix f Mayan Mythology
Meaning uncertain, possibly from a place name Awilizapan, or possibly from a Q'eqchi' Maya word meaning "swallow (bird)". This was the name of the K'iche' Maya goddess of the moon, night and death.
Bertram m English, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "bright raven", derived from the Germanic element beraht "bright" combined with hramn "raven". The Normans introduced this name to England. Shakespeare used it in his play All's Well That Ends Well (1603).
Birdie f English
Diminutive of Bertha, Bernice and other names with a similar sound, or sometimes simply from the English word bird.
Brân m Welsh Mythology
Means "raven" in Welsh. According to the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, Brân the Blessed (called Bendigeidfran) was a giant king of Britain. He was the son of the divine figure Llŷr. After his sister Branwen was mistreated by her husband the Irish king Matholwch, Brân led an attack on Ireland (the text says that he was so big he was able to wade there). Although victorious, the British lost all except seven men with Brân being mortally wounded by a poisoned spear. He asked the survivors to cut of his head and return with it to Britain. The head continued to speak for many years until it was buried in London.
Bran 1 m Irish, Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Means "raven" in Irish. In Irish legend Bran mac Febail was a mariner who was involved in several adventures on his quest to find the Otherworld.
Branwen f Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Means "beautiful raven" from Old Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". According to the Second Branch of the Mabinogi she was the daughter of Llŷr. After she was mistreated by her husband Matholwch, the king of Ireland, she managed to get a message to her brother Brân, the king of Britain. Brân launched a costly invasion to rescue her, but she died of grief shortly after her return.
Brennus m Gaulish (Latinized)
Latinized form of a Celtic name (or title) that possibly meant either "king, prince" or "raven". Brennus was a Gallic leader of the 4th century BC who attacked and sacked Rome.
Cauã m Indigenous American, Tupi
From Tupi kaûã meaning "hawk, falcon".
Celandine f English (Rare)
From the name of the flower, which is derived from Greek χελιδών (chelidon) meaning "swallow (bird)".
Circe f Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Κίρκη (Kirke), possibly from κίρκος (kirkos) meaning "hawk". In Greek mythology Circe was a sorceress who changed Odysseus's crew into hogs, as told in Homer's Odyssey. Odysseus forced her to change them back, then stayed with her for a year before continuing his voyage.
Corbin m English
From a French surname that was derived from corbeau "raven", originally denoting a person who had dark hair. The name was probably popularized in America by actor Corbin Bernsen (1954-).
Crawford m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "crow ford" in Old English.
Cuauhtemoc m Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "descending eagle" in Nahuatl, from cuāuhtli "eagle" and temo "descend". This was the name of the last Aztec emperor, ruling until he was captured and executed by the Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés in the year 1525.
Deryn f & m Welsh
Possibly from the Welsh word deryn, a variant of aderyn meaning "bird".
Dror m Hebrew
Means "freedom" or "sparrow" in Hebrew.
Enara f Basque
Means "swallow (bird)" in Basque.
Enguerrand m Medieval French
Medieval French form of the Germanic name Engilram, which was composed of the elements angil, the name of a Germanic tribe known in English as the Angles, and hramn "raven". This was the name of several French nobles from Picardy.
Énna m Old Irish
Possibly from Old Irish én meaning "bird". This was the name of several Irish kings and heroes. It was also borne by a 6th-century saint who built the monastery of Killeany on Aran.
Faigel f Yiddish (Rare)
From Yiddish פֿויגל (foigl) meaning "bird", a vernacular form of Zipporah.
Féchín m Old Irish
Means "little raven" from Old Irish fiach "raven" combined with a diminutive suffix. This was the name of an Irish saint of the 7th century, the founder of the monastery at Fore. He died of the yellow plague.
Fiachna m Irish Mythology, Old Irish
Derived from Irish fiach meaning "raven". This is the name of several characters from Irish legend. It was also borne by Fiachna mac Báetáin, a 7th-century king of Dál Araide.
Fiachra m Irish, Irish Mythology
From Old Irish Fiachrae, possibly from fiach "raven" or fích "battle" combined with "king". This was the name of several legendary figures, including one of the four children of Lir transformed into swans for a period of 900 years. This is also the name of the patron saint of gardeners: a 7th-century Irish abbot who settled in France, usually called Saint Fiacre.
Fulton m English
From a surname that was derived from the name of the town of Foulden in Norfolk, itself meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
Guntram m German
Means "war raven" from the Germanic elements gund "war" and hramn "raven". This was the name of a 6th-century Frankish king.
Gwalchmai m Welsh Mythology
Derived from Welsh gwalch "hawk", possibly combined with Mai "May (the month)" or mai "field, plain". This is the name of a character in Welsh legend (appearing in Culhwch and Olwen for example). He is probably the antecedent of Gawain from later Arthurian romance.
Haytham m Arabic
Means "young eagle" in Arabic.
Hrafn m Icelandic, Old Norse
Means "raven" in Old Norse.
Hrafnhildr f Old Norse
From the Old Norse elements hrafn "raven" and hildr "battle".
Isapo-Muxika m Indigenous American, Siksika
From Siksika Issapóómahksika meaning "big Crow foot", from Issapó "Crow (tribe)", ómahk "big" and ika "foot". This was the name of a Blackfoot chief, known as Crowfoot (1830-1890).
Korbinian m German
Derived from Latin corvus meaning "raven". This was the name of an 8th-century Frankish saint who was sent by Pope Gregory II to evangelize in Bavaria. His real name may have been Hraban (see Raban).
Koronis f Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek κορώνη (korone) meaning "crow". This was the name of several figures from Greek mythology, including the mother of the god Asklepios.
Mekaisto m Indigenous American, Siksika
From Siksika Mí'kiai'stoowa meaning "red crow", from mi'ki "red" and mai'stóó "crow". Red Crow (1830-1900) was a chief of the Kainai Blackfoot.
Mupitsukupʉ m Indigenous American, Comanche
Means "old owl" in Comanche, derived from mupitsi "owl" and tsukupʉ "old man". This name was borne by a 19th-century chief of the Penateka Comanche.
Parastoo f Persian
Means "swallow (bird)" in Persian.
Qinnuajuaq f & m Indigenous American, Inuit
Means "rough-legged hawk" in Inuktitut (species Buteo lagopus).
Quetzalli f Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "feather (from the quetzal bird)" or "precious thing" in Nahuatl.
Raban m Ancient Germanic
From a Germanic byname derived from hraban meaning "raven".
Rambert m Ancient Germanic
Derived from the Germanic elements hramn "raven" and beraht "bright".
Raven f & m English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
Ronne m Frisian
Frisian short form of Germanic names beginning with the element hraban meaning "raven".
Sacagawea f Indigenous American
Probably from Hidatsa tsakáka wía meaning "bird woman". Alternatively it could originate from the Shoshone language and mean "boat puller". This name was borne by a Native American woman who guided the explorers Lewis and Clark. She was of Shoshone ancestry but had been abducted in her youth and raised by a Hidatsa tribe.
Shakuntala f Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit शकुन्त (shakunta) meaning "bird". This is the name of a character in Hindu legend, her story adapted by Kalidasa for the 5th-century play Abhijnanashakuntalam. It tells how Shakuntala, who was raised in the forest by birds, meets and marries the king Dushyanta. After a curse is laid upon them Dushyanta loses his memory and they are separated, but eventually the curse is broken after the king sees the signet ring he gave her.
Shqipe f Albanian
From Albanian shqip meaning "Albanian". Additionally, the word shqipe means "eagle" in modern Albanian, a variant of older shkabë. These interrelated words are often the subject of competing claims that the one is derived from the other. The ultimate origin of shqip "Albanian" is uncertain, but it may be from shqipoj meaning "to say clearly".
Sparrow m & f English (Rare)
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English spearwa.
Suzume f Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese (suzume) meaning "sparrow", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that are pronounced the same way.
Tahlako m Indigenous American, Choctaw
Means "eagle" in Choctaw.
Tajra f Bosnian
Possibly from Arabic طائر (ta'ir) meaning "bird".
Þórarinn m Old Norse, Icelandic
Old Norse name derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see Thor) combined with arn "eagle".
Tsubame f Japanese (Rare)
From Japanese (tsubame) meaning "swallow (bird)" or other kanji that have the same pronunciation.
Tulugaq m & f Indigenous American, Greenlandic, Inuit
Means "raven" in Greenlandic and Inuktitut.
Ugochi f Western African, Igbo
Means "eagle of God" in Igbo, from ùgó meaning "eagle, honour" and Chi 2, referring to God.
Ugochukwu m Western African, Igbo
Means "eagle of God" in Igbo.
Vasco m Portuguese, Spanish, Italian
From the medieval Spanish name Velasco, which possibly meant "crow" in Basque. A famous bearer was the 15th-century Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama, the first person to sail from Europe around Africa to India.
Vega 2 f Astronomy
The name of a star in the constellation Lyra. Its name is from Arabic الواقع (al-Waqi') meaning "the swooping (eagle)".
Ve'keseha'e f Indigenous American, Cheyenne
Means "bird woman" in Cheyenne, derived from vé'kėséhe- "bird" and the feminine suffix -e'é.
Ve'keseheveho m Indigenous American, Cheyenne
Means "bird chief" in Cheyenne, derived from vé'kėséhe- "bird" and vého "chief".
Waman m Indigenous American, Quechua
Means "eagle, falcon" in Quechua.
Wambli m & f Indigenous American, Sioux
From Lakota waŋblí meaning "eagle".
Wolfram m German
Derived from the Germanic element wulf meaning "wolf" combined with hramn meaning "raven".
Wren f English (Modern)
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
Zipporah f Biblical, Hebrew
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
Zitkala f Indigenous American, Sioux
From Lakota zitkála meaning "bird".