Old High German Origin Names

This is a list of names in which the origin is Old High German. Old High German was a West Germanic language spoken in southern Germany.
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ÆLFHEAH m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements ælf "elf" and heah "high". This was the name of an 11th-century archbishop of Canterbury, a saint and martyr, who is commonly known as Alphege or Elphege.
ALPHEGE m History
Middle English form of ÆLFHEAH.
ASTON m & f English (Rare)
From a surname that was originally derived from either a place name meaning "east town" in Old English or from the given name ÆÐELSTAN.
BAXTER m English
From an occupational surname that meant "(female) baker" in Old English.
BECKETT m English (Modern)
From an English surname that could be derived from various sources, including from Middle English beke meaning "beak" or bekke meaning "stream, brook".
BERGLJÓT f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of BERGLJOT.
BERGLJOT f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Bergljót, which was composed of the elements berg "protection, help" and ljótr "light".
BRAD m English
Short form of BRADLEY, BRADFORD, and other names beginning with Brad. A famous bearer is American actor Brad Pitt (1963-).
BRADLEY m English
From a surname that originally came from a place name meaning "broad clearing" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the World War II American general Omar Bradley (1893-1981).
DAGNEY f Various
Variant of DAGNY.
DAGNIJA f Latvian
Latvian form of DAGNY.
DAGNY f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From the Old Norse name Dagný, which was derived from the elements dagr "day" and nýr "new".
DAGNÝ f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Old Norse and Icelandic form of DAGNY.
EASTON m English (Modern)
From an English surname that was derived from place names meaning "east town" in Old English.
FAIGA f Yiddish
Variant of FAIGEL.
FAIGEL f Yiddish (Rare)
From Yiddish פֿויגל (foigl) meaning "bird", a vernacular form of Zipporah.
FEIGE f Yiddish
Variant of FAIGEL.
FOX m English (Modern)
Either from the English word fox or the surname Fox, which originally given as a nickname. The surname was borne by George Fox (1624-1691), the founder of the Quakers.
FREEMAN m English
From an English surname meaning "free man". It originally denoted a person who was not a serf.
FULTON m English
From a surname that was derived from the name of the town of Foulden in Norfolk, itself meaning "bird hill" in Old English.
HARLAN m English
From a surname that was from a place name meaning "hare land" in Old English. In America it has sometimes been given in honour of Supreme Court justice John Marshall Harlan (1833-1911).
HARLAND m English
From a surname that was a variant of HARLAN.
HARLEY m & f English
From a surname that was derived from a place name, itself from Old English hara "hare" and leah "woodland, clearing".
HERSH m Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish הירש (see HIRSH).
HERSHEL m American, Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of HIRSH. As a non-Jewish American name (somewhat common around the end of the 19th century), it was likely inspired by the German surname HERSCHEL, borne for instance by the British-German astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822).
HESHEL m Yiddish (Rare)
Yiddish diminutive of HIRSH.
HIRSH m Yiddish
Means "deer" in Yiddish, a vernacular form of Tzvi. The deer is particularly associated with the tribe of Naphtali (see Genesis 49:21).
HIRSHEL m Yiddish
Yiddish diminutive of HIRSH.
KEMP m English (Rare)
From a surname derived from Middle English kempe meaning "champion, athlete, warrior".
KIEFER m English (Modern)
From a German surname meaning either "pine tree" or "barrel maker".
KREINE f Yiddish (Rare)
From Yiddish קרוין (kroin) meaning "crown".
LELLE m Swedish
Diminutive of LENNART.
LEN m English
Short form of LEONARD.
LENARD m English
Variant of LEONARD.
LENART m Slovene
Slovene form of LEONARD.
LENNART m Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Low German, Dutch
Swedish and Low German form of LEONARD.
LENNI m Finnish
Finnish diminutive of LENNART.
LENNIE m English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LENNY m English
Diminutive of LEONARD.
LÉONARD m French
French form of LEONARD.
LEONARD m English, Dutch, German, Ancient Germanic
Means "brave lion", derived from the Germanic elements lewo "lion" (of Latin origin) and hard "brave, hardy". This was the name of a 5th-century Frankish saint from Noblac who is the patron of prisoners and horses. The Normans brought this name to England, where it was used steadily through the Middle Ages, becoming even more common in the 20th century.
LEONARDA f Italian
Feminine form of LEONARDO.
LEONARDO m Italian, Spanish, Portuguese
Italian, Spanish and Portuguese form of LEONARD. A notable bearer was Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519), an Italian artist and scientist of the Renaissance. He is known as the inventor of several contraptions, including flying machines, as well as the painter of the 'Mona Lisa'. Another famous bearer was Leonardo Fibonacci, a 13th-century Italian mathematician. A more recent bearer is American actor Leonardo DiCaprio (1974-).
LEONHARD m German
German form of LEONARD. Leonhard Euler was a Swiss mathematician who made many important contributions to calculus, number theory, geometry and theoretical physics.
LINDEN m English
From a German surname that was derived from Old High German linta meaning "linden tree".
LINDON m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of LYNDON.
LINTON m English
From a surname that was originally from place names meaning either "flax town" or "linden tree town" in Old English.
LINWOOD m English
From a surname that was originally from a place name meaning "stream forest" in Old English.
LYNDON m English
From an English surname that was derived from a place name meaning "linden tree hill" in Old English. A famous bearer was American president Lyndon B. Johnson (1908-1973).
LYNWOOD m English
Variant of LINWOOD.
MARQUIS m African American
From a noble title that derives from the Old French word marche "march, borderland". The title originally referred to someone who ruled on the borderlands of a realm.
MARQUISE m African American (Modern)
Variant of MARQUIS. Technically, marquise is the feminine form of the title marquis.
MARQUITA f African American
Feminine variant of MARQUIS.
MASON m English
From an English surname meaning "stoneworker", from an Old French word of Germanic origin (akin to Old English macian "to make").
MINNA f German (Archaic), Finnish, Swedish
Means "love" in Old German, specifically medieval courtly love. It is also used as a short form of WILHELMINA. This is the name of the title character in the play 'Minna von Barnhelm' (1767) by Gotthold Ephraim Lessing.
NEWT m English
Short form of NEWTON.
NEWTON m English
From a surname that was originally derived from a place name meaning "new town" in Old English. A famous bearer of the surname was the English physicist Isaac Newton (1643-1727).
OGDEN m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "oak valley" in Old English. A famous bearer was the humourous American poet Ogden Nash (1902-1971).
RADCLIFF m English (Rare)
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "red cliff" in Old English.
RADCLYFFE m English (Rare)
From a surname, a variant of RADCLIFF.
READ m English (Rare)
From a surname that was a variant of REED.
REED m English
From an English surname that is derived from Old English read meaning "red", originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
REID m English
From a surname, a Scots variant of REED.
ROOSEVELT m English
From a Dutch surname meaning "rose field". This name is often given in honour of American presidents Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) or Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945).
SHAINA f Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish שיינאַ (see SHAYNA).
SHANA (2) f Yiddish
Alternate transcription of Yiddish שיינאַ (see SHAYNA).
SHAYNA f Yiddish
From Yiddish שיין (shein) meaning "beautiful".
SHAYNAH f Yiddish (Rare)
Alternate transcription of Yiddish שיינאַ (see SHAYNA).
SIGNE f Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, Latvian
Modern Scandinavian form of SIGNÝ.
SIGNY f Norwegian
Norwegian variant form of SIGNÝ.
SIGNÝ f Ancient Scandinavian, Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Old Norse name that was derived from the elements sigr "victory" and nýr "new". In Norse legend she was the twin sister of Sigmund and the wife of Siggeir.
STAR f English
From the English word for the celestial body, ultimately from Old English steorra.
STARLA f English
Elaborated form of STAR.
STARR f English
Variant of STAR.
ÞÓRA f Ancient Scandinavian, Icelandic
Either a feminine form of Þórr (see THOR) or else a short form of the various Old Norse names beginning with the element Þór. In Norse myth Thora was the wife of the Danish king Ragnar Lodbrok.
ÞÓRNÝ f Ancient Scandinavian
Old Norse form of TORNY.
TOIBA f Yiddish (Rare)
From Yiddish טויב (toib) meaning "dove".
TONE (2) f Norwegian
Variant of TORNY.
TONJE f Norwegian
Variant of TORNY.
TORA f Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
Modern form of ÞÓRA.
TORNY f Norwegian
From the Old Norse name Þórný, which was derived from the name of the Norse god Þórr (see THOR) combined with nýr "new".
TORØ f Norwegian
Norwegian variant of TORA.
UNNI f Norwegian
Possibly a modern coinage based on the Old Norse elements unnr "to wave, to billow" or unna "to love" combined with nýr "new".
VAN m English
Short form of names containing van, such as VANCE or IVAN.
VANCE m English
From an English surname that was derived from Old English fenn meaning "marsh, fen".
VARG m Norwegian, Swedish
Means "wolf" in Old Norse.
WALTON m English
From a surname that was originally taken from various Old English place names meaning "stream town", "wood town", or "wall town".
WAYNE m English
From an occupational surname meaning "wagon maker", derived from Old English wægn "wagon". Use of it as a given name can be partly attributed to the popularity of the actor John Wayne (1907-1979). Another famous bearer is Canadian hockey player Wayne Gretzky (1961-), generally considered the greatest player in the history of the sport.
WEBSTER m English
From an occupational surname meaning "weaver", derived from Old English webba.
WES m English
Short form of WESLEY.
WESLEY m English
From a surname that was derived from a place name meaning "west meadow" in Old English. It has been sometimes given in honour of John Wesley (1703-1791), the founder of Methodism.
WESTLEY m English
From a surname that was a variant of WESLEY.
WINFIELD m English
From a surname that originated from various English place names, themselves derived from Old English winn "meadow, pasture" and feld "field".
WINTHROP m English
From a surname that was originally taken from town names meaning either "WINE's village" or "WIGMUND's village" in Old English.
WRIGHT m English
From an occupational surname meaning "craftsman", ultimately from Old English wyrhta. Famous bearers of the surname were the Wright brothers (Wilbur 1867-1912 and Orville 1871-1948), the inventors of the first successful airplane, and Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), an American architect.