Names Categorized "fleetwood mac songs"

This is a list of names in which the categories include fleetwood mac songs.
gender
usage
ANGEL m & f English, Bulgarian, Macedonian
From the medieval Latin masculine name Angelus, which was derived from the name of the heavenly creature (itself derived from the Greek word ἄγγελος (angelos) meaning "messenger"). It has never been very common in the English-speaking world, where it is sometimes used as a feminine name in modern times.
BUDDY m English
From the English word meaning "friend". It probably originated as a nursery form of the word brother.
CRYSTAL f English
From the English word crystal for the clear, colourless glass, sometimes cut into the shape of a gemstone. The English word derives ultimately from Greek κρύσταλλος (krystallos) meaning "ice". It has been in use as a given name since the 19th century.
DANNY m English, Dutch
Diminutive of DANIEL.
DESTINY f English
Means simply "destiny, fate" from the English word, ultimately from Latin destinare "to determine", a derivative of stare "to stand". It has been used as a given name in the English-speaking world only since the last half of the 20th century.
DIANE f French, English
French form of DIANA, also regularly used in the English-speaking world.
DREAM f English (Modern)
From the English word dream referring to imaginary events seen in the mind while sleeping or a hope or wish.
EARL m English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl "nobleman, warrior". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
EMERALD f English (Modern)
From the word for the green precious stone, which is the birthstone of May. The emerald supposedly imparts love to the bearer. The word is ultimately from Greek σμάραγδος (smaragdos).
GRAY m & f English
From an English surname meaning "grey", originally given to a person who had grey hair or clothing.
GREY m & f English (Modern)
Variant of GRAY.
GYPSY f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word Gypsy for the nomadic people who originated in northern India. The word was originally a corruption of Egyptian. It is sometimes considered pejorative.
HEAVEN f English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word meaning "paradise".
HONEY f English (Rare)
Simply from the English word honey, ultimately from Old English hunig. This was originally a nickname for a sweet person.
JAM m Persian Mythology
Persian form of Avestan Yima meaning "twin" (related to Sanskrit Yama). This was the name of a mythological king, more commonly called Jamshid.
JUDY f English
Diminutive of JUDITH. A well-known bearer of this name was the American singer and actress Judy Garland (1922-1969).
JULIET f English
Anglicized form of JULIETTE or GIULIETTA. This spelling was first used by Shakespeare for the lover of Romeo in his play Romeo and Juliet (1596).
LADY f Spanish (Latin American)
From the English noble title Lady, derived from Old English hlæfdige, originally meaning "bread kneader". This name grew in popularity in Latin America after the marriage of Diana Spencer, known as Lady Di, to Prince Charles in 1981 and her death in 1997.
LINE f Danish, Norwegian, French
Short form of CAROLINE and other names ending in line.
LOVE (2) f English
Simply from the English word love, derived from Old English lufu.
MADGE f English
Diminutive of MARGARET.
MARE f Estonian, Slovene, Macedonian, Croatian
Diminutive of MARIA and other names beginning with Mar.
MIRANDA f English, Dutch
Derived from Latin mirandus meaning "admirable, wonderful". The name was created by Shakespeare for the heroine in his play The Tempest (1611), about a father and daughter stranded on an island. It did not become a common English given name until the 20th century. This is also the name of one of the moons of Uranus, named after the Shakespearean character.
MONDAY f English (Rare)
From the English word for the day of the week, which was derived from Old English mona "moon" and dæg "day". This was formerly given to girls born on Monday.
RAIN (1) f & m English (Rare)
Simply from the English word rain, derived from Old English regn.
RED m English
From the English word, ultimately derived from Old English read. It was originally a nickname given to a person with red hair or a ruddy complexion.
RHIANNON f Welsh, English, Welsh Mythology
Probably derived from the old Celtic name Rigantona meaning "great queen". It is speculated that this was the name of an otherwise unattested Celtic goddess of fertility and the moon. The name Rhiannon appears later in Welsh legend in the Mabinogion, borne by the wife of Pwyll and the mother of Pryderi.... [more]
RICKY m English
Diminutive of RICHARD.
SILVER m & f English (Rare)
From the English word for the precious metal or the colour, ultimately derived from Old English seolfor.
STONE m English (Modern)
From the English vocabulary word, ultimately from Old English stan.
SUNNY f & m English
From the English word meaning "sunny, cheerful".
TRINITY f English
From the English word Trinity, given in honour of the Christian belief that God has one essence, but three distinct expressions of being: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It has only been in use as a given name since the 20th century.
WILL m English
Short form of WILLIAM or other names beginning with Will. A famous bearer is American actor Will Smith (1968-), whose full name is Willard.