Names Categorized "noble titles"

This is a list of names in which the categories include noble titles.
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ÆÐELRÆD m Anglo-Saxon
Derived from the Old English elements æðel "noble" and ræd "counsel". This was the name of two Saxon kings of England including Æðelræd II "the Unready" whose realm was overrun by the Danes in the early 11th century. The name was rarely used after the Norman Conquest.
AMIR (1) m Arabic, Persian, Urdu, Malay, Indonesian
Means "commander, prince" in Arabic. This was originally a title, which has come into English as the Arabic loanword emir.
BRENDAN m Irish, English, Breton
From Brendanus, the Latinized form of the Irish name Bréanainn, which was derived from a Welsh word meaning "prince". Saint Brendan was a 6th-century Irish abbot who, according to legend, crossed the Atlantic and reached North America with 17 other monks.
CLARENCE m English
From the Latin title Clarensis, which belonged to members of the British royal family. The title ultimately derives from the name of the town of Clare in Suffolk. As a given name it has been in use since the 19th century.
CYRUS m English, Biblical, Biblical Latin, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From Κυρος (Kyros), the Greek form of the Persian name Kūrush, which may mean "far sighted" or "young". The name is sometimes associated with Greek κυριος (kyrios) "lord". It was borne by several kings of Persia, including Cyrus the Great, who conquered Babylon. He is famous in the Old Testament for freeing the captive Jews and allowing them to return to Israel. As an English name, it first came into use among the Puritans after the Protestant Reformation.
DUKE m English
From the noble title duke, which was originally derived from Latin dux "leader".
EARL m English
From the aristocratic title, which derives from Old English eorl "nobleman, warrior". It has been used as a given name since the 19th century.
EMYR m Welsh
Means "king, lord" in Welsh.
GWRTHEYRN m Ancient Celtic
Means "supreme king" from Welsh gor meaning "over" and teyrn meaning "king, monarch". It is possible that this is not a name, but a title. Gwrtheyrn (also known as Vortigern) was a 5th-century king of the Britons. It was he who invited Horsa and Hengist to Britain, which eventually led to the Anglo-Saxon conquest of England.
JARL m Norwegian, Swedish, Danish, Norse Mythology, Ancient Scandinavian
Means "chieftain, nobleman, earl" in Old Norse. In Norse legend Jarl was the son of the god Ríg and the founder of the race of warriors.
KAISER m Various
German form of the Roman title Caesar (see CAESAR). It is not used as a given name in Germany itself.
KHALEESI f Literature
From a title used in the George R. R. Martin book series 'A Song of Ice and Fire' (first published 1996) and the television adaptation 'Game of Thrones' (2011-2019). It is a feminine form of the Dothraki title khal meaning "warlord". In the series Daenerys Targaryen gains this title after she marries Khal Drogo.
KING m English
From a nickname that derives from the English word king, ultimately from Old English cyning.
KYRILLOS m Ancient Greek
Greek form of CYRIL.
LAIRD m English (Rare)
From a Scottish surname meaning "landowner".
MARQUIS m African American
From a noble title that derives from the Old French word marche "march, borderland". The title originally referred to someone who ruled on the borderlands of a realm.
MARQUISE m African American (Modern)
Variant of MARQUIS. Technically, marquise is the feminine form of the title marquis.
MINOS m Greek Mythology
Possibly from a Cretan word or title meaning "king". This was the name of a king of Crete in Greek mythology. He was the son of Zeus and Europa. Because Minos had refused to sacrifice a certain bull to Poseidon, the god had caused his wife Pasiphaë to mate with the bull, which produced the half-bull creature called the Minotaur. Minos had Daedalus construct the Labyrinth to house the beast, but it was eventually slain by Theseus.
MUIREDACH m Irish
Means "lord" in Irish. This was the name of several legendary and historical kings of Ireland.
NALANI f & m Hawaiian
Means "the heavens" or "the chiefs" from Hawaiian , a definite article, and lani "heaven, sky, chief".
NERYS f Welsh
Perhaps an elaboration of Welsh ner "lord", with the intended meaning of "lady".
PRINCE m English
From the English word prince, a royal title, which comes ultimately from Latin princeps. This name was borne by the American musician Prince Rogers Nelson (1958-2016), who is known simply as Prince.
PRINCESS f English (Modern)
Feminine equivalent of PRINCE.
QUEEN f English
From an old nickname that was derived from the English word queen, ultimately from Old English cwen meaning "woman, wife".
RAJA (2) m Urdu, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Malayalam, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi, Indonesian
Means "king, ruler", from Sanskrit राजन् (rajan).
SARGON m Akkadian (Anglicized), Biblical, Biblical Hebrew
From the Hebrew form סַרְגּוֹן (Sargon) of the Akkadian name Sharru-ukin, from šarru meaning "king" and kīnu meaning "legitimate, true". This was the name of the first king of the Akkadian Empire, beginning in the 24th century BC. It was also borne by the 8th-century BC Assyrian king Sargon II, who appears briefly in the Old Testament. The usual English spelling of the name is based on this biblical mention, applied retroactively to the earlier king.
SAYYID m Arabic
Means "lord, master" in Arabic. A famous bearer was the Egyptian musician Sayyid Darwish (1892-1923).
SULTAN m & f Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Avar
Means "ruler, king, sultan" in Arabic. In the Arab world this name is typically masculine, but Turkey it is given to both boys and girls.
THANE m English (Rare)
From the Scottish and English noble title, which was originally from Old English thegn.
TORIN m Irish
Means "chief" in Irish Gaelic.