Roman Mythology Submitted Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of the Romans.
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Submitted names are contributed by users of this website. The accuracy of these name definitions cannot be guaranteed.
ABUNDANTIA f Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Italian
Feminine form of Abundantius. She was the Roman personification of abundance, prosperity and good fortune, portrayed as distributing grain and money from a cornucopia. (The mythological character has survived in French folklore as Lady Hobunde.) The name was also borne by an Italian saint martyred during the persecutions of emperor Diocletian.
ACCALIA f Roman Mythology (?), English (Rare)
According to questionable sources, such as baby name books and websites, this was another name for Acca, the human foster-mother of Romulus and Remus in Roman legend, also known as Acca Larentia (see Acca)... [more]
ACHATES m Roman Mythology, Greek Mythology
Perhaps derived from the name of a river in Sicily, Italy, or from the name of the type of rock often found there. This is the name of two separate characters in Roman and Greek mythology.
ACMON m Roman Mythology
A companion of Aeneas.
ADEONA f Roman Mythology
The Roman goddess who guides the child back home, after it has left the parental house for the first time and monitored its coming and going in learning to walk.
AEQUITAS m & f Roman Mythology
Means "equity, equality, fairness" in Latin. During the Roman Empire, Aequitas as a divine personification was part of the religious propaganda of the emperor, under the name Aequitas Augusti, which also appeared on coins... [more]
AGENORIA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who endowed a child with the capacity to lead an active (actus) life. Her name is presumably derived from the Latin verb ago, agere, egi, actum, "to do, drive, go."
ALATOR m Celtic Mythology, Roman Mythology
An epithet of Mars found on an altar at South Shields in England, and on a votive plaque found in Hertfordshire in England. There is disagreement of its meaning, with some academics interpreting it as "hunstman" and others as "cherisher"... [more]
ALBUNEA f Roman Mythology
A Roman nymph of the sulfuric spring near Tibur (the current Tivoli).... [more]
ALEMONA f Roman Mythology
Roman birth deity that feeds the embryo or generally nourished growth in utero.
ALEMONIA f Roman Mythology
Perhaps related to Greek ἀλήμων (ălēmon) "a wanderer, rover". In Roman mythology, Alemona or Alemonia was a minor, tutelary goddess of the fetus, the entity responsible for feeding the unborn child (i.e., nourishing growth in utero).
AMICITIA f Roman Mythology (Anglicized)
Means "friendship" in Latin. Amicitia was the Roman goddess of friendship and affection. Her Greek equivalent is Philotes.
ANCHISES m Roman Mythology
The father of Aeneas, from Virgil's 'The Aeneid'.
ANGITIA f Roman Mythology
A Roman snake-goddess who was especially worshipped by the Marsi, a tribe in central Italy.
ANNONARIA f Roman Mythology
Means "she who supplies corn" in Latin, derived from annona "yearly produce", "crop, harvest" or "corn, grain" (also the name of a Roman goddess who personified the year), which was ultimately from annus "year"... [more]
ARICIA f Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology, Literature, Theatre
Latinized form of the Greek Άρικία (Arikia), probably derived from Latin aro "to plough". Aricia was a niece of King Aegeus of Athens and became the wife of Virbius - the name by which Hippolytos went after he came back to life as a demigod... [more]
ASCANIUS m Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Son of Aeneas, from the Greek form Askanios.
AUSTER m Roman Mythology
Means "the south wind" in Latin. He was the Roman god of the south wind, who brought heavy cloud cover and fog or humidity.
AVENTINUS m Roman Mythology
This name can be traced to the Aventine Hill, allegedly one of the Seven Hills that Ancient Rome was founded upon. Aventinus of Alba Longa was a mythical king said to have been buried there. It is debated as to whether the hill was named for the figure, or vice versa... [more]
AVERRUNCUS m Roman Mythology
In ancient Roman religion, Averruncus or Auruncus is a god of averting harm. Aulus Gellius says that he is one of the potentially malignant deities who must be propitiated for their power to both inflict and withhold disaster from people and the harvests.... [more]
CAELIFER m Roman Mythology
From a poetic Latin epithet of the Greek god Atlas which meant "supporting the heavens", from caelum "heaven" and ferre "to bear, to carry, to bring". In Greek mythology Atlas was a Titan punished by Zeus by being forced to support the heavens on his shoulders.
CAELUS m Roman Mythology
The name of the god of the sky in Roman mythology. Meaning "sky" or "the heavens." Origin of the English word "celestial"
CAIETA f Roman Mythology
The name of Aeneas's wet-nurse in the Aeneid.... [more]
CAMENA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who enables the child to sing.
CANDELIFERA f Roman Mythology
The cyclical place of the goddess Candelifera, "She who bears the candle," is uncertain. It is sometimes thought that she provides an artificial light for labor that occurs at night. A long labor was considered likely for first-time mothers, so at least a part of the birthing process would occur at night... [more]
CAPRICORNUS m Roman Mythology, Astronomy
Means "goat" in Latin. The name of one of the constellations of the zodiac.
CARMENTA f Roman Mythology
From Latin carmen "song, verse, enchantment, religious formula", from canere "to sing" (the notion is of chanting or reciting verses of magical power). In Roman legend Carmenta was a goddess of prophecy and childbirth, the mother of Evander by Mercury... [more]
CARNA f Roman Mythology
The goddess who makes strong muscles, and defends the internal organs from witches or strigae.
CATIUS m Roman Mythology
God invoked for sharpening the minds of children as they develop intellectually
CINXIA f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of conception. She functions within the belt (cingulum) that the bride wears to symbolize that her husband is "belted and bound" (cinctus vinctusque) to her. It was tied with the knot of Hercules, intended to be intricate and difficult to untie... [more]
CONSEVIUS m Roman Mythology
The god of propagation and insemination, from con-serere, "to sow." It is a title of Janus as a creator god or god of beginnings.
CUBA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who helped the child transition from cradle to bed.
CUNINA f Roman Mythology
The goddess who protected the cradle from malevolent magic.
CUPIDON m Roman Mythology (Gallicized), Literature, French (African, Rare)
French form of Cupid. It was mentioned in Marquis de Sade's novel 'The 120 Days of Sodom' (1785) as belonging to one of the male victims.
DECLUNA f Roman Mythology
An important goddess (or perhaps god, known as DECLUNUS) of the Volscians, an ancient people of Italy who were frequently at war with the Romans and subsequently conquered and assimilated. Specific knowledge of the god has been lost but he (or she) was perhaps a fertility deity.
DECLUNUS m Roman Mythology
An important god (or perhaps goddess, known as DECLUNA) of the Volscians, an ancient people of Italy who were frequently at war with the Romans and subsequently conquered and assimilated. Specific knowledge of the god has been lost but he (or she) was perhaps a fertility deity.
DEIPHOBE f Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Deiphobos. In Greek and Roman mythology, Deiphobe was a daughter of the seer Glaukos, an oracle of Apollo at Cumae in Italy, and later became known as the Cumaean Sybil. It was from her that the last king of Rome, Tarquin the Proud, received the three Sybilline Books that contained such important prophecies concerning Rome... [more]
DEVERRA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who gives the broom with which grain was swept up (verrere) (compare Averruncus).
DIANUS m Roman Mythology
Masculine form of Diana. This was the name of an obscure god in Roman mythology. Some experts theorize that Dianus is not a separate god on his own; they claim that Dianus is merely a different name for Ianus (see Janus).
DIESPITER m Roman Mythology
Variant of Jupiter, also known as Jove, a god who brings the birthing baby toward the daylight.
DISCORDIA f Roman Mythology
Means "discord, dissension" in Latin. This was the name of the Roman goddess of strife, equivalent to the Greek goddess Eris.
DOMIDUCA f Roman Mythology
The goddess Domiduca protects children on the way back to their parents' home. Her male counterpart was Domitius, Domidius or Domiducus, from domus, "house," and eo, ire, itum, "to go."... [more]
EDUSA f Roman Mythology
A goddess who enables the taking of nourishment. The variations of her name may indicate that while her functional focus was narrow, her name had not stabilized; she was mainly a divine force to be invoked ad hoc for a specific purpose... [more]
EGERIA f Roman Mythology
Possibly connected to Greek αἴγειρος (aigeiros) meaning "black poplar", a type of tree (species Populus nigra). In Roman mythology this was the name of a nymph best known for her liaisons with Numa Pompilius, the legendary second king of Rome (after Romulus)... [more]
ELIUS f Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology
From Greek and Roman Mythology.... [more]
ERYCINA f Roman Mythology
Epithet of the Roman goddess Venus which meant "of Eryx", Eryx being a mountain on Sicily famous for a temple dedicated to Venus on its summit.
FABULINUS m Roman Mythology
The god who invoked the first instance of articulate speech, whose name derives form fari, "to speak"; cf. fabula.
FARINUS m Roman Mythology
The god who invoked speech in children.
FAVONIUS m Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Roman family name of disputed origin. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it is from Latin favere "to favor"; Ernest Klein says, by dissimilation from *fovonius, literally "the warming wind", from fovere "to warm"... [more]
FLUONIA f Roman Mythology
Derives from fluo, fluere, "to flow," is a form of Juno who retains the nourishing blood within the womb. Women attended to the cult of Juno Fluonia "because she held back the flow of blood (i.e., menstruation) in the act of conception" and pregnancy... [more]
FORTUNA f Spanish (Latin American), Roman Mythology
Means "fortune, chance, fate, good luck" in Latin, the Roman concept often personified as a goddess (equivalent to the Greek spirit of fortune, chance, providence and fate Tyche); "her wheel betokens vicissitude"... [more]
FULGORA f Roman Mythology
From Latin fulgur meaning "lightning", which is derived from fulgeo "to flash, lighten, shine". In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess who presided over lightning, equivalent to the Greek goddess Astrape.
GRADIVUS m Roman Mythology
An epithet of the Roman god Mars meaning "he who marches (into battle)" from Latin gradus "step, pace, gait, stride, walk". 'Mars Gradivus had a temple outside the Porta Capena on the Appian road, and it is said that king Numa appointed twelve Salii as priests of this god.'
INTERCIDONA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who provides the axe without which trees cannot be cut (intercidere).
INTERDUCA f Roman Mythology
The goddess that accompanies the child in leaving and returning to the home. See also Adeona.
INUUS m Roman Mythology
Meaning, "entry." The phallic god Mutunus Tutunus, and Pertunda enable sexual penetration. Inuus, sometimes identified with Faunus, embodies the mammalian impulse toward mating. The cult of Mutunus was associated with the sacred fascinum... [more]
INVIDIA f Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
This was the Roman equal of demigoddess Nemesis, who ruled over revenge. From the Latin word invidere meaning "to look against, to look at in a hostile manner".
IUVERNA f Roman Mythology
Latinate version of JUVERNA
JUGATINUS m Roman Mythology
The name of a Roman conjugal god, from iugare, "to join, yoke, marry."
KOUIRINOS m Roman Mythology (Hellenized), Late Roman (Hellenized)
Variant form of Kyrinos, which is the main Greek form of Quirinus.
LARENTIA f Roman Mythology
Apparently derived from the Latin term Lares referring to minor guardian gods, the origin of which is unknown. There may be a connection to Latin larva "ghost, spectre" or larvo "to enchant, bewitch"... [more]
LEVANA f Roman Mythology
The goddess Levana lifts the baby (from levare "to lift), who was ceremonially placed on the ground after birth in symbolic contact with Mother Earth. The midwife then cut the umbilical cord and presented the newborn to the mother, a scene sometimes depicted on sarcophagi... [more]
LIBERA f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of wine, fertility, and freedom who empowers the woman to release her semen. See also Liber.
LIBERTAS f Roman Mythology
Derived from the Latin noun libertas meaning "freedom, liberty". In Roman mythology, Libertas was the name of the goddess of liberty.
LOCUTIUS m Roman Mythology
God that enabled children to form sentences.
LUA f Roman Mythology
Lua was a Roman goddess who expiated blood shed in battle and to whom soldiers sacrificed captured weapons.... [more]
LUSCINIA f English (Rare), Spanish (Latin American, Rare), Italian (Rare), Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin luscinia "nightingale". This was an epithet of the Roman goddess Minerva. As an English name, it has been used sparingly since the 19th century.
MAMERS m Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Oscan-Italic form of Mars.
MANIA f Etruscan Mythology, Roman Mythology
Feminization of Manius. The name of the Roman and Etruscan Goddess of death.
MARICA f Roman Mythology
In Roman mythology, Marica was a nymph, the mother of Latinus. Latinus was fathered by Faunus, who was also occasionally referred to as the son of Marica. The sacred forest near Minturnae was dedicated to Marica... [more]
MEDITRINA f Roman Mythology
Roman goddess of wine and health, possibly created to explain the Roman holiday of Meditrinalia (Oct. 11); generally taken to mean 'healer'
MELLONA f Roman Mythology, English (American, Rare, Archaic)
Mellona was an Ancient Roman goddess associated with the supply of honey. The name contains the latin word mel "honey".
MENA f Roman Mythology
Along with Juno, assured menstrual flow, and during pregnancy redirected its flow to feed the developing child.
MENS m Roman Mythology
Meaing, "mind" he was the god who provides a child with its intelligence.
MISERIA f Roman Mythology
Probably means "misery" in Latin. Miseria was the Roman Goddess of misery and woe and is the Roman equivalent of her Greek counterpart OIZYS.
MISERICORDIA f Spanish, Roman Mythology
Means "compassion" in Latin, ultimately from miser "poor, wretched" and cor "heart". In Roman mythology Misericordia was the personification of mercy, pity and compassion, equivalent to the Greek goddess Eleos... [more]
MUTUNUS m Roman Mythology
A phallic marriage deity, in some respects equated with Priapus.
NARIA f Roman Mythology, Celtic Mythology
Meaning unknown. Naria was a Gallo-Roman goddess worshiped in western Switzerland. While what she was goddess of is a mystery officially, it can be deduced from the sole image of her that she may have been a goddess of good luck and blessings, as her image was done in the generic style of Fortuna, the Roman goddess of luck.
NECESSITAS f Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Ancient roman form of Ananke the goddess of necessity
NEPTUNINE f Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Neptune used by Roman poet Catullus (64. 28) to refer to the Greek nymph Thetis, because she was a granddaughter of Poseidon, the Greek Neptune.
NOCTILUCA f Roman Mythology, Literature
From Latin noctilūca meaning "something that shines by night" - thus also "moon" and "lantern" - from nox "night" and luceo "to shine". It may be an epithet of the Roman goddess Juno... [more]
NOX m & f English (Rare), Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin nox "night", Nox is the Roman equivalent of Greek Nyx. As an English name, it is a variant of Knox.
NUMERIA f Roman Mythology
Derived from Latin numerus meaning "number". In Roman mythology, Numeria is the goddess who grants young children the ability to count.
NUNDINA f Roman Mythology
Nundina presides over the dies lustricus, the purification day when the child was given a name (praenomen). This occurred on the eighth day for girls and the ninth day for boys, a difference Plutarch explains by noting that "it is a fact that the female grows up, and attains maturity and perfection before the male." Until the umbilical cord fell off, typically on the seventh day, the baby was regarded as "more like a plant than an animal," as Plutarch expresses it... [more]
NYMPHA f Roman Mythology, Ancient Greek (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Νυμφη (Nymphe) meaning "bride". Nymphe was one of the twelve Horae, Greek goddesses of the hours, who presided over the "bath-hour". In the New Testament, Saint Paul mentions either Nympha or Nymphas in one of his epistles... [more]
OPIS f Roman Mythology
Variant (i.e., genitive case) of Ops.
OPS f Roman Mythology
Derived from the Latin noun ops which can mean "power, might, influence" as well as "aid, help, support" and "wealth, abundance, riches, resources." In Roman mythology, Ops (also called Opis) is a fertility goddess who is the wife of Saturn and mother of (among others) Jupiter and Juno.
ORCUS m Roman Mythology
Likely a Roman transliteration of Horcus. In Roman mythology, Orcus was a god of the underworld and the punisher of broken oaths.
OSSIPAGO f Roman Mythology
A god who built strong bones, from ossa, "bones," + pango, pangere, "insert, fix, set."
PARCA f Roman Mythology
One of the three goddesses of fate in relation to birthing. See also Nona and Decima. Parca or Partula oversees partus, birth as the initial separation from the mother's body (as in English '"postpartum")... [more]
PAVENTIA f Roman Mythology
The name of a minor Roman goddess, who protects against childhood fears (pavor), protects against sudden fright and comforts those who have been frightened.
PERTUNDA f Roman Mythology
Pertunda enabled sexual penetration. Pertunda is the female personification of the verb pertundere, "to penetrate", and seems to be a name for invoking a divine power specific to this function.
PETA f Roman Mythology
Goddess that saw to the infants first wants.
PILUMNUS m Roman Mythology
Meaning, "staker." The god who grants the pestle necessary for making flour from grain. He ensured children grew properly and stayed healthy. Ancient Romans made an extra bed after the birth of a child in order to ensure the help of Pilumnus... [more]
POSTVERTA f Roman Mythology
A goddess prayed to when a baby was being birthed head-first. See also Prosa.
POTINA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who enables a child to drink.
PREMA f Roman Mythology
Prema is the insistent sex act, from the verb primo, primere, to press upon. Although the verb usually describes the masculine role, Augustine calls Prema dea Mater, a mother goddess.
PRIMIGENIA f Roman Mythology
Roman name meaning "primal", an epithet of the Goddess Fortuna.
PROSA f Roman Mythology
A goddess who averts breech birth. See also Postverta.
PYRAMUS m Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
From the Greek Πυραμος (Pyramos), taken from the name of the river Pyramos and derived from Greek πυρ (pyr) "fire" or πυρος (pyros) "wheat". In classical mythology, he was the lover of Thisbe.
QUERELLA f Roman Mythology
Means "complaint, lamentation" in Latin. In Roman mythology Querella was the personification of mockery, blame, ridicule, scorn, complaint and stinging criticism, equivalent to the Greek daemon Momos (who was expelled from heaven for ridiculing the gods).
REMAS m Lithuanian, Roman Mythology
Lithuanian form of Remus.
RIVALITAS f Roman Mythology
Means "jealous rivalry" in Latin. She was the Roman equivalent of Nemesis.
RUMINA f Roman Mythology
A goddess who protected breastfeeding mothers, and possibly nursing infants. Her domain extended to protecting animal mothers, not just human ones. Rumina promoted suckling. This goddess received libations of milk, an uncommon liquid offering among the Romans.
SATOURNOUS m Roman Mythology (Hellenized)
Hellenized form of Saturnus (see Saturn).
SENTIA f Roman Mythology
In Roman mythology, Sentia is the goddess of child development and the bringer of awareness into young children. The English word "sentient" meaning "able to perceive or feel things", is derived from her name.
SENTINUS m Roman Mythology
God who gives sentience or the powers of sense perception (sensus). Augustine calls him the sensificator, "creator of sentience."
SIVART m Roman Mythology
The first name of Sivart creates a shrewd, aggressive, business nature, intent on personal gain.... [more]
SOMNUS m Roman Mythology
The Roman equivalent of Hypnos
SPES f Roman Mythology
Means "hope" in Latin. She was the Roman personification of hope.
STATINA f Roman Mythology
The goddess who gives the baby fitness or "straightness," (i.e. the ability to live) and the father held it up to acknowledge his responsibility to raise it. Unwanted children might be abandoned at the Temple of Pietas or the Columna Lactaria... [more]
SUADA f Roman Mythology
Related to Latin suadere meaning "to urge, persuade" from Proto-Indo-European *swad- (related to suavis "sweet"). She was the Roman personification of persuasion, seduction and charming speech, equivalent to the Greek goddess or daemon Peitho.
SUBIGUS m Roman Mythology
Subigus is the god (deus) who causes the bride to give in to her husband. The name derives from the verb subigo, subigere, "to cause to go under; tame, subdue," used of the active role in sexual intercourse, hence "cause to submit sexually".
TELLUS f Roman Mythology
Means "the earth, globe" in Latin. In Roman mythology Tellus was the mother goddess who personified the earth, equivalent to the Greek goddess Gaia.
TIBERINUS m Ancient Roman, Roman Mythology
Means "of the river Tiber" in Latin (also see Tiberius), as -inus is a Latin masculine adjectival suffix.... [more]
TRIVIA f Roman Mythology
Means "a place where three roads meet" in Latin, derived from tri- "three" and via "road". In Roman mythology this was the name of the goddess of the night and crossroads, usually associated with witchcraft and sorcery as well as ghosts and childbirth... [more]
TUCCIA f Ancient Roman, Sicilian, Roman Mythology
Feminine form of Latin Tuccius and Italian Tuccio. This was the name of a vestal virgin in Roman legend.
VAGITANUS m Roman Mythology
A god who opened the newborn's mouth for its first cry. The name is related to the Latin noun vagitus, "crying, squalling, wailing," particularly by a baby or an animal, and the verb vagio, vagire.
VÉINEAS f Astronomy, Roman Mythology
Irish form of Venus. It does not appear to be in use as an Irish given name.
VENATRIX f Roman Mythology
Means "huntress" in Latin. This was an epithet of the goddess Diana.
VERITAS f Roman Mythology
Means "truth" in Latin. She was the Roman personification of truth, equivalent to the Greek entity Alethea.
VERTICORDIA f Roman Mythology
Means "turner of hearts" from Latin vertere "to turn, turn about" and cor "heart" (genitive cordis). This was an epithet of the Roman goddess Venus.
VESPER m & f Roman Mythology, Popular Culture
Roman equivalent of Hesperos. Roman mythology was strongly influenced by Greek mythology, meaning that the ancient Romans had incorporated many elements from Greek mythology into their own. Thus, some names were directly taken from Greek mythology and romanized, rather than inventing a legitimate Latin equivalent of it... [more]
VICTRIX f Roman Mythology
Means "a female victor" in Latin (corresponding to masculine victor "conqueror"; see Victor). This was an epithet the Roman goddess Venus ("Venus the Victorious").
VIRGINIENSIS f Roman Mythology
The goddess Cinxia functions within the belt (cingulum) that the bride wears to symbolize that her husband is "belted and bound" (cinctus vinctusque) to her. It was tied with the knot of Hercules, intended to be intricate and difficult to untie... [more]
VIRGO f Roman Mythology, Astronomy
Means "maiden" in Latin. The name of one of the constellations in the zodiac.
VITUMNUS m Roman Mythology
God whom endows the fetus with vita, "life" or the vital principle or power of life (see also quickening). Augustine calls him the vivificator, "creator of life," and links him with Sentinus (following) as two "very obscure" gods who are examples of the misplaced priorities of the Roman pantheon... [more]
VOLUMNA f Roman Mythology
Goddess who grants the child the will to do good.
VOLUMNUS m Roman Mythology
God who grants the child the will to do good. See also Volumna.
VOLUPTAS f Roman Mythology
In Roman mythology, Voluptas was the beautiful daughter born from the union of Cupid and Psyche. She is known as the goddess of sensual pleasures whose Latin name means "pleasure" or "bliss".