Morgan1599's Personal Name List

ACACIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: ə-KAY-shə
From the name of a type of tree, ultimately deriving from Greek ακη (ake) "thorn, point".
ACANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Other Scripts: Ακανθα(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: ə-KAN-thə(English)
Latinized form of Greek Ακανθα (Akantha), which meant "thorn, prickle". In Greek legend she was a nymph loved by Apollo.
ADELAIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Hungarian
Spanish and Hungarian form of ADELAIDE.
ADELYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: AD-ə-lin
Variant of ADELINE using the popular name suffix lyn.
ADERYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Means "bird" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
ADRIANI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Spanish (Latin American)
Other Scripts: Αδριανη
Feminine form of Adrianos.
AEDRE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian (?)
AINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 爱娜 , 蔼娜 , etc .
Pronounced: ah-ee-nah
Combination of Ai (2) and Na.
AINARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh (Rare)
Other Scripts: Айнара (Kazakh Cyrillic), اينارا (Kazakh Arabic)
Derived from Kazakh ай (ay) meaning "moon" combined with Arabic نَار (nār) meaning "fire, flame, light" or Persian نار (nâr) meaning "pomegranate" (or also, "fire").
AIZHANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz (Rare)
Other Scripts: Айжана (Kazakh Cyrillic, Kyrgyz), ايجانا (Kazakh Arabic)
Variant of Aizhan.
AKARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 明里, 朱里, 朱莉, etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: A-KA-REE
From Japanese (aka) meaning "bright" or (aka) meaning "vermilion red" combined with (ri) meaning "village" or (ri) meaning "white jasmine". Other combinations of kanji characters can also form this name.
ALBREA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Medieval English (Latinized)
Feminization of both Albericus and, in early medieval times, of Alfred.
ALCINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Theatre
Pronounced: al-SEE-nə
Latinized form of a Greek name, of which the original spelling was possibly Alkyna or Alsyne. The name is said to mean "strong-willed, opiniated", but it is doubtful whether this is truly correct. Some sources list this name as being the feminine form of Alcinous, which is perhaps the most likely explanation.

Either way, Alcina is best known as being the name of a character from Georg Friedrich Händel's opera of the same name.

ALIZÉE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French (Modern)
Pronounced: A-LEE-ZEH
From French alizé meaning "trade wind".
ALTHAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Αλθαια
Variant of Althea.
ALTYNAI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Алтынай (Kazakh Cyrillic, Kyrgyz), التىناي (Kazakh Arabic)
Means "golden moon", derived from Kazakh and Kyrgyz алтын (altyn) meaning "gold" combined with ай (ay) "moon".
AMARANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Various
From the name of the amaranth flower, which is derived from Greek αμαραντος (amarantos) meaning "unfading". Αμαραντος (Amarantos) was also an Ancient Greek given name.
ANNETTE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, Dutch
Pronounced: A-NEHT(French) ə-NEHT(English) a-NEH-tə(German)
French diminutive of ANNE (1). It has also been widely used in the English-speaking world, and it became popular in America in the late 1950s due to the fame of actress Annette Funicello (1942-).
AOIFE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: EE-fyə(Irish)
Means "beauty" from the Gaelic word aoibh. In Irish legend Aoife was a warrior princess. In war against her sister Scathach, she was defeated in single combat by the hero Cúchulainn. Eventually she was reconciled with her sister and became the lover of Cúchulainn. This name is sometimes used as a Gaelic form of EVE or EVA.
ARETI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Modern Greek form of Arete.
AVIS
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: AY-vis
Probably a Latinized form of the Germanic name Aveza, which was derived from the element avi, of unknown meaning, possibly "desired". The Normans introduced this name to England and it became moderately common during the Middle Ages, at which time it was associated with Latin avis "bird".
AZAHAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Means "orange blossom" in Spanish, ultimately from Arabic زهرة (zahrah) meaning "flower". It is taken from the title of the Virgin Mary, Nuestra Señora del Azahar, meaning "Our Lady of the Orange Blossom", because of the citrus trees that surround a church devoted to her near Murcia.
AZALIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh (Rare), Tajik (Rare), Uzbek (Rare)
Other Scripts: Азалия (Kazakh, Tajik, Uzbek)
Derived from Persian ازلی (azalee) or (azali) meaning "eternal, everlasting", which is ultimately derived from Persian ازل (azal) meaning "to eternally be" or "eternity without beginning". Also compare Persian ازلیت (azaliyyat) meaning "eternity" as well as "pre-existence".
AZARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Allegedly a variant of Azar.
BIYU
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Means "jasper" in Chinese.
BRANWEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh, Welsh Mythology
Pronounced: BRAN-wehn(Welsh)
Means "beautiful raven" from Welsh bran "raven" and gwen "fair, white, blessed". In the Mabinogion, a collection of tales from Welsh myth, she is the sister of the British king Bran and the wife of the Irish king Matholwch.
BRIDGET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish, English, Irish Mythology
Pronounced: BRIJ-it(English)
Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". In Irish mythology this was the name of the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom, the daughter of the god Dagda. In the 5th century it was borne by Saint Brigid, the founder of a monastery at Kildare and a patron saint of Ireland. Because of the saint, the name was considered sacred in Ireland, and it did not come into general use there until the 17th century. In the form Birgitta this name has been common in Scandinavia, made popular by the 14th-century Saint Birgitta of Sweden, patron saint of Europe.
CAMELLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: kə-MEEL-i-ə, kə-MEHL-i-ə
From the name of the flowering shrub, which was named for the botanist and missionary Georg Josef Kamel.
CATHERINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, English
Pronounced: KA-TU-REEN(French) KA-TREEN(French) KATH-ə-rin(English) KATH-rin(English)
French form of KATHERINE, and also a common English variant.
CELANDINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: SEHL-ən-deen, SEHL-ən-dien
From the name of the flower, which derives from Greek χελιδων (chelidon) "swallow (bird)".
CHARIKLEIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Χαρίκλεια
Pronounced: ha-REE-klee-a (Greek)
Means "famous for her grace" from Ancient Greek χάρις (charis) "grace, kindness" and κλέος (kleos) "glory". This is the feminine equivalent of Charikles.

The name Charikleia, also known as Chariclea, is mostly known from the heroine of the 3rd-century Greek novel « Αἰθιοπικά» (Aethiopica), also known as «Των περί Θεαγένην και Χαρίκλειαν» (Theagenes and Chariclea), an ancient Greek romance written by Heliodorus of Emesa. The novel narrates in ten parts the fiery and irresistible love between the beautiful Chariclea and strong Theagenes. Chariclea, the daughter of King Hydaspes and Queen Persinna of Ethiopia, was born white because her mother gazed upon a painting of the naked Andromeda just after her rescue by Perseus while Chariclea was being conceived (an instance of the theory of Maternal impression). Fearing accusations of adultery, Persinna gives her baby daughter to the care of Sisimithras, a gymnosophist, who takes the baby to Egypt and places her in the care of Charicles, a Pythian priest. Chariclea is then taken to Delphi, and made a priestess of Artemis. Theagenes, a noble Thessalian, comes to Delphi and the two fall in love. He runs off with Chariclea with the help of Calasiris, an Egyptian who has been employed by Persinna to find Chariclea. They encounter many perils: pirates, bandits, and others. The main characters ultimately meet at Meroe at the very moment when Chariclea is about to be sacrificed to the gods by her own father. Her birth is made known, and the lovers are happily married.

CHIONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Χιόνη
Pronounced: kie-O-nee (English), KIE-o-nee (English)
Feminine form of Chion.

In Greek mythology, she was the daughter of the naiad Callirrhoe and god of the Nile river Neilus. Zeus had Hermes turn her into a snow cloud and it's from this myth that it is believed that the Greek word khiōn (χιών) came to mean 'snow'. Another story has her as the daughter of the north wind Boreas and Orithyia, where she is a snow nymph or a minor goddess of snow.

CHIONI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Χιόνη
Modern Greek form of Chione.
CHRISTIANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Late Roman
Pronounced: kris-tee-AN-ə(English)
Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN.
CHRISTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Dutch, Greek
Other Scripts: Χριστινα(Greek)
Pronounced: kris-TEE-nə(English) kris-TEE-na(German, Swedish) kris-TEE-nah(Dutch)
From Christiana, the Latin feminine form of CHRISTIAN. This was the name of an early, possibly legendary, saint who was tormented by her pagan father. It was also borne by a 17th-century Swedish queen and patron the arts who gave up her crown in order to become a Roman Catholic.
CHRYSANTHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), Greek (Rare)
Pronounced: kri-SAN-ə (English)
Variant of Chrysanta.
CHRYSANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Χρυσανθη(Ancient Greek)
Feminine form of CHRYSANTHOS.
CLARE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: KLEHR, KLAR
Medieval English form of CLARA. This is also the name of an Irish county, which was originally named for the Norman invader Richard de Clare (known as Strongbow), whose surname was derived from the name of an English river.
CLAUDIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Biblical, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: KLAW-dee-ə(English) KLOW-dya(German, Italian, Romanian) KLOW-dee-ah(Dutch) KLOW-dhya(Spanish) KLOW-dee-a(Classical Latin)
Feminine form of CLAUDIUS. It is mentioned briefly in the New Testament. As a Christian name it was very rare until the 16th century.
CLOVER
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare)
Pronounced: KLO-vər
From the English word for the wild flower, ultimately deriving from Old English clafre.
CORDELIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: kawr-DEE-lee-ə, kawr-DEEL-yə
From Cordeilla, possibly a Celtic name of unknown meaning. According to Geoffrey of Monmouth, Cordeilla was the youngest of the three daughters of King Lear and the only one to remain loyal to her father. When adapting the character for his play 'King Lear' (1606), Shakespeare altered the spelling to Cordelia.
DAHLIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: DAL-yə, DAHL-yə, DAYL-yə
From the name of the flower, which was named for the Swedish botanist Anders Dahl.
DELIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Spanish, Romanian, Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Δηλια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: DEE-lee-ə(English) DEHL-ya(Italian, Spanish) DEH-lee-a(Romanian)
Means "of Delos" in Greek. This was an epithet of the Greek goddess Artemis, given because she and her twin brother Apollo were born on the island of Delos. The name appeared in several poems of the 16th and 17th centuries, and it has occasionally been used as a given name since that time.
DIMITRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Δημητρα(Greek)
Modern Greek form of DEMETER (1).
ELENI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Ελενη(Greek)
Pronounced: eh-LEHN-ee
Modern Greek form of HELEN.
ELORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Rare), French (Modern, Rare), Popular Culture (Rare)
Pronounced: e-LOR-ah, e-LAWR-ah (English, Popular Culture)
Of uncertain origin and meaning, this name is most likely a contraction of Elnora.

Otherwise, Elora is a community in Ontario, Canada named for a ship belonging to the founder's brother. The ship's name had been inspired by the Ellora Caves near Aurangabad, Maharashtra, India.

Elora Danan is one of the protagonists in the 1988 movie Willow.

ELVA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Danish, Icelandic
Feminine form of ALF (1).
ELZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Azerbaijani (Rare)
ELZADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Эльзада (Kyrgyz)
Means "child of the nation", derived from Turkic el meaning "people, country, nation" combined with Persian زاده (zâde) meaning "offspring".
ENDZELA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Georgian
Other Scripts: ენძელა(Georgian)
Means "snowdrop flower" in Georgian (genus Galanthus).
ERIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 絵理座, 絵里沙, 絵里紗, etc.
Pronounced: e-ṙee-zah
From Japanese 絵 (e) meaning "picture, painting, drawing, sketch", 理 (ri) meaning "reason, logic" combined with 座 (ra) meaning "names of constellations". Other kanji combinations are possible as well.

Usage of this name is, most likely, influenced by the name Elisa.

ESMERALDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish, Portuguese, English, Literature
Pronounced: ehs-meh-RAL-da(Spanish) eezh-mi-RAL-du(European Portuguese) eez-meh-ROW-du(Brazilian Portuguese) ehz-mə-RAHL-də(English)
Means "emerald" in Spanish and Portuguese. Victor Hugo used this name in his novel 'The Hunchback of Notre Dame' (1831), in which Esmeralda is the Gypsy girl who is loved by Quasimodo. It has occasionally been used in the English-speaking world since that time.
ESMIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Azerbaijani
Derived from Arabic أَسْمَر (ʾasmar) meaning "dark-skinned, brown, brunette".
EVANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology (Latinized), Theatre
Pronounced: ee-VAN-thee, ə-VAN-thee, i-VAN-thee
Latinized form of Euanthe. Characters named Evanthe appear in John Fletcher's 17th-century tragicomedy A Wife for a Month and Thomas Godfrey's 18th-century romantic tragedy The Prince of Parthia (which was the first play written by an American to be presented in the United States by a professional cast of actors).
FEDERICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: feh-deh-REE-ka
Italian feminine form of FREDERICK.
FEI
Gender: Masculine & Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts:
Means "fly, flit, winged, swift" in Chinese.
FREDERICA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Portuguese, English
Pronounced: fri-di-REE-ku(European Portuguese) freh-deh-REE-ku(Brazilian Portuguese) frehd-ə-REE-kə(English) frehd-REE-kə(English)
Feminine form of FREDERICO or FREDERICK.
GAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Italian
Other Scripts: Γαια(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: GIE-A(Classical Greek) GIE-ə(English) GAY-ə(English) GA-ya(Italian)
From the Greek word γαια (gaia), a parallel form of γη (ge) meaning "earth". In Greek mythology Gaia was the mother goddess who presided over the earth. She was the mate of Uranus and the mother of the Titans and the Cyclopes.
GAIANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Γαιανη(Ancient Greek)
Greek form of GAIANA.
GALENE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Γαληνη(Ancient Greek)
Ancient Greek feminine form of GALEN.
GEORGETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Feminine form of George. George Foreman has a daughter with this name.
GEORGIANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Form of Georgiana
GOZEI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 呉勢, ごぜい (hiragana), ゴゼイ (katakana)
Pronounced: go-ze:, go-dze:
Japanese form of the Okinawan warabi-naa or personal name (childhood name in its literal sense) Gujī (呉勢/グジー), which is comprised of 呉 (go, kure, ku.reru / gu) meaning "do something for, give" and 勢 (sei, zei, ikio.ri, hazumi / ji-) meaning "energy, power, force, vigour."

This name was common before the early 20th century among commoner women, though it's also used for women of samurai (with an addition of either a prefix or a suffix) and aristocratic women (with additions of both a prefix and a suffix).

GRACE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAYS
From the English word grace, which ultimately derives from Latin gratia. This was one of the virtue names created in the 17th century by the Puritans. The actress Grace Kelly (1929-1982) was a famous bearer.
GRACIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: GRAY-see
Diminutive of GRACE.
GRISELDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Scottish, Spanish, Literature
Pronounced: gri-ZEHL-də(English)
Possibly derived from the Germanic elements gris "grey" and hild "battle". It is not attested as a Germanic name. This was the name of a patient wife in medieval tales by Boccaccio and Chaucer.
GUINEVERE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Arthurian Romance
Pronounced: GWIN-ə-vir(English)
From the Norman French form of the Welsh name Gwenhwyfar, derived from the elements gwen meaning "fair, white, blessed" and sebara meaning "phantom, magical being". In Arthurian legend she was the beautiful wife of King Arthur. According to the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth, she was seduced by Mordred before the battle of Camlann, which led to the deaths of both Mordred and Arthur. According to the 12th-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes, she engaged in an adulterous affair with Sir Lancelot.

The Cornish form of this name, Jennifer, has become popular in the English-speaking world.

GULZADA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Kyrgyz
Other Scripts: Гүлзада (Kazakh Cyrillic, Kyrgyz), گۇلزادا (Kazakh Arabic)
Means "flower child" from Kazakh and Kyrgyz гүл (gül) meaning "flower" combined with Persian زاده (zâde) meaning "offspring, child".
GUZAL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tatar, Bashkir
Other Scripts: Гүзәл (Tatar, Bashkir)
Means "beautiful, elegant" or "beauty" in Tatar and Bashkir, of Turkic origin.
GUZALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tatar, Bashkir
Other Scripts: Гузалия (Tatar), Гүзәлиә (Bashkir)
Derived from Tatar and Bashkir гүзәл (güzël) meaning "beautiful".
GWENDOLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh
Pronounced: GWEHN-də-lin(English)
Means "white ring", derived from the Welsh elements gwen meaning "white, fair, blessed" and dolen meaning "ring, loop". This was the name of a mythical queen of the Britons who defeated her husband in battle, as told by Geoffrey of Monmouth.
HANARI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 花凛 etc.
From Japanese 花 (hana) meaning "flower" combined with 凛 (ri) meaning "dignified, severe, cold". Other kanji combinations are possible.
HARRIET
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: HAR-ee-it, HEHR-ee-it
English form of HENRIETTE, and thus a feminine form of HARRY. It was first used in the 17th century, becoming very common in the English-speaking world by the 18th century. A famous bearer was Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896), the American author who wrote 'Uncle Tom's Cabin'.
HELEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
Other Scripts: ‘Ελενη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: HEHL-ən(English)
English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene), probably from Greek ‘ελενη (helene) "torch" or "corposant", or possibly related to σεληνη (selene) "moon". In Greek mythology Helen was the daughter of Zeus and Leda, whose kidnapping by Paris was the cause of the Trojan War. The name was also borne by the 4th-century Saint Helena, mother of the Roman emperor Constantine, who supposedly found the True Cross during a trip to Jerusalem.

The name was originally used among early Christians in honour of the saint, as opposed to the classical character. In England it was commonly spelled Ellen during the Middle Ages, and the spelling Helen was not regularly used until after the Renaissance. A famous bearer was Helen Keller (1880-1968), an American author and lecturer who was both blind and deaf.

HENDRIKA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Dutch
Feminine form of HENDRIK.
HENRIETTA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Hungarian, Finnish, Swedish, Dutch
Pronounced: hehn-ree-EHT-ə(English) HEHN-ree-eht-taw(Hungarian) HEHN-ree-eht-tah(Finnish)
Latinate form of HENRIETTE. It was introduced to England by Henriette Marie, the wife of the 17th-century English king Charles I. The name Henriette was also Anglicized as Harriet, a form that was initially more popular.
ISADORA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: iz-ə-DAWR-ə
Variant of ISIDORA. A famous bearer was the American dancer Isadora Duncan (1877-1927).
ISLA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Scottish, English
Pronounced: IE-lə
Variant of ISLAY, typically used as a feminine name. It also coincides with the Spanish word isla meaning "island".
JANE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: JAYN
Medieval English form of Jehanne, an Old French feminine form of Iohannes (see JOHN). This became the most common feminine form of John in the 17th century, surpassing Joan.

Famous bearers include the uncrowned English queen Lady Jane Grey (1536-1554), who ruled for only 9 days, the British novelist Jane Austen (1775-1817), who wrote 'Sense and Sensibility' and 'Pride and Prejudice', and the British primatologist Jane Goodall (1934-). This is also the name of the central character in Charlotte Brontë's novel 'Jane Eyre' (1847), which tells of her sad childhood and her relationship with Edward Rochester.

JOSEPHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German (Archaic), English (Rare)
Pronounced: yo-ZEH-fa(German)
Feminine form of JOSEPH.
JUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: じゅな, 朱夏, 朱菜, 朱奈, 朱那, 珠愛, 珠菜, 珠奈, 珠那, 珠南
Pronounced: juu-nah
This name can have many meaning depending on the kanji it is written in. If it is written as 樹南, 樹 (ju) means "timber;  trees;  wood;  establish;  set up" and 南 means "south".
JUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 菊娜 , 巨娜 , etc .
Pronounced: joo-nah
Combination of Ju and Na.
KALLIOPE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Καλλιοπη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: KAL-LEE-O-PEH(Classical Greek)
Means "beautiful voice" from Greek καλλος (kallos) meaning "beauty" and οψ (ops) meaning "voice". In Greek mythology she was a goddess of epic poetry and eloquence, one of the nine Muses.
KALOMOIRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Καλομοίρα
Means "beautiful fate", derived from the Greek elements καλος (kalos) "beautiful, fair" and μοιρα (moira) "share, fate". A known bearer is the Greek-American pop singer Kalomira Sarantis (1985-).
KIRI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Maori
Means "skin of a tree or fruit" in Maori. This name has been brought to public attention by New Zealand opera singer Kiri Te Kanawa (1944-).
KIYONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: きよ奈, 喜代奈, 希世菜, 希世奈, 汐菜, 潔那, 清奈, 清名, 綺波, etc.
Pronounced: kee-yo-nah
From Japanese 喜 (ki) meaning "rejoice", 代 (yo) meaning "generations" combined with 奈 (na) meaning "apple tree". Other kanji combinations are possible.
KIZOR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mordvin
Other Scripts: Кизор
Means "summer" in Moksha.
KLEANTHI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek, Albanian
Other Scripts: Κλεάνθη
From the Greek elements κλέος (kleos) "glory" and ἀνθὸς (anthos) "flower".
KLEONIKI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Κλεονίκη
Modern Greek form of Kleonike.
LAIREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Chinese
Other Scripts: 来人
Means "bearer, messenger" in Chinese.
LAURA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Spanish, Italian, Portuguese, Romanian, Finnish, Estonian, Hungarian, Polish, Slovene, Croatian, Czech, Slovak, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, German, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Late Roman
Pronounced: LAWR-ə(English) LOW-ra(Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Polish, German, Dutch) LOW-rah(Finnish, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish) LAW-oo-raw(Hungarian)
Feminine form of the Late Latin name Laurus, which meant "laurel". This meaning was favourable, since in ancient Rome the leaves of laurel trees were used to create victors' garlands. The name was borne by the 9th-century Spanish martyr Saint Laura, who was a nun thrown into a vat of molten lead by the Moors. It was also the name of the subject of poems by the 14th-century Italian poet Petrarch.

As an English name, Laura has been used since the 13th century. Famous bearers include Laura Secord (1775-1868), a Canadian heroine during the War of 1812, and Laura Ingalls Wilder (1867-1957), an American author who wrote the 'Little House on the Prairie' series of novels.

LORRAINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: lə-RAYN
From the name of a region in France, originally meaning "kingdom of LOTHAR". Lothar was a Frankish king, the great-grandson of Charlemagne, whose realm was in the part of France that is now called Lorraine, or in German Lothringen (from Latin Lothari regnum). As a given name, it has been used in the English-speaking world since the late 19th century, perhaps due to its similar sound with Laura. It became popular after World War I when the region was in the news, as it was contested between Germany and France.
MADELINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, French
Pronounced: MAD-ə-lin(English) MAD-ə-lien(English) MAD-lin(English) MAD-LEEN(French)
English form of MAGDALENE. This is the name of the heroine in a series of children's books by Ludwig Bemelmans, first published 1939.
MAGNHILD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Derived from Old Norse magn "mighty, strong" and hildr "battle". This was the name of a novel by the Norwegian author Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson.
MAIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Roman Mythology, Portuguese, Georgian
Other Scripts: Μαια(Ancient Greek) მაია(Georgian)
Pronounced: MIE-A(Classical Greek) MAY-ə(English) MIE-ə(English) MIE-AH(Georgian)
From Greek μαια (maia) meaning "good mother, dame, foster mother", perhaps in origin a nursery form of μητηρ (meter). In Greek and Roman mythology she was the eldest of the Pleiades, the group of seven stars in the constellation Taurus, who were the daughters of Atlas and Pleione. Her son by Zeus was Hermes.
MAIA (2)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Roman Mythology
Pronounced: MAY-ya(Classical Latin) MAY-ə(English) MIE-ə(English)
Probably from Latin maior meaning "greater". This was the name of a Roman goddess of spring, a companion (sometimes wife) of Vulcan. She was later conflated with the Greek goddess Maia. The month of May is named for her.
MARIANNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, English, Hungarian, Slovak, Polish, Finnish, Greek
Other Scripts: Μαριαννα(Greek)
Pronounced: ma-ree-AN-na(Italian) mahr-ee-AHN-ə(English) mar-ee-AN-ə(English) MA-ree-a-na(Slovak) ma-RYAN-na(Polish) MAH-ree-ahn-nah(Finnish)
Combination of MARIA and ANNA. It has been confused with the Roman name MARIANA to the point that it is no longer easy to separate the two forms. It is sometimes also used as a Latinized form of MARIAMNE.
MARILEE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (American)
Pronounced: MER-ə-lee, MAR-ə-lee
Combination of Mary and lee (cf. Marylee), perhaps influenced by similar-sounding names such as Marilyn and Carolee, and/or by the English word merrily (cf. Merrily).
MARTINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Italian, Spanish, Catalan, Czech, Slovak, Croatian, Slovene, Hungarian, English, Swedish, Dutch, Ancient Roman
Pronounced: mar-TEE-na(German, Italian, Spanish) mər-TEE-nə(Catalan) mahr-TEEN-ə(English) mahr-TEE-nah(Dutch)
Feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN). Saint Martina was a 3rd-century martyr who is one of the patron saints of Rome.
MARTINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: French, Dutch, Norwegian
Pronounced: MAR-TEEN(French) mahr-TEE-nə(Dutch)
French, Dutch and Norwegian feminine form of Martinus (see MARTIN).
MARYELLEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MER-ee-EL-ən, MAR-ee-EL-ən
Combination of Mary and Ellen.
MATTEA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian
Pronounced: mat-TEH-a
Italian feminine form of MATTHEW.
MEADOW
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: MEHD-o
From the English word meadow, ultimately from Old English mædwe.
MILDRED
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-drid
From the Old English name Mildþryð meaning "gentle strength", derived from the elements milde "gentle" and þryð "strength". Saint Mildred was a 7th-century abbess, the daughter of the Kentish princess Saint Ermenburga. After the Norman Conquest this name became rare, but it was revived in the 19th century.
MILLICENT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-i-sənt
From the Germanic name Amalasuintha, composed of the elements amal "work, labour" and swinth "strong". Amalasuintha was a 6th-century queen of the Ostrogoths. The Normans introduced this name to England in the form Melisent or Melisende. Melisende was a 12th-century queen of Jerusalem, the daughter of Baldwin II.
MILLIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: MIL-ee
Diminutive of MILDRED, MILLICENT and other names containing the same sound.
MORIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: mo-RIE-ə
From Hebrew מֹרִיָה (Moriyah) possibly meaning "seen by YAHWEH". This is a place name in the Old Testament, both the land where Abraham is to sacrifice Isaac and the mountain upon which Solomon builds the temple. They may be the same place. Since the 1980s it has occasionally been used as a feminine given name in America.
NAIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Basque
Means "wave, sea foam" in Basque.
NAZUNA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: なずな, なず菜, なず奈, 菜, 菜瑞奈, 菜津菜, 菜都菜, 菜都奈, 七砂, 七鈴菜, 奈瑞菜, 奈津菜, 奈都菜, 那瑞奈, 南沙, 名津菜, 薺, etc.
Pronounced: nah-zuu-nah
From Japanese 菜 (nazuna, na) meaning "vegetables, greens", 七 (na) meaning "seven", 奈 (na) meaning "apple tree", 那 (na) meaning "what", 南 (na) meaning "south", 名 (na) meaning "name" or 薺 (nazuna) meaning "water-chestnuts, caltrop", 瑞 (zu) meaning "congratulations", 津 (zu) meaning "haven, port, harbor, ferry", 都 (zu) meaning "metropolis, capital, all, everything" or 鈴 (zu) meaning "bell" combined with 奈 (na) meaning "apple tree", 砂 (zuna) or 沙 (zuna) both meaning "sand" or 菜 (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
NEREIDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Spanish
Pronounced: neh-RAY-dha
Derived from Greek Νηρειδες (Nereides) meaning "nymphs, sea sprites", ultimately derived from the name of the Greek sea god NEREUS, who supposedly fathered them.
ONAZAR
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Uzbek
Derived from ona meaning "mother" or a term of respect for women, and zar meaning "gold, wealth".
ORIANTHI
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek (Rare)
Other Scripts: Οριάνθη
Probably derived from the Greek noun ὄρος (oros) meaning "mountain, hill" (compare Orestes) combined with the Greek noun ἄνθος (anthos) meaning "flower". Also compare the similar-looking name Orinthia, which can even be an anagram of Orianthi, if you move the letters around a bit.

This name is best known for being the name of the Australian singer-songwriter Orianthi Panagaris (b. 1985), who is of Greek descent.

PERISTERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Περιστέρα
Pronounced: pe-ree-ste-ra
Means "pigeon, dove" in Greek. This name is borne by Peristera "Betty" Baziana (1974-), the wife of the Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras.
PERSEPHONE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology
Other Scripts: Περσεφονη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: PEHR-SEH-PO-NEH(Classical Greek) pər-SEHF-ə-nee(English)
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons. With her mother she was worshipped in the Eleusinian Mysteries, which were secret rites practiced at the city of Eleusis near Athens.
PETRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: German, Dutch, Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Croatian, Hungarian, Swedish, Finnish, English
Pronounced: PEH-tra(German, Dutch) PEH-traw(Hungarian) PEHT-rah(Finnish) PEHT-rə(English)
Feminine form of PETER. This was also the name of an ancient city in the region that is now Jordan.
PYRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek
Other Scripts: Πυρά
Pronounced: pi-ra
Form of Pyrrha.
REBECCA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, Italian, Swedish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רִבְקָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: rə-BEHK-ə(English) reh-BEHK-ka(Italian)
From the Hebrew name רִבְקָה (Rivqah) from an unattested root probably meaning "join, tie, snare". This is the name of the wife of Isaac and the mother of Esau and Jacob in the Old Testament. It came into use as a Christian name after the Protestant Reformation, and it was popular with the Puritans in the 17th century.
REGINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Lithuanian, Polish, Czech, Hungarian, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Late Roman
Pronounced: ri-JEE-nə(English) ri-JIE-nə(English) reh-GEE-na(German) reh-JEE-na(Italian) reh-KHEE-na(Spanish) reh-GYEE-na(Polish) REH-gee-naw(Hungarian)
Means "queen" in Latin (or Italian). It was in use as a Christian name from early times, and was borne by a 2nd-century saint. In England it was used during the Middle Ages in honour of the Virgin Mary, and it was later revived in the 19th century. A city in Canada bears this name, in honour of Queen Victoria.
RHODA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, English
Other Scripts: ‘Ροδη(Ancient Greek)
Pronounced: RO-də(English)
Derived from Greek ‘ροδον (rhodon) meaning "rose". In the New Testament this name was borne by a maid in the house of Mary the mother of John Mark. As an English given name, Rhoda came into use in the 17th century.
RHOSYN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Welsh (Rare)
Means "rose" in Welsh. This is a modern Welsh name.
RISANA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: りさな, 梨沙菜, 綾彩奈, 李早奈, 梨真, 理彩奈, 莉更, 莉早奈, etc.
Pronounced: ṙee-sah-nah
From Japanese 梨 (ri) meaning "pear", 沙 (sa) meaning "sand" combined with 菜 (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other combinations of kanji are also possible.
RIYONA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 梨世菜, etc.
Pronounced: ṙee-yo-nah
From Japanese 梨 (ri) meaning "pear", 世 (yo) meaning "world" combined with 菜 (na) meaning "vegetables, greens". Other kanji combinations are possible.
RUTH (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English, German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Spanish, Biblical, Biblical Latin
Other Scripts: רוּת(Ancient Hebrew)
Pronounced: ROOTH(English) ROOT(German, Spanish)
From a Hebrew name that was derived from the Hebrew word רְעוּת (re'ut) meaning "friend". This is the name of the central character in the Book of Ruth in the Old Testament. She was a Moabite woman who accompanied her mother-in-law Naomi back to Bethlehem after Ruth's husband died. There she met and married Boaz. She was an ancestor of King David.

As a Christian name, Ruth has been in use since the Protestant Reformation. It became very popular in America following the birth of "Baby" Ruth Cleveland (1891-1904), the daughter of President Grover Cleveland.

SADIE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SAY-dee
Diminutive of SARAH.
SCARLETT
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Pronounced: SKAHR-lit
From a surname that denoted a person who sold or made clothes made of scarlet (a kind of cloth, possibly derived from Persian سقرلاط (saghrilat)). Margaret Mitchell used this name for Scarlett O'Hara, the main character in her novel 'Gone with the Wind' (1936). Scarlett's name came from her grandmother's maiden name.
SEIKO
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 聖子, 馨子, 晶子, 星子, 青子, etc.
Pronounced: se:-ko
From Japanese 聖 (sei) meaning "saint", 馨 (sei) meaning "fragrant, aromatic", 晶 (sei) meaning "clear, crystal", 星 (sei) meaning "star" or 青 (sei) meaning "blue" combined with 子 (ko) meaning "child". Other kanji combinations are also possible.

Famous bearers are Seiko Yamamoto, a Japanese wrestler who won four world titles and two Asian Wrestling Championships in her career, Seiko Niizuma, a Japanese actress and singer and Seiko Hashimoto, a Japanese politician who was formerly a speed skater and track cycling sprinter.

SEIZA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese
Other Scripts: 星座
Pronounced: se:-zah
From Japanese 星座 (seiza) meaning "constellation".
SELINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English
Possibly a variant of CÉLINE or SELENE. As an English name, it first came into use in the 17th century.
SENEZHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mordvin
Other Scripts: Сэнежа
Means "dark blue" in Erzya.
SEVDA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Turkish, Azerbaijani
Means "love, infatuation" in Turkish and Azerbaijani.
SIGNY
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Norwegian
Norwegian variant form of SIGNÝ.
SILVESTRA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian, Slovene
Pronounced: seel-VEH-stra(Italian)
Feminine form of SILVESTER.
SIRVARD
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Armenian
Other Scripts: Սիրվարդ(Armenian)
Means "love rose" in Armenian.
SUZUME
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Japanese (Rare)
Other Scripts: , etc.(Japanese Kanji)
Pronounced: SOO-ZOO-MEH
From Japanese (suzume) meaning "sparrow", as well as other kanji or kanji combinations that are pronounced the same way.
SYRNEZHA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mordvin
Other Scripts: Сырнежа
Means "gold" in Erzya.
TAISIYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Russian, Ukrainian
Other Scripts: Таисия(Russian) Таїсія(Ukrainian)
Pronounced: tu-EE-syi-yə(Russian)
Russian and Ukrainian form of THAÏS (referring to the saint).
TALIA (1)
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew
Other Scripts: טַלְיָה, טַלְיָא(Hebrew)
Means "dew from God" in Hebrew, from טַל (tal) meaning "dew" and יָה (yah) referring to the Hebrew God.
TELENA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mordvin
Other Scripts: Телена
Derived from Erzya телень (telenʹ) meaning "of winter", itself a derivative of теле (tele) "winter".
VITALIA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Italian (Rare)
Feminine form of VITALE.
VITOVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Mordvin
Other Scripts: Витова
Means "just, fair" in Erzya.
WREN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: English (Modern)
Pronounced: REHN
From the English word for the small songbird. It is ultimately derived from Old English wrenna.
XANTHE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Other Scripts: Ξανθη(Ancient Greek)
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
YAEL
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew
Other Scripts: יָעֵל(Hebrew)
Pronounced: YA-ehl(Hebrew)
Hebrew form of JAEL.
YLVA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Swedish, Norwegian
Means "she-wolf", a derivative of Old Norse úlfr "wolf".
ZALINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Ossetian, Malay, Karachay-Balkar, Chechen
Other Scripts: Залина (Kazakh, Chechen), Залинæ (Ossetian)
Most likely derived from Persian زر (zar) meaning "gold".
ZANERA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: زنيره
Means "intelligent", "sensible", "wise".
ZAREEN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian
Other Scripts: زرین(Persian)
Means "golden" in Persian.
ZARINA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh, Ossetian, Malay, Indian (Muslim)
Other Scripts: Зарина (Kazakh Cyrillic), زارىينا (Kazakh Arabic), زرینہ (Urdu), ज़रीना (Hindi)
Pronounced: zə-REE-na (Kazakh)
Variant of Zareen.
ZARINE
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Persian, Indian
Other Scripts: زرين (Persian), ज़रीन (Hindi)
Variant of Zareen.
ZARYA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh (Rare), Pakistani (Rare)
Other Scripts: Заря (Kazakh)
Derived from Persian زر (zar) meaning "gold".
ZHANARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Kazakh
Other Scripts: Жанара (Cyrillic), جانارا (Arabic)
Variant of Zhanar.
ZIBIAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical
Other Scripts: צִבְיָה(Ancient Hebrew)
Means "gazelle" or "doe" in Hebrew. In the Old Testament this is the name of the mother of King Joash of Judah.
ZINARA
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Tatar
Other Scripts: Зинара
Pronounced: zee-NAH-rah
From Arabic زاه (zah) meaning "bright, radiant, vivid".
ZIPPORAH
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Biblical, Hebrew
Other Scripts: צִפּוֹרָה(Hebrew)
Pronounced: zi-PAWR-ə(English) ZIP-ə-rə(English)
From the Hebrew name צִפּוֹרָה (Tzipporah), derived from צִפּוֹר (tzippor) meaning "bird". In the Old Testament this is the name of the Midianite wife of Moses. She was the daughter of the priest Jethro.
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