Greek Mythology Names

These names occur in the mythologies and legends of ancient Greece.
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PENELOPE   Πηνελοπη   f   Greek Mythology, English
Possibly derived from Greek πηνελοψ (penelops), a type of duck. Alternatively it could be from πηνη (pene) "threads, weft" and ωψ (ops) "face, eye". In Homer's epic the 'Odyssey' this is the name of the wife of Odysseus, forced to fend off suitors while her husband is away fighting at Troy. It has occasionally been used as an English given name since the 16th century.
PERSEPHONE   Περσεφονη   f   Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown, probably of Pre-Greek origin, but perhaps related to Greek περθω (pertho) "to destroy" and φονη (phone) "murder". In Greek myth she was the daughter of Demeter and Zeus. She was abducted to the underworld by Hades, but was eventually allowed to return to the surface for part of the year. The result of her comings and goings is the changing of the seasons.
PERSEUS   Περσευς   m   Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek περθω (pertho) meaning "to destroy". In Greek mythology Perseus was a hero who was said to have founded the ancient city of Mycenae. He was the son of Zeus and Danaë. Mother and child were exiled by Danaë's father Acrisius, and Perseus was raised on the island of Seriphos. The king of the island compelled Perseus to kill the Gorgon Medusa, who was so ugly that anyone who gazed upon her was turned to stone. After obtaining winged sandals and other tools from the gods, he succeeded in his task by looking at Medusa in the reflection of his shield and slaying her in her sleep. On his return he defeated a sea monster in order to save Andromeda, who became his wife.
PHAEDRA   Φαιδρα   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φαιδρα (Phaidra), derived from φαιδρος (phaidros) meaning "bright". Phaedra was the daughter of Minos and the wife of Theseus in Greek mythology. Aphrodite caused her to fall in love with her stepson Hippolytos, and after she was rejected by him she killed herself.
PHAENNA   Φαεννα   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φαεινος (phaeinos) "shining". According to some Greek myths this was the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
PHAIDRA   Φαιδρα   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of PHAEDRA.
PHILANDER   Φιλανδρος   m   English (Archaic), Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek name Φιλανδρος (Philandros) meaning "friend of man" from Greek φιλος (philos) "friend" and ανηρ (aner) "man" (genitive ανδρος). It was the name of a son of Apollo with the nymph Acalle. In the 18th century this was coined as a word meaning "to womanize", and the name subsequently dropped out of use.
PHILANDROS   Φιλανδρος   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek form of PHILANDER.
PHILOMELA   Φιλομηλα   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek φιλος (philos) "lover, friend" and μηλον (melon) "fruit". The second element has also been interpreted as Greek μελος (melos) "song". In Greek myth Philomela was the sister-in-law of Tereus, who raped her and cut out her tongue. Prokne avenged her sister by killing her son by Tereus, after which Tereus attempted to kill Philomela. However, the gods intervened and transformed her into a nightingale.
PHOBOS   Φοβος   m   Greek Mythology
Means "fear, panic" in Greek. This was one of the sons of Ares in Greek mythology. Also, one of the moons of Mars bears this name.
PHOEBE   Φοιβη   f   English, Greek Mythology (Latinized), Biblical, Biblical Latin
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβη (Phoibe), which meant "bright, pure" from Greek φοιβος (phoibos). In Greek mythology Phoibe was a Titan associated with the moon. This was also an epithet of her granddaughter, the moon goddess Artemis. The name appears in Paul's epistle to the Romans in the New Testament, where it belongs to a female minister in the church at Cenchreae. In England, it began to be used as a given name after the Protestant Reformation. A moon of Saturn bears this name (in honour of the Titan).
PHOEBUS   Φοιβος   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of the Greek name Φοιβος (Phoibos), which meant "bright, pure". This was an epithet of the Greek god Apollo.
PHOIBE   Φοιβη   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek, Biblical Greek
Greek form of PHOEBE.
PHOIBOS   Φοιβος   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Greek form of PHOEBUS.
PHRIXOS   Φριξος   m   Greek Mythology
Greek form of PHRIXUS.
PHRIXUS   Φριξος   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From the Greek Φριξος (Phrixos) which meant "thrilling, causing shivers", derived from φριξ (phrix) "ripple, shiver". In Greek myth Phrixus was the son of Athamus and Nephele. He was to be sacrificed to Zeus, but he escaped with his sister Helle on the back of the ram with the Golden Fleece.
PHYLLIS   Φυλλις   f   Greek Mythology, English, German
Means "foliage" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a woman who killed herself out of love for Demophon and was subsequently transformed into an almond tree. It began to be used as a given name in England in the 16th century, though it was often confused with Felicia.
PISTIS   Πιστις   f   Greek Mythology
Means "trust, faith" in Greek. In Greek mythology Pistis was the personification of trust.
PLOUTON   Πλουτων   m   Greek Mythology
Original Greek form of PLUTO.
PLUTO   Πλουτων   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek Πλουτων (Plouton), derived from πλουτος (ploutos) meaning "wealth". This was an alternate name of Hades, the god of the underworld. This is also the name of a dwarf planet (formerly designated the ninth planet) in the solar system.
POLYDEUKES   Πολυδευκης   m   Greek Mythology
Greek form of POLLUX.
POLYHYMNIA   Πολυυμνια   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of POLYMNIA.
POLYMNIA   Πολυμνια, Πολυυμνια   f   Greek Mythology
Means "abounding in song", derived from Greek πολυς (polys) "much" and ‘υμνος (hymnos) "song, hymn". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and sacred songs, one of the nine Muses.
POLYXENA   Πολυξενη   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Greek Πολυξενη (Polyxene) which was from the word πολυξενος (polyxenos) meaning "entertaining many guests, very hospitable", itself derived from πολυς (polys) "many" and ξενος (xenos) "foreigner, guest". In Greek legend she was a daughter of Priam and Hecuba, beloved by Achilles. After the Trojan War, Achilles' son Neoptolemus sacrificed her.
POLYXENE   Πολυξενη   f   Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of POLYXENA.
POSEIDON   Ποσειδων   m   Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek ποσις (posis) "husband, lord" and δα (da) "earth". In Greek mythology Poseidon was the unruly god of the sea and earthquakes, the brother of Zeus. He was often depicted carrying a trident and riding in a chariot drawn by white horses.
PRAXIS   Πραξις   f   Greek Mythology
Means "practical" in Greek. This was another name for the Greek goddess Aphrodite.
PRIAM   Πριαμος   m   Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Πριαμος (Priamos), possibly meaning "redeemed". In Greek legend Priam was the king of Troy during the Trojan War and the father of many children including Hector and Paris.
PRIAMOS   Πριαμος   m   Greek Mythology
Greek form of PRIAM.
PRIAPOS   Πριαπος   m   Greek Mythology
Greek form of PRIAPUS.
PRIAPUS   Πριαπος   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Meaning unknown. This was the name of a Greek god of fertility, gardens, and the phallus.
PROMETHEUS   Προμηθευς   m   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek προμηθεια (prometheia) meaning "foresight, forethought". In Greek myth he was the Titan who gave the knowledge of fire to mankind. For doing this he was punished by Zeus, who had him chained to a rock and caused an eagle to feast daily on his liver, which regenerated itself each night. Herakles eventually freed him.
PROTEUS   Πρωτευς   m   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek πρωτος (protos) meaning "first". In Greek mythology this was the name of a prophetic god of the sea.
PSYCHE   Ψυχη   f   Greek Mythology
Means "the soul", derived from Greek ψυχω (psycho) "to breathe". The Greeks thought that the breath was the soul. In Greek mythology Psyche was a beautiful maiden who was beloved by Eros (or Cupid in Roman mythology). She is the subject of Keats's poem 'Ode to Psyche' (1819).
PYRRHOS   Πυρρος   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Greek form of PYRRHUS.
PYRRHUS   Πυρρος   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Ancient Greek (Latinized)
From the Greek name Πυρρος (Pyrros) which meant "flame-coloured, red", related to πυρ (pyr) "fire". This was another name of Neoptolemus the son of Achilles. This was also the name of a 3rd-century BC king of Epirus.
PYTHIOS   Πυθιος   m   Greek Mythology
From the Greek place name Πυθω (Pytho), an older name of the city of Delphi, which was probably derived from Greek πυθω (pytho) meaning "to rot". This was an epithet of Apollo.
RHEA   ‘Ρεια, ‘Ρεα   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Roman Mythology
Latinized form of Greek ‘Ρεια (Rheia), meaning unknown, perhaps related to ‘ρεω (rheo) "to flow" or ερα (era) "ground". In Greek mythology Rhea was a Titan, the wife of Cronus, and the mother of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera, Demeter and Hestia. Also, in Roman mythology a woman named Rhea Silvia was the mother of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
RHEIA   ‘Ρεια   f   Greek Mythology
Greek form of RHEA.
SARPEDON   Σαρπηδων   m   Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Greek legend Sarpedon was the son of Zeus and Laodamia, and the king of the Lycians. He was one of the chief warriors who fought against the Greeks in defense of Troy, but he was killed by Patroclus. Another Sarpedon was the son of Zeus and Europa.
SELENA   Σεληνη   f   Spanish, Russian, Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of SELENE. This name was borne by popular Mexican-American singer Selena Quintanilla (1971-1995), who was known simply as Selena.
SELENE   Σεληνη   f   Greek Mythology, Greek
Means "moon" in Greek. This was the name of a Greek goddess of the moon, sometimes identified with the goddess Artemis.
SEMELE   Σεμελη   f   Greek Mythology
Meaning unknown, possibly of Phrygian origin. In Greek mythology she was one of the many lovers of Zeus. Hera, being jealous, tricked Semele into asking Zeus to display himself in all his splendour as the god of thunder. When he did, Semele was struck by lightning and died, but not before giving birth to Dionysos.
SIMON (2)   Σιμων   m   Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek σιμος (simos) meaning "flat-nosed". In Greek mythology this was the name of one of the Telchines, demigods who were the original inhabitants of Rhodes.
TERPSICHORE   Τερψιχορη   f   Greek Mythology
Means "enjoying the dance" from Greek τερψις (terpsis) "delight" and χορος (choros) "dance". In Greek mythology she was the goddess of dance and dramatic chorus, one of the nine Muses.
TETHYS   Τηθυς   f   Greek Mythology
Derived from Greek τηθη (tethe) meaning "grandmother". In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan associated with the sea. She was the wife of Oceanus.
THALEIA   Θαλεια   f   Greek Mythology
Ancient Greek form of THALIA.
THALIA   Θαλεια   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized), Greek
From the Greek name Θαλεια (Thaleia), derived from θαλλω (thallo) meaning "to blossom". In Greek mythology she was one of the nine Muses, presiding over comedy and pastoral poetry. This was also the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).
THANATOS   Θανατος   m   Greek Mythology
Means "death" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek god of death who resided with Hades in the underworld.
THEIA   Θεια   f   Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek θεα (thea) meaning "goddess". In Greek myth this was the name of a Titan goddess of sight, glittering and glory. She was the wife of Hyperion and the mother of the sun god Helios, the moon goddess Selene, and the dawn goddess Eos.
THEMIS   Θεμις   f   Greek Mythology
Means "law of nature, divine law, that which is laid down" in Greek. In Greek mythology this was the name of a Titan who presided over custom and natural law. She was often depicted blindfolded and holding a pair of scales. By Zeus she was the mother of many deities, including the three Μοιραι (Moirai) and the three ‘Ωραι (Horai).
THESEUS   Θησευς   m   Greek Mythology
Possibly derived from Greek τιθημι (tithemi) meaning "to set, to place". Theseus was a heroic king of Athens in Greek mythology. He was the son of Aethra, either by Aegeus or by the god Poseidon. According to legend, every seven years the Cretan king Minos demanded that Athens supply Crete with seven boys and seven girls to be devoured by the Minotaur, a half-bull creature that was the son of Minos's wife Pasiphaë. Theseus volunteered to go in place of one of these youths in order to slay the Minotaur in the Labyrinth where it lived. He succeeded with the help of Minos's daughter Ariadne, who provided him with a sword and a roll of string so he could find his way out of the maze.
TISIPHONE   Τισιφονη   f   Greek Mythology
Means "avenging murder" in Greek, derived from τισις (tisis) "vengeance" and φονη (phone) "murder". This was the name of one of the Furies or Ερινυες (Erinyes) in Greek mythology. She killed Cithaeron with the bite of one of the snakes on her head.
TYCHE   Τυχη   f   Greek Mythology
Means "fortune, chance" in Greek. This was the name of the Greek goddess of fortune, luck and fate.
TYCHON   Τυχων   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek τυγχανω (tynchano) meaning "hit the mark, succeed". This was the name of a minor diety associated with Priapus in Greek mythology. It was also borne by a 5th-century saint from Cyprus.
URANIA   Ουρανιη, Ουρανια   f   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of OURANIA.
URANUS   Ουρανος   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
From Greek Ουρανος (Ouranos), the name of the husband of Gaia and the father of the Titans in Greek mythology. His name is derived from ουρανος (ouranos) meaning "the heavens". This is also the name of the seventh planet in the solar system.
XANTHE   Ξανθη   f   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Derived from Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow" or "fair hair". This was the name of a few minor figures in Greek mythology.
XANTHOS   Ξανθος   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
From Greek ξανθος (xanthos) meaning "yellow". This is the name of several figures, mostly minor, in Greek mythology.
ZEPHYR   Ζεφυρος   m   Greek Mythology (Anglicized)
From the Greek Ζεφυρος (Zephyros) meaning "the west wind". Zephyros was the Greek god of the west wind.
ZEPHYROS   Ζεφυρος   m   Greek Mythology, Ancient Greek
Greek form of ZEPHYR.
ZEPHYRUS   Ζεφυρος   m   Greek Mythology (Latinized)
Latinized form of Zephyros (see ZEPHYR).
ZEUS   Ζευς   m   Greek Mythology
The name of a Greek god, related to the old Indo-European god *Dyeus whose name probably meant "shine" or "sky". In Greek mythology he was the highest of the gods. After he and his siblings defeated the Titans, Zeus ruled over the earth and humankind from atop Mount Olympus. He had control over the weather and his weapon was a thunderbolt.
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