Names Categorized "men"

This is a list of names in which the categories include men.
gender
usage
Amor m & f Roman Mythology, Late Roman, Spanish (Rare), Portuguese (Rare)
Means "love" in Latin. This was another name for the Roman god Cupid. It also means "love" in Spanish and Portuguese, and as a feminine name it can be derived directly from this vocabulary word.
Ananta m & f Hinduism
Means "infinite, endless" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form अनन्त / अनंत (an epithet of the Hindu god Vishnu) and the feminine form अनन्ता / अनंता (an epithet of the goddess Parvati).
Armand m French
French form of Herman.
Armando m Spanish, Italian, Portuguese
Spanish, Italian and Portuguese form of Herman.
Arsen m Armenian
Armenian form of Arsenios.
Arsène m French
French form of Arsenios.
Arseni m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Арсений (see Arseniy).
Arsénio m Portuguese (European)
European Portuguese form of Arsenios.
Arsênio m Portuguese (Brazilian)
Brazilian Portuguese form of Arsenios.
Arsenio m Spanish, Italian
Spanish and Italian form of Arsenios.
Arsenios m Ancient Greek
Means "virile" in Greek. Saint Arsenius was a 5th-century deacon who was tutor to the two sons of the Roman emperor Theodosius. The two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, divided the empire into eastern and western halves upon their father's death.
Arseniy m Russian
Russian form of Arsenios.
Arseny m Russian
Alternate transcription of Russian Арсений (see Arseniy).
Bai m & f Chinese
From Chinese (bái) meaning "white, pure", (bǎi) meaning "one hundred, many" or (bǎi) meaning "cypress tree, cedar" (which is usually only masculine). Other Chinese characters can form this name as well. This name was borne in the 8th century by the Tang dynasty poet Li Bai, whose given was .
Carl m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English
German form of Charles. Two noteworthy bearers of the name were the German mathematician Carl Gauss (1777-1855), who made contributions to number theory and algebra as well as physics and astronomy, and the Swiss psychologist Carl Jung (1875-1961), who founded analytical psychology. It was imported to America in the 19th century by German immigrants.
Carlijn f Dutch
Dutch feminine form of Carel.
Carlinhos m Portuguese
Portuguese diminutive of Carlos.
Carlos m Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Charles.
Carlota f Spanish, Portuguese
Spanish and Portuguese form of Charlotte.
Carlotta f Italian
Italian form of Charlotte.
Carlu m Corsican
Corsican form of Charles.
Carola f Italian, German, Dutch, Swedish
Feminine form of Carolus.
Carole f French
French feminine form of Carolus.
Carolien f Dutch
Dutch feminine form of Carolus.
Carolin f German
German feminine form of Carolus.
Carolina f Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, English, Swedish
Latinate feminine form of Carolus. This is the name of two American states: North and South Carolina. They were named for Charles I, king of England.
Charlène f French
French form of Charlene.
Charlene f English
Feminine diminutive of Charles.
Charles m English, French
From the Germanic name Karl, which was derived from a Germanic word meaning "man". However, an alternative theory states that it is derived from the common Germanic name element hari meaning "army, warrior".... [more]
Charlize f Southern African, Afrikaans
Feminine form of Charles using the popular Afrikaans name suffix ize. This name was popularized by South African actress Charlize Theron (1975-), who was named after her father Charles.
Charlot m French
French diminutive of Charles.
Charlotta f Swedish
Swedish variant of Charlotte.
Charly m French
Diminutive of Charles.
Chi 2 m & f Mythology, Western African, Igbo
Means "god, spiritual being" in Igbo, referring to the personal spiritual guardian that each person is believed to have. Christian Igbo people use it as a name for the personal Christian god. This can also be a short form of the many Igbo names that begin with this element.
Dương m Vietnamese
From Sino-Vietnamese (dương) meaning "male, virile".
Erdoğan m Turkish
From Turkish er "brave man" and doğan "falcon".
Ermanno m Italian
Italian form of Herman.
Freyr m Norse Mythology, Icelandic
Means "lord" in Old Norse. This is the name of a Norse god. He may have originally been called Yngvi, with the name Freyr being his title. Freyr is associated with fertility, sunlight and rain, and is the husband of the frost giantess Gerd. With his twin sister Freya and father Njord he is one of the group of deities called the Vanir.
Fu m & f Chinese
From Chinese () meaning "abundant, rich, wealthy", () meaning "hibiscus, lotus" or () meaning "begin, man, father", in addition to other characters with a similar pronunciation. A famous bearer was the 8th-century Tang dynasty poet Du Fu, whose given name was .
Hariman m Ancient Germanic
Old Germanic form of Herman.
Haru m & f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "light, sun, male", (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather". Other kanji or kanji combinations can form this name as well.
Haruka f & m Japanese
From Japanese (haruka) meaning "distant, remote". It can also come from (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "clear weather" combined with (ka) meaning "flower, blossom" or (ka) meaning "fragrance". Additionally, other kanji combinations can form this name.
Haruki m Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "clear weather" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ki) meaning "brightness" or (ki) meaning "living". Other kanji combinations are possible.
Haruko f Japanese
From Japanese (haru) meaning "spring" or (haru) meaning "light, sun, male" combined with (ko) meaning "child", as well as other kanji combinations.
Herman m English, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Finnish, Slovene, Ancient Germanic
Means "army man", derived from the Germanic elements hari "army" and man "man". It was introduced to England by the Normans, died out, and was revived in the English-speaking world in the 19th century. It was borne by an 18th-century Russian missionary to Alaska who is venerated as a saint in the Orthodox Church, though in his case the name is an alternate transcription of German. Another famous bearer was the American writer Herman Melville (1819-1891), the author of Moby-Dick.
Hermanus m Dutch, Ancient Germanic (Latinized)
Latinized form of Herman. As a Dutch name, it is used on birth certificates with the form Herman typically used in daily life.
Hermine f German, French
Feminine form of Herman.
Huang m & f Chinese
From Chinese (huáng) meaning "bright, shining, luminous" (which is usually only masculine) or (huáng) meaning "phoenix" (usually only feminine). Other Chinese characters are also possible.
Inge f & m Danish, Norwegian, Swedish, German, Dutch, Estonian
Short form of Scandinavian and German names beginning with the element ing, which refers to the Germanic god Ing. In Sweden and Norway this is primarily a masculine name, elsewhere it is usually feminine.
Jaya f & m Hinduism, Tamil, Indian, Telugu, Hindi, Marathi
Derived from Sanskrit जय (jaya) meaning "victory". This is a transcription of both the feminine form जया (an epithet of the Hindu goddess Durga) and the masculine form जय (borne by several characters in Hindu texts). As a modern personal name, this transcription is both feminine and masculine in southern India, but typically only feminine in the north.
Kalle m Swedish, Finnish, Estonian
Swedish diminutive of Karl. It is used in Finland and Estonia as a full name.
Kāne m Polynesian Mythology
Means "man" in Hawaiian, a cognate of Tāne. In Hawaiian mythology Kāne was the creator god.
Karl m German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, English, Finnish, Estonian, Ancient Germanic
German and Scandinavian form of Charles. This was the name of seven emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and an emperor of Austria, as well as kings of Sweden and Norway. Other famous bearers include Karl Marx (1818-1883), the German philosopher and revolutionary who laid the foundations for communism, and Karl Jaspers (1883-1969), a German existentialist philosopher.
Karla f German, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish, Czech, Croatian
German, Scandinavian, Czech and Croatian feminine form of Charles.
Karlijn f Dutch
Dutch feminine form of Karel.
Karlo m Croatian
Croatian form of Charles.
Karola f German, Hungarian, Polish
German, Hungarian and Polish feminine form of Carolus.
Karolína f Czech, Slovak
Czech and Slovak feminine form of Carolus.
Karoline f German, Danish, Norwegian
Feminine form of Carolus.
Karolos m Greek
Greek form of Carolus.
K'awiil m Mayan Mythology
Means "powerful" in Mayan. This is the name of the Maya god of lightning. He was sometimes depicted with one of his legs taking the form of a serpent.
Kukulkan m Mayan Mythology
Means "feathered serpent" in Mayan. This is the name of snake god in Maya legend, roughly equivalent to Quetzalcoatl in Aztec mythology.
Kun f & m Chinese
From Chinese (kūn) meaning "earth, female", as well as other characters with a similar pronunciation.
Māui m & f Hawaiian, Polynesian Mythology
Meaning unknown. In Hawaiian mythology Māui was a trickster who created the Hawaiian Islands by having his brothers fish them out of the sea. He was also responsible for binding the sun and slowing its movement.
Meztli m & f Aztec and Toltec Mythology, Indigenous American, Nahuatl
Means "moon" in Nahuatl. This was the name of the Aztec god (or goddess) of the moon.
Nanook m Indigenous American, Inuit
Variant of Nanuq. This was the (fictional) name of the subject of Robert Flaherty's documentary film Nanook of the North (1922).
Nanuq m Indigenous American, Inuit
Means "polar bear" in Inuktitut.
Nikephoros m & f Ancient Greek, Greek Mythology
Means "carrying victory" from Greek νίκη (nike) meaning "victory" and φέρω (phero) meaning "to carry, to bear". This name was borne by several Byzantine emperors, including the 10th-century Nikephoros II Phokas. Besides being a masculine personal name, it was also a title borne by the goddess Athena.
Noor 1 f & m Arabic, Urdu
Alternate transcription of Arabic/Urdu نور (see Nur).
Nour f & m Arabic
Alternate transcription of Arabic نور (see Nur).
Nur f & m Arabic, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Uyghur, Indonesian, Malay
Means "light" in Arabic. In Islamic tradition النور (al-Nur) is one of the 99 names of Allah.
Qing f & m Chinese
From Chinese (qīng) meaning "blue, green, young", as well as other characters pronounced in a similar way.
Radha f & m Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Tamil, Kannada, Hindi, Marathi
Means "success" in Sanskrit. This is the name of the favourite consort of the Hindu god Krishna.
Raven f & m English
From the name of the bird, ultimately from Old English hræfn. The raven is revered by several Native American groups of the west coast. It is also associated with the Norse god Odin.
Šarlota f Czech
Czech form of Charlotte.
Siarl m Welsh
Welsh form of Charles.
Sushila f & m Hinduism, Indian, Hindi, Marathi, Nepali
Means "good-tempered, well-disposed", derived from the Sanskrit prefix सु (su) meaning "good" combined with शील (shila) meaning "conduct, disposition". This is a transcription of both the feminine form सुशीला and the masculine form सुशील. This name is borne by wives of the Hindu gods Krishna and Yama.
Tama m Maori
Means "son, boy" in Maori.
Tāne m Maori, Polynesian Mythology
Means "man" in Maori. In Maori and other Polynesian mythology Tāne was the god of forests and light. He was the son of the sky god Rangi and the earth goddess Papa, who were locked in an embrace and finally separated by their son. He created the tui bird and, by some accounts, man.
Vijaya m & f Hinduism, Indian, Telugu, Kannada, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, Hindi
Means "victory" in Sanskrit. This is a transcription of both the masculine form विजय and the feminine form विजया, both of which are used frequently in Hindu texts. It is the name of a grandson of Indra, a son of Krishna and it is another name of the goddess Durga. This was also the name of a semi-legendary 6th-century BC king of Sri Lanka.
Yang m & f Chinese
From Chinese (yáng) meaning "ocean" or (yáng) meaning "light, sun, male" (which is typically only masculine), as well as other Chinese characters pronounced similarly.